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2.
J Infect Public Health ; 13(7): 926-931, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548407

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To determine how long SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA persists in fecal specimens in children with COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospectively, ten children with confirmed COVID-19 in the Jinan Infectious Disease Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University were enrolled between January 23, 2020 to March 9, 2020. Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics of the children were analyzed. RT-PCR assays were performed to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA in the respiratory tract and fecal specimens in the follow-up after discharge. RESULTS: Among ten patients, five (50%) were asymptomatic and five (50%) showed mild symptoms of respiratory illness. The average age of asymptomatic children was younger than that of symptomatic children (p = 0.03). The decreases in white blood cell (WBC) (p = 0.03) and lymphocyte (p = 0.03) counts were more severe in symptomatic patients than those in asymptomatic patients. During the follow-up examination after discharge, seven out of ten patients contained SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA in their fecal specimens, despite all patients showed negative results in respiratory tract specimens. One out of those seven patients relapsed. The median time from onset to being negative results in respiratory tract and fecal specimens was 9 days and 34.43 days, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA persists much longer in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract than that in respiratory tract.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Feces/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Child , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Time Factors
3.
J Hepatol ; 2020 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-345685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Liver enzyme abnormalities are common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Whether or not severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can lead to liver damage per se remains unknown. Herein, we reported the clinical characteristics and liver pathological manifestations of COVID-19 patients with liver enzyme abnormalities. METHODS: We analyzed 156 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 from 2 designated centers in China and compared clinical features between patients with or without elevated aminotransferases. Postmortem liver biopsies were obtained from 2 cases who had elevated aminotransferases. We investigated the patterns of liver impairment by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, TUNEL assay and pathological studies. RESULTS: Sixty-four out of 156 (41.0%) patients with COVID-19 had elevated aminotransferases. The median levels of alanine aminotransferase were 50 U/L vs. 19 U/L, respectively, aspartate aminotransferase were 45.5 U/L vs. 24 U/L, respectively in abnormal and normal aminotransferase groups. Liver enzyme abnormalities were associated with disease severity, as well as a series of laboratory tests including higher alveolar-arterial oxygen partial pressure difference, higher gamma-glutamyltransferase, lower albumin, decreased CD4+ T cells and B lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination identified typical coronavirus particles, characterized by spike structures, in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes in 2 COVID-19 cases. SARS-CoV-2-infected hepatocytes displayed conspicuous mitochondrial swelling, endoplasmic reticulum dilatation and glycogen granule decrease. Histologically, massive hepatic apoptosis and some binuclear hepatocytes were observed. Taken together, both ultrastructural and histological evidence indicated a typical lesion of viral infection. Immunohistochemical results showed scarce CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. No obvious eosinophil infiltration, cholestasis, fibrin deposition, granuloma, massive central necrosis, or interface hepatitis were observed. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection in the liver directly contributes to hepatic impairment in patients with COVID-19. Hence, a surveillance of viral clearance in liver and long-term outcome of COVID-19 is required. LAY SUMMARY: Liver enzyme abnormalities are common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We reported the clinical characteristics and liver pathological manifestations of COVID-19 patients with elevated liver enzymes. Our findings suggested that SARS-CoV-2 infection of the liver is a crucial factor contributing to hepatic impairment in patients with COVID-19.

4.
Mol Biol Rep ; 47(6): 4383-4392, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260333

ABSTRACT

The ACE2 gene is a receptor of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) for COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). To analyze the expression profiles and clinical significances for this gene in humans, RNA-seq data representing 27 different tissues were analyzed using NCBI; total RNA was extracted from different tissues of mouse and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR) was carried out. Immunohistochemistry expression profiles in normal tissues and cancer tissues and TCGA survival analysis in renal and liver cancer were conducted. ACE2 was highly conserved in different species. In normal tissues, ACE2 expression distributions were organ-specific, mainly in the kidney, male testis and female breast, and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. High level of expression in testis, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal system indicated that SARS-CoV-2 might not only attack the lungs, but also affect other organs, particularly the testes, thus it may severely damage male sexual development for younger male and lead to infertility in an adult male, if he contracted COVID-19. On the other side, high expression of ACE2 was correlated with increased survival rate in renal and liver cancer, indicating that ACE2 is a prognostic marker in both renal cancer and liver cancers. Thus, the ACE2 is a functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2 and has a potential anti-tumor role in cancer. Taken together, this study may not only provide potential clues for further medical pathogenesis of COVID-19 and male fertility, but also indicate the clinical significance of the role of the ACE2 gene in cancer.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adult , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Kidney Neoplasms/virology , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mammary Glands, Human/metabolism , Mammary Glands, Human/pathology , Mammary Glands, Human/virology , Mice , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis , Testis/metabolism , Testis/pathology , Testis/virology
5.
Acta Pharm Sin B ; 2020 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-88716

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypercoagulability, hypertension, and multiorgan dysfunction. Effective antivirals with safe clinical profile are urgently needed to improve the overall prognosis. In an analysis of a randomly collected cohort of 124 patients with Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), we found that hypercoagulability as indicated by elevated concentrations of D-dimers was associated with disease severity. By virtual screening of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug library, we identified an anticoagulation agent dipyridamole (DIP) in silico, which suppressed SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro. In a proof-of-concept trial involving 31 patients with COVID-19, DIP supplementation was associated with significantly decreased concentrations of D-dimers (P<0.05), increased lymphocyte and platelet recovery in the circulation, and markedly improved clinical outcomes in comparison to the control patients. In particular, all 8 of the DIP-treated severely ill patients showed remarkable improvement: 7 patients (87.5%) achieved clinical cure and were discharged from the hospitals while the remaining 1 patient (12.5%) was in clinical remission.

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