Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med ; 2021: 5104102, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606211

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to systematically evaluate the effect of exercise on pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in children with bronchial asthma. Methods: A comprehensive search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EBSCO, CNKI, and Wanfang Data Knowledge Service platform to identify any relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published from inception to April 2021. The Cochrane risk of the bias tool was utilized to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies, and RevMan 5.3 was applied to perform data analyses. Results: A total of 22 RCTs involving 1346 patients were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that exercise had significant advantages in improving lung function and exercising capacity and quality of life in children with asthma compared with conventional treatment, such as the forced vital capacity to predicted value ratio (SMD = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.13, 0.40, and P < 0.0001), the peak expiratory flow to predicted value ratio (MD = 4.53; 95% CI: 1.27, 7.80, and P=0.007), the 6-minute walk test (MD = 110.65; 95% CI: 31.95, 189.34, and P=0.006), rating of perceived effort (MD = -2.28; 95% CI: -3.21, -1.36, and P < 0.0001), and peak power (MD = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.37, 1.52, and P=0.001) on exercise capacity and pediatric asthma quality of life questionnaire (MD = 1.28; 95% CI: 0.60, 1.95, and P=0.0002) on quality of life. However, no significant difference was observed in the forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity (P=0.25) and the forced expiratory volume at 1 second to predicted value ratio(P=0.07). Conclusions: Current evidence shows that exercise has a certain effect on improving pulmonary function recovery, exercise capacity, and quality of life in children with bronchial asthma. Given the limitation of the number and quality of included studies, further research and verification are needed to guide clinical application.

2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0257036, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560695

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 leads small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to survive very hard. The development difficulties of SMEs lead to weak employment and GDP growth in various countries. In the process of COVID-19's continuous spread, what is the major reason for the difficulties of SMEs? This paper hopes to answer this question by studying SMEs in Beijing. On this basis, this paper uses structural equation model (SEM) to study the relatively fast recovery of SMEs in Beijing, China, to explore the factors affecting SMEs in the pandemic. After detailed desk research and interviews with relevant entrepreneurs, this paper collects 234 valid questionnaires from SMEs in various industries in Beijing with the help of Federation of Industry and Commerce and Chamber of Commerce in Beijing. Then the data is analyzed with the SEM, which shows the relationship between cash flow from financing activities, markets, employees, costs, government policies and the impact of the pandemic. Finally, an impact model of the pandemic on SMEs is established. The result of the model indicates that the direct effect of the pandemic on the market is the most prominent, and government policies can significantly reduce the negative impact of the pandemic on SMEs indirectly. Based on this, this paper puts forward some policy suggestions, such as the targeted issuance of consumption vouchers and the reduction of administrative barriers. This will enable megacities in various countries to improve policy support for SMEs and promote the recovery and development of SMEs.

3.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554803

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus's ability to induce hypercytokinemia and cause multiple organ failure makes it imperative to find effective treatments. To understand the mechanism of viral infection and its effects on organ tissues, we analyzed multiple single-cell and bulk RNAseq data from COVID-19 patients' organ samples. Various levels of severity of infection were accounted for, with comparative analyses between mild, moderate, and severely infected patients. Our analysis uncovered an upregulation of the innate immune response via several inflammatory genes, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, and NF-κB. Consequently, we found that the upregulation of these downstream effects can lead to organ injury. The downregulated pathways such as eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and eIF4-mediated host translation, were found to lead to an increased viral translation. We also found that the loss of inhibitory peptides can suppress an overactive innate immune response via NF-κB and interleukin-mediated pathways. Investigation of viral-host protein mapping showed that the interaction of viral proteins with host proteins correlated with the down- and upregulation of host pathways such as decreased eIF2-mediated host translation and increased hypertrophy and fibrosis. Inflammation was increased via the stimulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and suppression of host translation pathways that led to reduced inflammatory inhibitors. Cardiac hypertrophy and organ fibrosis were the results of increased inflammation in organs of severe and critical patients. Finally, we identified potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of COVID-19 and its deleterious effects on organs. Further experimental investigation would conclusively determine the effects of COVID-19 infection on organs other than the lungs and the effectiveness of the proposed therapeutic targets.

4.
Journal of Foodservice Business Research ; : 1-29, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1541446

ABSTRACT

To systematically investigate factors affecting consumers’ restaurant patronage decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study drew on the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) to (1) evaluate how threat and coping appraisal (i.e., PMT factors) may vary based on socio-demographics and COVID-19 situational characteristics, and (2) determine if PMT factors influence actual restaurant patronage behaviors. Furthermore, the current study examined consumers’ perceptions of health-protective actions that restaurateurs could take to minimize consumer risk of contracting COVID-19. Data were collected from U.S. adults (N = 627) using an online crowdsourcing platform in early May 2020. Findings showed significant relationships between socio-demograhic factors and perceived severity and/or vulnerability to COVID-19, along with concerns of coping with the virus for in-restaurant dining. For take-out/delivery patronage, coping concerns were greater for those with lower education levels and those with more health concerns than their counterparts. Furthermore, consumers’ higher levels of coping appraisal predicted their higher take-out/delivery frequency. Results also suggested actions that restaurateurs could take that would influence consumers’ restaurant patronage decisions. This study provides new insights related to PMT in the context of restaurants in a pandemic situation and practical information for restaurateurs to recover and prepare for future pandemics or similar crises. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Foodservice Business Research is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293017

ABSTRACT

Background: Carceral facilities are high-risk settings for COVID-19 transmission. Understanding of factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy among incarcerated individuals is incomplete, especially for people living in jails. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of COVID-19 vaccination data from the electronic health record (EHR) of residents in two Northern California county jails to examine factors associated with vaccine uptake in this population. We additionally administered a survey in four jails to assess reasons for vaccine hesitancy, sources of COVID-19 information, and medical mistrust. We performed multivariate logistic regression to determine associations with vaccine uptake or hesitancy. Results: Of 2,584 jail residents offered a COVID-19 vaccine between March 19, 2021 and June 30, 2021, 1,464 (56.7%) accepted at least one dose. Among vaccinated residents, 538 (36.7%) initially refused the vaccine. Vaccine uptake was higher among older individuals, women, those with recent flu vaccination, and those living in shared cells or open dorms. Leading reasons for vaccine hesitancy included concerns around side effects and suboptimal efficacy. Television and friends/family were the most commonly cited and the most trusted sources of COVID-19 information, respectively. Vaccine acceptance was associated with increased trust in COVID-19 information sources and in medical personnel both in and out of jail. Conclusion: Ongoing evidence-based COVID-19 vaccination efforts are needed in high-risk carceral settings. Effective interventions to improve vaccination rates in this population should utilize accessible and trusted sources of information to address concerns about vaccine side effects and efficacy and foster medical trust.

6.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 33(11):3996-4016, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1517962

ABSTRACT

PurposeOff-premise restaurant service has a new addition – food delivery robots. This new technology and off-premise service, in general, has received little research attention, despite continued year-over-year sales growth for both carry-out and delivery. Therefore, this study aims to analyze off-premise service modes, including food delivery robots, for service quality gaps between consumer expectations and actual performance and among the various modes.Design/methodology/approachPerformance of three off-premise restaurant service modes (robot-delivery, human-delivery and carry-out) were evaluated using a mixed-methods approach. Consumer expectations were ascertained about food- and service-related performance factors using a survey, and a field observation study was conducted to obtain actual performance data for these factors. Findings from both approaches were compared to identify gaps and differences.FindingsFor food-related performance, consumers reported lower expectations for food safety and food quality from robot- and human-delivered food;however, no differences were observed among the three modes in the field study. Consumers also expected lower service-related performance from robot-delivery for service efficiency and ease of use (than human-delivery and carry-out) and monetary value (than carry-out). Consumers deemed robots the most sustainable and human-delivery the most convenient compared to other modes – however, not all service-related expectations aligned with actual performances.Originality/valueThis study was the first to comparatively examine off-premise restaurant service. Identification of a missing link in service gap analysis was among the theoretical contributions of this study. Managerially, this study provides previously unavailable insights into opportunities for improvement for off-premise service and use of delivery robots.

7.
Immunity ; 54(4): 753-768.e5, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385739

ABSTRACT

Viral infections induce a conserved host response distinct from bacterial infections. We hypothesized that the conserved response is associated with disease severity and is distinct between patients with different outcomes. To test this, we integrated 4,780 blood transcriptome profiles from patients aged 0 to 90 years infected with one of 16 viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, Ebola, chikungunya, and influenza, across 34 cohorts from 18 countries, and single-cell RNA sequencing profiles of 702,970 immune cells from 289 samples across three cohorts. Severe viral infection was associated with increased hematopoiesis, myelopoiesis, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We identified protective and detrimental gene modules that defined distinct trajectories associated with mild versus severe outcomes. The interferon response was decoupled from the protective host response in patients with severe outcomes. These findings were consistent, irrespective of age and virus, and provide insights to accelerate the development of diagnostics and host-directed therapies to improve global pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
Immunity/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Antigen Presentation/genetics , Cohort Studies , Hematopoiesis/genetics , Humans , Interferons/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/pathology , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index , Systems Biology , Transcriptome , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/classification , Virus Diseases/genetics , Viruses/classification , Viruses/pathogenicity
9.
Int J Hosp Manag ; 94: 102821, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184996

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent U.S. in-restaurant dining restrictions deleteriously affected the restaurant industry. While dining restrictions were adopted to prevent human contact, evidence suggests that consumers may mistakenly perceive that restaurant "food" and its "packaging" are risky sources of COVID-19. To explore consumers' COVID-19 risk perceptions about food itself, restaurant food specifically, and restaurant food packaging, this study collected nationwide U.S. consumer survey data (n = 958) using an online consumer panel. Findings showed that: (1) consumers were less concerned about contracting COVID-19 from food in general than restaurant food and its packaging, with consumer restaurant concern highest for food served in restaurants, and lowest for hot/cooked restaurant food followed by restaurant food from carry-out; and (2) the risk perceptions of consumers varied with financial concern for food, gender, and being in a high-risk category of COVID-19. Implications for researchers, restauranteurs, government, and food safety professionals are discussed.

10.
Int J Hosp Manag ; 94: 102821, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988009

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent U.S. in-restaurant dining restrictions deleteriously affected the restaurant industry. While dining restrictions were adopted to prevent human contact, evidence suggests that consumers may mistakenly perceive that restaurant "food" and its "packaging" are risky sources of COVID-19. To explore consumers' COVID-19 risk perceptions about food itself, restaurant food specifically, and restaurant food packaging, this study collected nationwide U.S. consumer survey data (n = 958) using an online consumer panel. Findings showed that: (1) consumers were less concerned about contracting COVID-19 from food in general than restaurant food and its packaging, with consumer restaurant concern highest for food served in restaurants, and lowest for hot/cooked restaurant food followed by restaurant food from carry-out; and (2) the risk perceptions of consumers varied with financial concern for food, gender, and being in a high-risk category of COVID-19. Implications for researchers, restauranteurs, government, and food safety professionals are discussed.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...