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1.
Psychol Health Med ; 27(2): 403-408, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223229

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to explore which age group out of the patients in quarantine wards with novel coronavirus pneumonia is the most susceptible to anxiety. The data of 32 Covid-19 patients isolated in the quarantine wards of the second Infectious Diseases Department of Baoding Hospital and 71 Covid-19 patients in Tangshan City Infectious Disease Hospital from January 24th to March 5th, 2020, a total of 103 patients, were analyzed. Among these patients, 97 isolated patients were scored with a self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) score seven days after quarantine, and the correlation between age and score was analyzed. These 97 isolated patients were then divided into three groups according to age: group A (up to 35 years old), group B (36-60 years), and group C (over 60 years). One-way analysis of variance was used to compare the scores among groups. The Q-test was used for pairwise comparison.P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.There was a negative correlation between age and SAS score in isolated Covid-19 patients, and the differences in the score among groups were statistically significant. Patients under 35 years old were more prone to anxiety when they were isolated for seven days. Isolated patients aged up to 35 years old need more attention from quarantine medical staff, communication should be strengthened, and psychological intervention from psychotherapists should be given if necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Respiration ; 100(2): 116-126, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044350

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is still no clinical evidence available to support or to oppose corticosteroid treatment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of corticosteroid given to the hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, single-blind, randomized control trial. Adult patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who were admitted to the general ward were randomly assigned to either receive methylprednisolone or not for 7 days. The primary end point was the incidence of clinical deterioration 14 days after randomization. RESULTS: We terminated this trial early because the number of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in all the centers decreased in late March. Finally, a total of 86 COVID-19 patients underwent randomization. There was no difference of the incidence of clinical deterioration between the methylprednisolone group and control group (4.8 vs. 4.8%, p = 1.000). The duration of throat viral RNA detectability in the methylprednisolone group was 11 days (interquartile range, 6-16 days), which was significantly longer than that in the control group (8 days [2-12 days], p = 0.030). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in other secondary outcomes. Mass cytometry discovered CD3+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and NK cells in the methylprednisolone group which were significantly lower than those in the control group after randomization (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: From this prematurely closed trial, we found that the short-term early use of corticosteroid could suppress the immune cells, which may prolong severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 shedding in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04273321.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pharynx/chemistry , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Virus Shedding , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , CD3 Complex , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Disease Progression , Early Medical Intervention , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Patients' Rooms , Pharynx/virology , Proportional Hazards Models , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Blind Method , T-Lymphocyte Subsets , T-Lymphocytes , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
World J Clin Cases ; 8(20): 4908-4916, 2020 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-918545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia poses a particular challenge to the emergency surgical treatment of elderly patients with high-risk acute abdominal diseases. Elderly patients are a high-risk group for surgical treatment. If the incarceration of gallstones cannot be relieved, emergency surgery is unavoidable. CASE SUMMARY: We report an 89-year-old male patient with acute gangrenous cholecystitis and septic shock induced by incarcerated cholecystolithiasis. He had several coexisting, high-risk underlying diseases, had a history of radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer, and was taking aspirin before the operation. Nevertheless, he underwent emergency laparoscopic cholecystectomy, with maintenance of postoperative heart and lung function, successfully recovered, and was discharged on day 8 after the operation. CONCLUSION: Emergency surgery for elderly patients with acute abdominal disease is safe and feasible during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the key is to abide strictly by the hospital's epidemic prevention regulations, fully implement the epidemic prevention procedure for emergency surgery, fully prepare before the operation, accurately perform the operation, and carefully manage the patient postoperatively.

4.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 17(7): 839-846, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-38758

ABSTRACT

Rationale: The current outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan, China, spreads across national and international borders. The overall death rate of COVID-19 pneumonia in the Chinese population was 4%.Objectives: To describe the process of hospitalization and critical care of patients who died of COVID-19 pneumonia.Methods: This was a multicenter observational study of 109 decedents with COVID-19 pneumonia from three hospitals in Wuhan. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment data were collected and analyzed, and the final date of follow-up was February 24, 2020.Results: The mean age of 109 decedents with COVID-19 pneumonia was 70.7 years, 35 patients (32.1%) were female, and 85 patients (78.0%) suffered from one or more underlying comorbidities. Multiple organ failure, especially respiratory failure and heart failure, appeared in all patients even at the early stage of disease. Overall, the mean time from onset of symptoms to death was 22.3 days. All 109 hospitalized patients needed admission to an intensive care unit (ICU); however, because of limited availability, only 51 (46.8%) could be admitted. The period from hospitalization to death in the ICU group and non-ICU group was 15.9 days (standard deviation = 8.8 d) and 12.5 days (8.6 d, P = 0.044), respectively.Conclusions: Mortality due to COVID-19 pneumonia was concentrated in patients above the age of 65 years, especially those with major comorbidities. Patients who were admitted to the ICU lived longer than those who were not. Our findings should aid in the recognition and clinical management of such infections, especially with regard to ICU resource allocation.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care/methods , Multiple Organ Failure , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Respiratory Insufficiency , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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