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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311721

ABSTRACT

Background: Pulmonary embolism is a severe condition prone to misdiagnosis given its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Previous studies on the pneumonia outbreak caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) showed a number of patients with elevated d-dimer, whether those patients combined with pulmonary embolism got our attention. Methods: Data on clinical manifestations, laboratory and radiological findings, treatment, and disease progression of 19 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia,who completed computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) during hospitalization in the Central Hospital of Wuhan from January 2 to March 26, 2020, were reviewed. Results: Of the 19 suspected pulmonary embolism and subjected to CTPA patients, six were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. The Wells’ score of the six patients with pulmonary embolism was 0–1, which suggested a low risk of pulmonary embolism. The median level of d-dimers collected at the day before or on the day of CTPA completion in the patients with pulmonary embolism was 18.36 (interquartile range [IQR]: 6.69–61.46) µg/mL, which was much higher than that in the patients without pulmonary embolism (median 9.47 [IQR: 4.22–28.02] µg/mL). Of the 6 patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism, all patients received anticoagulant therapy, 5 of which survived and were discharged and 1 died. Conclusion: A potential causal relationship exists between COVID-19 infection and pulmonary embolism, but whether this phenomenon is common remains uncertain. The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 patients who developed pulmonary embolism are similar to those of patients with increased d-dimer alone, prompting a significant challenge on differential diagnoses.

2.
Scientometrics ; : 1-15, 2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640950

ABSTRACT

Research on COVID-19 has proliferated rapidly since the outbreak of the pandemic at the end of 2019. Many articles have aimed to provide insight into this fast-growing theme. The social sciences have also put effort into research on problems related to COVID-19, with numerous documents having been published. Some studies have evaluated the growth of scientific literature on COVID-19 based on scientometric analysis, but most of these analyses focused on medical research while ignoring social science research on COVID-19. This is the first scientometric study of the performance of social science research on COVID-19. It provides insight into the landscape, the research fields, and international collaboration in this domain. Data obtained from SSCI on the Web of Science platform was analyzed using VOSviewer. The overall performance of the documents was described, and then keyword co-occurrence and co-authorship networks were visualized. The six main research fields with highly active topics were confirmed by analysis and visualization. Mental health and psychology were clearly shown to be the focus of most social science research related to COVID-19. The USA made the most contributions, with the most extensive collaborations globally, with Harvard University as the leading institution. Collaborations throughout the world were strongly related to geographical location. Considering the social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, this scientometric study is significant for identifying the growth of literature in the social sciences and can help researchers within this field gain quantitative insights into the development of research on COVID-19. The results are useful for finding potential collaborators and for identifying the frontier and gaps in social science research on COVID-19 to shape future studies.

3.
Virol J ; 18(1): 157, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The numbers of confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and COVID-19 related deaths are still increasing, so it is very important to determine the risk factors of COVID-19. Dyslipidemia is a common complication in patients with COVID-19, but the association of dyslipidemia with the severity and mortality of COVID-19 is still unclear. The aim of this study is to analyze the potential association of dyslipidemia with the severity and mortality of COVID-19. METHODS: We searched the PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library databases for all relevant studies up to August 24, 2020. All the articles published were retrieved without language restriction. All analysis was performed using Stata 13.1 software and Mantel-Haenszel formula with fixed effects models was used to compare the differences between studies. The Newcastle Ottawa scale was used to assess the quality of the included studies. RESULTS: Twenty-eight studies involving 12,995 COVID-19 patients were included in the meta-analysis, which was consisted of 26 cohort studies and 2 case-control studies. Dyslipidemia was associated with the severity of COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.44, P = 0.038, I2 = 39.8%). Further, patients with dyslipidemia had a 2.13-fold increased risk of death compared to patients without dyslipidemia (95% CI 1.84-2.47, P = 0.001, I2 = 66.4%). CONCLUSIONS: The results proved that dyslipidemia is associated with increased severity and mortality of COVID-19. Therefore, we should monitor blood lipids and administer active treatments in COVID-19 patients with dyslipidemia to reduce the severity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dyslipidemias/pathology , Lipids/blood , Severity of Illness Index , COVID-19/mortality , Dyslipidemias/mortality , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Advanced Therapeutics ; 4(7):2170016, 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1323847

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infects human cells by binding its spike protein to the human ACE2 receptor. Using a peptide biopanning strategy, the authors have discovered small anti-ACE2 peptides that can effectively block the SARS-CoV-2/ACE2 interaction. The anti-ACE2 peptides can be potentially used as prophylactic or therapeutic agents for SARS-CoV-2 and other ACE2-mediated viruses. This is reported by Kun Cheng and co-workers in article number 2100087.

5.
Adv Ther (Weinh) ; : 2100087, 2021 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201415

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which infects host cells by binding its viral spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) to the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on host cells. Blocking the SARS-CoV-2-RBD/ACE2 interaction is, therefore, a potential strategy to inhibit viral infections. Using a novel biopanning strategy, a small anti-ACE2 peptide is discovered, which shows high affinity and specificity to human ACE2. It blocks not only the SARS-CoV-2-RBD/ACE2 interaction but also the SARS-CoV-1-RBD/ACE2 interaction. Moreover, it inhibits SARS-CoV-2 infection in Vero-E6 cells. The peptide shows negligible cytotoxicity in Vero-E6 cells and Huh7 cells. In vivo short-term lung toxicity study also demonstrates a good safety of the peptide after intratracheal administration. The anti-ACE2 peptide can be potentially used as a prophylactic or therapeutic agent for SARS-CoV-2 or other ACE2-mediated viruses. The strategy used in this study also provides a fast-track platform to discover other antiviral peptides, which will prepare the world for future pandemics.

6.
Diabetes Care ; 44(4): 865-873, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041481

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of in-hospital early-phase glycemic control with adverse outcomes among inpatients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study is a large case series, and data were obtained regarding consecutive patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in the Central Hospital of Wuhan between 2 January and 15 February 2020. All patients with definite outcomes (death or discharge) were included. Demographic, clinical, treatment, and laboratory information were extracted from electronic medical records. We collected daily fasting glucose data from standard morning fasting blood biochemistry to determine glycemic status and fluctuation (calculated as the square root of the variance of daily fasting glucose levels) during the 1st week of hospitalization. RESULTS: A total of 548 patients were included in the study (median age 57 years; 298 [54%] were women, and n = 99 had diabetes [18%]), 215 suffered acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 489 survived, and 59 died. Patients who had higher mean levels of glucose during their 1st week of hospitalization were older and more likely to have a comorbidity and abnormal laboratory markers, prolonged hospital stays, increased expenses, and greater risks of severe pneumonia, ARDS, and death. Compared with patients with the lowest quartile of glycemic fluctuation, those who had the highest quartile of fluctuation magnitude had an increased risk of ARDS (risk ratio 1.97 [95% CI 1.01, 4.04]) and mortality (hazard ratio 2.73 [95% CI 1.06, 7.73]). CONCLUSIONS: These results may have implications for optimizing glycemic control strategies in COVID-19 patients during the early phase of hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/pathology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
7.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-648

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 is an emerging infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and has an average

8.
Stroke ; 51(9): 2674-2682, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: No studies have reported the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic on patients with preexisting stroke. We aim to study the clinical course of COVID-19 patients with preexisting stroke and to investigate death-related risk factors. METHODS: We consecutively included 651 adult inpatients with COVID-19 from the Central Hospital of Wuhan between January 2 and February 15, 2020. Data on the demography, comorbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, treatments, complications, and outcomes (ie, discharged or death) of the participants were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between patients with and without preexisting stroke. The association between risk factors and mortality was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model for stroke patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. RESULTS: Of the 651 patients with COVID-19, 49 with preexisting stroke tended to be elderly, male, had more underlying comorbidities and greater severity of illness, prolonged length of hospital stay, and greater hospitalization expenses than those without preexisting stroke. Cox regression analysis indicated that the patients with stroke had a higher risk of developing critical pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.01 [95% CI, 1.27-3.16]) and subsequent mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.73 [95% CI, 1.00-2.98]) than the patients without stroke. Among the 49 stroke patients, older age and higher score of Glasgow Coma Scale or Sequential Organ Failure Assessment were independent risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Preexisting stroke patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 were readily predisposed to death, providing an important message to individuals and health care workers that preventive measures must be implemented to protect and reduce transmission in stroke patients in this COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Stroke/complications , Stroke/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Progression , Electronic Health Records , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stroke/therapy , Treatment Outcome
9.
Platelets ; 31(4): 490-496, 2020 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-66223

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thrombocytopenia has been implicated in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, while the association of platelet count and changes with subsequent mortality remains unclear. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data of 383 patients with the definite outcome by March 1, 2020 in the Central Hospital of Wuhan were reviewed. The association between platelet parameters and mortality risk was estimated by utilizing Cox proportional hazard regression models. RESULTS: Among the 383 patients, 334 (87.2%) were discharged and survived, and 49 (12.8%) died. Thrombocytopenia at admission was associated with mortality of almost three times as high as that for those without thrombocytopenia (P < 0.05). Cox regression analyses revealed that platelet count was an independent risk factor associated with in-hospital mortality in a dose-dependent manner. An increment of per 50 × 109/L in platelets was associated with a 40% decrease in mortality (hazard ratio: 0.60, 95%CI: 0.43, 0.84). Dynamic changes of platelets were also closely related to death during hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline platelet levels and changes were associated with subsequent mortality. Monitoring platelets during hospitalization may be important in the prognosis of patients with coronavirus disease in 2019.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Thrombocytopenia , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombocytopenia/mortality
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