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1.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 124, 2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795804

ABSTRACT

Variants of concern (VOCs) like Delta and Omicron, harbor a high number of mutations, which aid these viruses in escaping a majority of known SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). In this study, Rhesus macaques immunized with 2-dose inactivated vaccines (Coronavac) were boosted with an additional dose of homologous vaccine or an RBD-subunit vaccine, or a bivalent inactivated vaccine (Beta and Delta) to determine the effectiveness of sequential immunization. The booster vaccination significantly enhanced the duration and levels of neutralizing antibody titers against wild-type, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Animals administered with an indicated booster dose and subsequently challenged with Delta or Omicron variants showed markedly reduced viral loads and improved histopathological profiles compared to control animals, indicating that sequential immunization could protect primates against Omicron. These results suggest that sequential immunization of inactivated vaccines or polyvalent vaccines could be a potentially effective countermeasure against newly emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/genetics
2.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 5(1): 89-93, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712020

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Omicron (B.1.1.529) SARS-COV-2 variant has raised serious concerns because of its unprecedented rapid rate of spreading and the fact that there are 36 mutations in the spike protein. Since the vaccine-induced neutralizing antibody targets are the spike protein, this may lead to the possibility of vaccine-induced humoral immunity escape. METHODS: We measured the neutralizing activity in vitro for Omicron and compared this with wild type (WH-09) and Delta variants in human and monkey sera from different types of immunity. The monkey sera samples were collected at 1 and 3 months post three-dose inactivated (PiCoVacc) and recombinant protein (ZF2001) vaccination. Human sera were collected from 1 month post three-dose inactivated vaccination. RESULTS: In inactivated vaccine sera, at 1/3 months post three-dose, geometric mean titers (GMTs) of neutralization antibody (NAb) against the Omicron variant were 4.9/5.2-fold lower than those of the wild type. In recombinant protein vaccine sera, GMTs of NAb against Omicron were 15.7/8.9-fold lower than those of the wild type. In human sera, at 1 month post three-dose inactivated vaccination, GMTs of NAb against Omicron were 3.1-fold lower than those of the wild type. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that despite a reduction in neutralization titers, cross-neutralizing activity against Omicron and Delta variants was still observed after three doses of inactivated and recombinant protein vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Cross Reactions , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Haplorhini , Humans , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 29, 2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655546

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is transmitted on mink farms between minks and humans in many countries. However, the systemic pathological features of SARS-CoV-2-infected minks are mostly unknown. Here, we demonstrated that minks were largely permissive to SARS-CoV-2, characterized by severe and diffuse alveolar damage, and lasted at least 14 days post inoculation (dpi). We first reported that infected minks displayed multiple organ-system lesions accompanied by an increased inflammatory response and widespread viral distribution in the cardiovascular, hepatobiliary, urinary, endocrine, digestive, and immune systems. The viral protein partially co-localized with activated Mac-2+ macrophages throughout the body. Moreover, we first found that the alterations in lipids and metabolites were correlated with the histological lesions in infected minks, especially at 6 dpi, and were similar to that of patients with severe and fatal COVID-19. Particularly, altered metabolic pathways, abnormal digestion, and absorption of vitamins, lipids, cholesterol, steroids, amino acids, and proteins, consistent with hepatic dysfunction, highlight metabolic and immune dysregulation. Enriched kynurenine in infected minks contributed to significant activation of the kynurenine pathway and was related to macrophage activation. Melatonin, which has significant anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, was significantly downregulated at 6 dpi and displayed potential as a targeted medicine. Our data first illustrate systematic analyses of infected minks to recapitulate those observations in severe and fetal COVID-19 patients, delineating a useful animal model to mimic SARS-CoV-2-induced systematic and severe pathophysiological features and provide a reliable tool for the development of effective and targeted treatment strategies, vaccine research, and potential biomarkers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , Metabolome , Mink/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Amino Acids/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/pathology , Macrophages, Alveolar/virology , Melatonin/metabolism , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sterols/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Replication/genetics
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 200, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237988

ABSTRACT

Influenza A virus may circulate simultaneously with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, leading to more serious respiratory diseases during this winter. However, the influence of these viruses on disease outcome when both influenza A and SARS-CoV-2 are present in the host remains unclear. Using a mammalian model, sequential infection was performed in ferrets and in K18-hACE2 mice, with SARS-CoV-2 infection following H1N1. We found that co-infection with H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 extended the duration of clinical manifestation of COVID-19, and enhanced pulmonary damage, but reduced viral shedding of throat swabs and viral loads in the lungs of ferrets. Moreover, mortality was increased in sequentially infected mice compared with single-infection mice. Compared with single-vaccine inoculation, co-inoculation of PiCoVacc (a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine) and the flu vaccine showed no significant differences in neutralizing antibody titers or virus-specific immune responses. Combined immunization effectively protected K18-hACE2 mice against both H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our findings indicated the development of systematic models of co-infection of H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2, which together notably enhanced pneumonia in ferrets and mice, as well as demonstrated that simultaneous vaccination against H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 may be an effective prevention strategy for the coming winter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/immunology , Coinfection/pathology , Coinfection/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Ferrets , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology
5.
J Infect Dis ; 223(8): 1313-1321, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091239

ABSTRACT

Domestic cats, an important companion animal, can be infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). This has aroused concern regarding the ability of domestic cats to spread the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019. We systematically demonstrated the pathogenesis and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in cats. Serial passaging of the virus between cats dramatically attenuated the viral transmissibility, likely owing to variations of the amino acids in the receptor-binding domain sites of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 between humans and cats. These findings provide insight into the transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in cats and information for protecting the health of humans and cats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Amino Acids/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Cats , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Male , Vero Cells
6.
Front Microbiol ; 11: 618891, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054989

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread across the world and impacted global healthcare systems. For clinical patients, COVID-19 not only induces pulmonary lesions but also affects extrapulmonary organs. An ideal animal model that mimics COVID-19 in humans in terms of the induced systematic lesions is urgently needed. Here, we report that Syrian hamster is highly permissive to SARS-CoV-2 and exhibit diffuse alveolar damage and induced extrapulmonary multi-organs damage, including spleen, lymph nodes, different segments of alimentary tract, kidney, adrenal gland, ovary, vesicular gland and prostate damage, at 3-7 days post inoculation (dpi), based on qRT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry detection. Notably, the adrenal gland is a novel target organ, with abundant viral RNA and antigen expression detected, accompanied by focal to diffuse inflammation. Additionally, viral RNA was also detected in the corpus luteum of the ovary, vesicular gland and prostate. Focal lesions in liver, gallbladder, myocardium, and lymph nodes were still present at 18 dpi, suggesting potential damage after disease. Our findings illustrate systemic histological observations and the viral RNA and antigen distribution in infected hamsters during disease and convalescence to recapitulate those observed in humans with COVID-19, providing helpful data to the pathophysiologic characterization of SARS-CoV-2-induced systemic disease and the development of effective treatment strategies.

7.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 3(4): 316-318, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1001795

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to investigate the sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 to different temperatures, to provide basic data and a scientific basis for the control of COVID-19 epidemic. The virus was dispersed in 1 mL basal DMEM medium at a final concentration of 103.2 TCID50/mL and then incubated at 4, 22, 30, 35, 37, 38, 39 and 40°C for up to 5 days. The infectivity of residual virus was titrated using the Vero E6 cell line. The results showed that the virus remained viable for 5 days at 4°C, and for 1 day only at 22 and 30°C. We found that the infectivity of the virus was completely lost after less than 12 hours at 37, 38 and 39°C, while at 40°C, the inactivation time of the virus was rapidly reduced to 6 hours. We show that SARS-CoV-2 is sensitive to heat, is more stable at lower temperatures than higher temperature, remains viable for longer at lower temperatures, and loses viability rapidly at higher temperatures.

8.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 3(1): 93-97, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-847791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, an outbreak of the Corona Virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan, China, has become a public health emergency of international concern. The high fatality of aged cases caused by SARS-CoV-2 was a need to explore the possible age-related phenomena with non-human primate models. METHODS: Three 3-5 years old and two 15 years old rhesus macaques were intratracheally infected with SARS-CoV-2, and then analyzed by clinical signs, viral replication, chest X-ray, histopathological changes and immune response. RESULTS: Viral replication of nasopharyngeal swabs, anal swabs and lung in old monkeys was more active than that in young monkeys for 14 days after SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Monkeys developed typical interstitial pneumonia characterized by thickened alveolar septum accompanied with inflammation and edema, notably, old monkeys exhibited diffuse severe interstitial pneumonia. Viral antigens were detected mainly in alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 caused more severe interstitial pneumonia in old monkeys than that in young monkeys. Rhesus macaque models infected with SARS-CoV-2 provided insight into the pathogenic mechanism and facilitated the development of vaccines and therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 infection.

9.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4400, 2020 09 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744370

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is highly transmitted through the respiratory route, but potential extra-respiratory routes of SARS-CoV-2 transmission remain uncertain. Here we inoculated five rhesus macaques with 1 × 106 TCID50 of SARS-CoV-2 conjunctivally (CJ), intratracheally (IT), and intragastrically (IG). Nasal and throat swabs collected from CJ and IT had detectable viral RNA at 1-7 days post-inoculation (dpi). Viral RNA was detected in anal swabs from only the IT group at 1-7 dpi. Viral RNA was undetectable in tested swabs and tissues after intragastric inoculation. The CJ infected animal had a higher viral load in the nasolacrimal system than the IT infected animal but also showed mild interstitial pneumonia, suggesting distinct virus distributions. This study shows that infection via the conjunctival route is possible in non-human primates; further studies are necessary to compare the relative risk and pathogenesis of infection through these different routes in more detail.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Conjunctiva/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Intestine, Large/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Nasal Cavity/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Trachea/virology , Viral Load , Virus Replication
10.
J Infect Dis ; 222(4): 551-555, 2020 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704462

ABSTRACT

We simulated 3 transmission modes, including close-contact, respiratory droplets and aerosol routes, in the laboratory. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can be highly transmitted among naive human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) mice via close contact because 7 of 13 naive hACE2 mice were SARS-CoV-2 antibody seropositive 14 days after being introduced into the same cage with 3 infected-hACE2 mice. For respiratory droplets, SARS-CoV-2 antibodies from 3 of 10 naive hACE2 mice showed seropositivity 14 days after introduction into the same cage with 3 infected-hACE2 mice, separated by grids. In addition, hACE2 mice cannot be experimentally infected via aerosol inoculation until continued up to 25 minutes with high viral concentrations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aerosols , Anal Canal/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Respiratory System/virology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Time Factors , Vero Cells , Viral Load , Weight Loss
11.
Science ; 369(6505): 818-823, 2020 08 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-631755

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic. It is unclear whether convalescing patients have a risk of reinfection. We generated a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that was characterized by interstitial pneumonia and systemic viral dissemination mainly in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Rhesus macaques reinfected with the identical SARS-CoV-2 strain during the early recovery phase of the initial SARS-CoV-2 infection did not show detectable viral dissemination, clinical manifestations of viral disease, or histopathological changes. Comparing the humoral and cellular immunity between primary infection and rechallenge revealed notably enhanced neutralizing antibody and immune responses. Our results suggest that primary SARS-CoV-2 exposure protects against subsequent reinfection in rhesus macaques.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Anal Canal/virology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , B-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Host Microbial Interactions , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/immunology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Macaca mulatta , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Viral Load , Virus Replication
12.
Nature ; 583(7818): 830-833, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-220333

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has become a public health emergency of international concern1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the cell-entry receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)2. Here we infected transgenic mice that express human ACE2 (hereafter, hACE2 mice) with SARS-CoV-2 and studied the pathogenicity of the virus. We observed weight loss as well as virus replication in the lungs of hACE2 mice infected with SARS-CoV-2. The typical histopathology was interstitial pneumonia with infiltration of considerable numbers of macrophages and lymphocytes into the alveolar interstitium, and the accumulation of macrophages in alveolar cavities. We observed viral antigens in bronchial epithelial cells, macrophages and alveolar epithelia. These phenomena were not found in wild-type mice infected with SARS-CoV-2. Notably, we have confirmed the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 in hACE2 mice. This mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection will be valuable for evaluating antiviral therapeutic agents and vaccines, as well as understanding the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Lung/pathology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Transgenes , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Bronchi/pathology , Bronchi/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptors, Complement 3d/genetics , Receptors, Complement 3d/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication , Weight Loss
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