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1.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 876995, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847225

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19)-related depression symptoms of healthcare workers have received worldwide recognition. Although many studies identified risk exposures associated with depression symptoms among healthcare workers, few have focused on a predictive model using machine learning methods. As a society, governments, and organizations are concerned about the need for immediate interventions and alert systems for healthcare workers who are mentally at-risk. This study aims to develop and validate machine learning-based models for predicting depression symptoms using survey data collected during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. Method: Surveys were conducted of 2,574 healthcare workers in hospitals designated to care for COVID-19 patients between 20 January and 11 February 2020. The patient health questionnaire (PHQ)-9 was used to measure the depression symptoms and quantify the severity, a score of ≥5 on the PHQ-9 represented depression symptoms positive, respectively. Four machine learning approaches were trained (75% of data) and tested (25% of data). Cross-validation with 100 repetitions was applied to the training dataset for hyperparameter tuning. Finally, all models were compared to evaluate their predictive performances and screening utility: decision tree, logistics regression with least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), random forest, and gradient-boosting tree. Results: Important risk predictors identified and ranked by the machine learning models were highly consistent: self-perceived health status factors always occupied the top five most important predictors, followed by worried about infection, working on the frontline, a very high level of uncertainty, having received any form of psychological support material and having COVID-19-like symptoms. The area under the curve [95% CI] of machine learning models were as follows: LASSO model, 0.824 [0.792-0.856]; random forest, 0.828 [0.797-0.859]; gradient-boosting tree, 0.829 [0.798-0.861]; and decision tree, 0.785 [0.752-0.819]. The calibration plot indicated that the LASSO model, random forest, and gradient-boosting tree fit the data well. Decision curve analysis showed that all models obtained net benefits for predicting depression symptoms. Conclusions: This study shows that machine learning prediction models are suitable for making predictions about mentally at-risk healthcare workers predictions in a public health emergency setting. The application of multidimensional machine learning models could support hospitals' and healthcare workers' decision-making on possible psychological interventions and proper mental health management.

2.
China CDC Wkly ; 4(18): 389-392, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1836650

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic?: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses a significant threat to mental health globally and may change the proportion of hospitalized patients. What is added by this report?: This report analyzed and compared the disease characteristics of psychiatric inpatients one year before and after Wuhan lifted lockdown during COVID-19. About 50% of the inpatients were diagnosed with bipolar disorder; females and adolescents had a higher prevalence of mental disorders. What are the implications for public health practice?: More attention should be paid to the mental health of children, adolescents, and females.

3.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(6): 1949-1959, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819919

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to investigate eHealth literacy about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among older adults during the pandemic. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic promoted the development of online health care. Higher demand for accessing information from the Internet was seen. METHODS: This was a sequential explanatory mixed-method study, involving a survey of older adults to explore the status and influencing factors of eHealth literacy regarding COVID-19. Semi-structured interviews were used to understand experiences and challenges regarding information retrieval, judgment and utilization. RESULTS: A total of 337 older adults participated in the online questionnaire survey. Overall, older adults had slightly higher scores on eHealth literacy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants' location in the past month and current health issues were associated with eHealth literacy. Qualitative data were collected from nine older adults and included that some older adults retrieved health-related information during the pandemic. However, those who used non-smartphones described difficulties in information retrieval. A glut of misinformation has resulted in an 'infodemic', which has not only increased the difficulty of judging information but also posed challenges in information utilization for older adults. CONCLUSION: Improving older adults' eHealth literacy is essential in promoting an improved response to major public health events and in providing better health care for this group in the future. It is essential that government health agencies and health care providers provide evidence-based health information via social media platforms. Further efforts are needed to combine aspects of traditional and online health care services and provide reliable and updated online information and resources for older adults. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Providing evidence to eHealth literacy improvement and health management of older adults in the context of public health events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electronics , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Comput Inform Nurs ; 2022 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806654

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has become a leading societal concern. eHealth literacy is important in the prevention and control of this pandemic. The purpose of this study is to identify eHealth literacy of Chinese residents about the COVID-19 pandemic and factors influencing eHealth literacy. A total of 15 694 individuals clicked on the link to the questionnaire, and 15 000 agreed to participate and completed the questionnaire for a response rate of 95.58%. Descriptive statistics, χ2 test, and logistic regression analysis were conducted to analyze participants' level of eHealth literacy about COVID-19 and its influencing factors. The results showed 52.2% of participants had relatively lower eHealth literacy regarding COVID-19 (eHealth literacy score ≤ 48). The scores of the information judgment dimension (3.09 ± 0.71) and information utilization dimension (3.18 ± 0.67) of the eHealth literacy scale were relatively lower. The logistics regression showed that sex, age, education level, level of uncertainty, having people around the respondent diagnosed with COVID-19, relationship with family, and relationship with others were associated to eHealth literacy (χ2 = 969.135, P < .001). The public's eHealth literacy about COVID-19 needs to be improved, especially the ability to judge and utilize online information. Close collaboration among global health agencies, governments, healthcare institutions, and media is needed to provide reliable online information to the public. Interventions to improve eHealth literacy should take into account and accentuate the importance of sex, age, educational background, level of uncertainty, exposure to disease, and social support.

5.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 11-17, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719332

ABSTRACT

The severe 2019 outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, would be expected to impact the mental health of local medical and nursing staff and thus lead them to seek help. However, those outcomes have yet to be established using epidemiological data. To explore the mental health status of medical and nursing staff and the efficacy, or lack thereof, of critically connecting psychological needs to receiving psychological care, we conducted a quantitative study. This is the first paper on the mental health of medical and nursing staff in Wuhan. Notably, among 994 medical and nursing staff working in Wuhan, 36.9% had subthreshold mental health disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 2.4), 34.4% had mild disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 5.4), 22.4% had moderate disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 9.0), and 6.2% had severe disturbance (mean PHQ-9: 15.1) in the immediate wake of the viral epidemic. The noted burden fell particularly heavily on young women. Of all participants, 36.3% had accessed psychological materials (such as books on mental health), 50.4% had accessed psychological resources available through media (such as online push messages on mental health self-help coping methods), and 17.5% had participated in counseling or psychotherapy. Trends in levels of psychological distress and factors such as exposure to infected people and psychological assistance were identified. Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions. These findings emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Mental Health Services , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315261

ABSTRACT

Background: Given that 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads rapidly, it is critical to make rapid and accurate detection of COVID-19 patients towards containment of SARS-CoV-2 virus. At present, COVID-19 patients are mainly identified through viral nuclear acid testing (NAT). However, factors such as time for patients being tested, experience of test operators, and specimen’s preparation, might affect the accuracy of testing results. The purpose of this study was to use different classification and feature selection methods to improve the diagnostic accuracy of COVID-19 patients. Methods: We utilized seven machine learning algorithms for assisting diagnosis of COVID-19 by developing a non-NAT algorithm. In order to reduce the number of input features while maintaining the models’ performance so as to decrease the cost and time consumption, we adopted three algorithms, such as Chi-square test, variance analysis, and feature importance tests to identify the optimal feature sets. Findings: The XGBoost and RF models displayed the best performance for COVID-19 detection, with the highest accuracy rate more than 0·96. The accuracy of RF model was 0·968 when using only ten hematological features and body temperature. Interpretation: Ten blood features and body temperature can fairly accurately determine whether a suspected patient is infected with COVID-19. Our model can improve the diagnostic accuracy of COVID-19 and reduce the spread. Funding: This work is supported by grants from the National Key Research and Development Program of China under Grant 2017YFE0123600, the Natural Science Foundation of China (81873931, 81974382 and 81773104), the Frontier Exploration Program of Huazhong University of Science and Technology (2015TS153), and the Major Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects in Hubei Province (2018ACA136).Declaration of Interests: All the authors stated that the paper had never been published elsewhere, and that there were no competing economic interests.Ethics Approval Statement: The collection, use, and retrospective analysis of chest CT images, CFs and SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid PCR results of patients were approved by the institutional ethical committees of HUST-UH (IRB ID: [2020] IEC(A001)).

7.
J Affect Disord ; 304: 12-19, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683225

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Trauma experience increases the risk of suicidal ideation, but little is known about potentially psychological mechanisms underlying this relationship. This study aims to examine the relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related traumatic event (CTE) exposure and suicidal ideation among hospital workers, and identify mediating roles of sleep disturbances in this relationship. METHODS: Workers in seven designated hospitals in Wuhan, China, were invited to participate in an online survey from May 27, 2020, to July 31, 2020. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire to evaluate demographic characteristics, level of CTE exposures, nightmare frequency, insomnia severity, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and suicidal ideation. A series of correlation analyses were performed, and a mediation model was generated to examine correlations between CTE exposure, sleep disturbances, and suicidal ideation. RESULTS: A total of 16,220 hospital workers were included in the final analysis, 13.3% of them reported suicidal ideation in the past month. CTE exposure was significantly associated with insomnia severity, nightmare frequency, and suicidal ideation. After controlling potential confounders, nightmares but not insomnia, depression, or anxiety were shown to be independent risk factors for suicidal ideation. Pathway analyses showed that the relationship between CTE exposure and suicidal ideation was fully mediated by nightmares (proportion mediated 66.4%) after adjusting for demographic characteristics and psychological confounders. LIMITATIONS: Cross-sectional design precluded the investigation of causal relationships. CONCLUSIONS: CTE exposure increases risk of hospital workers' suicidal ideation that is mediated by nightmares, suggesting nightmares intervention might be considered as a component when developing suicide prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dreams/psychology , Humans , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Suicidal Ideation
8.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 28(1): e13034, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583544

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study aimed to describe the experiences of nurses and other health care workers who were infected with coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: An empirical phenomenological approach was used. Sixteen participants were recruited in Wuhan using purposive and snowball sampling. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted by telephone in February 2020. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed following Colaizzi's method. RESULTS: Two themes emerged: (1) Intense emotional distress since becoming infected. Participants were fearful of spreading the virus to family and overwhelmed by a lack of information, experienced uncertainty and worried about treatment, felt lonely during isolation and reported moral distress about inadequate health care staffing. (2) Coping strategies were needed. They tried their best to address negative psychological reactions using their professional knowledge and gaining support from others and community resources. CONCLUSIONS: Preparedness for catastrophic events and providing timely and accurate information are major considerations in government policy development, related to pandemics and adequacy of health care personnel. Mental health resources and support, both short- and long-term should be anticipated for health care providers to alleviate their fear and anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 499, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447296

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused large-scale economic and social losses and worldwide deaths. Although most COVID-19 patients have initially complained of respiratory insufficiency, the presence of neuropsychiatric manifestations is also reported frequently, ranging from headache, hyposmia/anosmia, and neuromuscular dysfunction to stroke, seizure, encephalopathy, altered mental status, and psychiatric disorders, both in the acute phase and in the long term. These neuropsychiatric complications have emerged as a potential indicator of worsened clinical outcomes and poor prognosis, thus contributing to mortality in COVID-19 patients. Their etiology remains largely unclear and probably involves multiple neuroinvasive pathways. Here, we summarize recent animal and human studies for neurotrophic properties of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and elucidate potential neuropathogenic mechanisms involved in the viral invasion of the central nervous system as a cause for brain damage and neurological impairments. We then discuss the potential therapeutic strategy for intervening and preventing neuropsychiatric complications associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Time-series monitoring of clinical-neurochemical-radiological progress of neuropsychiatric and neuroimmune complications need implementation in individuals exposed to SARS-CoV-2. The development of a screening, intervention, and therapeutic framework to prevent and reduce neuropsychiatric sequela is urgently needed and crucial for the short- and long-term recovery of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Headache , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
10.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 690295, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305691

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have an impact on the psychological distress of organ transplant recipients. We aimed to assess the status of psychological distress and its association with quality of life (QoL) in organ transplant recipients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 305 organ transplant recipients during March 30 and April 2, 2020, in Wuhan. Psychological distress comprised depression, anxiety, insomnia, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, and Impact of event scale-revised. QoL was assessed using the Chinese version of the short Form 36-item health survey. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and PTSD in organ transplant recipients was 13.4, 6.9, 11.8, and 30.5%, respectively. Organ transplant recipients with depression had significantly lower scores in all eight dimensions of QoL compared with participants without depression (all p < 0.05). Lower scores on the QoL dimensions of role physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, role emotional, and mental health were found in organ transplant recipients with anxiety, insomnia, or PTSD compared with their counterparts without the respective disorder (all p < 0.05). Limitation: The cross-sectional study design limited us to make causal conclusion and the influence of potential confounders cannot be ruled out. Conclusions: Psychological distress was prevalent in organ transplant recipients during the COVID-19 pandemic, and those with depression, anxiety, insomnia, and PTSD had poorer QoL. Therefore, timely psychological counseling, COVID-19 related health education, and essential community medical services should be provided to organ transplant recipients to relieve their psychological distress, and to improve their QoL.

11.
Nat Sci Sleep ; 13: 703-712, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262570

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The prevalence rate and related factors of insomnia remained unknown after the COVID-19 epidemic had been under control. Therefore, we conducted this survey to investigate the prevalence rate and related factors of insomnia symptoms in the Chinese general public after the COVID-19 had been initially control. METHODS: An online survey was conducted among Chinese citizens through the JD Health APP. The questionnaire was used for collecting demographic data and self-designed questions related to the COVID-19 outbreak. Insomnia Severity Index, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Somatic Symptom Scale-8 and Impact of Events Scale-Revised were used for measuring psychological symptoms. To examine the associations of sociodemographic and psychological factors with insomnia symptoms, a binary logistic regression was used. RESULTS: In total, there were 14,894 eligible participants, and 4601 (30.9%) participants were found to have insomnia symptoms. The regression model revealed that a higher risk of insomnia symptoms was associated with being over the age of 40 years, having history of psychiatric disorders, smoking, having infected friends or colleagues, having depressive or somatic symptoms, experiencing psychological distress and feeling estranged from family members. Meanwhile a lower risk of insomnia symptoms was associated with being female, having closer family relationships, not feeling alienated from others and being satisfied with the available information. CONCLUSION: In our study, 30.9% of the participants in the general public reported insomnia symptoms after the COVID-19 epidemic had been initially controlled. When providing precise interventions for insomnia, extra attention should be paid to the individuals who are male, elderly and smokers, and those with psychiatric disorder history, with infected friends or colleagues, with psychological symptoms and with poor social support.

12.
IEEE Trans Netw Sci Eng ; 9(1): 247-257, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238354

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus(COVID-19) spreads rapidly, and the large-scale infection leads to the lack of medical resources. For the purpose of providing more reasonable medical service to COVID-19 patients, we designed an novel adjuvant therapy system integrating warning, therapy, and post-therapy psychological intervention. The system combines data analysis, communication networks and artificial intelligence(AI) to design a guidance framework for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Specifically, in this system, we first can use blood characteristic data to help make a definite diagnosis and classify the patients. Then, the classification results, together with the blood characteristics and underlying diseases disease characteristics of the patient, can be used to assist the doctor in treat treating the patient according to AI algorithms. Moreover, after the patient is discharged from the hospital, the system can monitor the psychological and physiological state at the data collection layer. And in the data feedback layer, this system can analyze the data and report the abnormalities of the patient to the doctor through communication network. Experiments show the effectiveness of our proposed system.

13.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e047828, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225708

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the magnitude of mental health outcomes and associated factors among psychiatric professionals in mental health services during COVID-19 in China. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This cross-sectional, survey-based, region-stratified study collected demographic data and mental health measurements from psychiatric professionals in 34 hospitals between 29 January and 7 February 2020, in China. Hospitals equipped with fever clinics or deployed on wards for patients with COVID-19 were eligible. PRIMARY OUTCOME AND MEASURES: The severity of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and distress were assessed by the Chinese versions of 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, 7-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder, 7-item Insomnia Severity Index and 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression and structural equation modelling was performed to identify factors associated with mental health outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 610 psychiatric professionals were included. 29.8% were employed in Wuhan, and 22.5% were frontline workers. A considerable proportion of participants reported symptoms of depression (461 (75.6%)), anxiety (282 (46.2%)), insomnia (336 (55.1%)) and mental stress (481 (78.9%)). Psychiatric symptoms were associated with worrying about infection (eg, OR 2.36 (95% CI 1.27 to 4.39) for anxiety), risks of exposure to COVID-19 (eg, having inadequate personal protection equipment, OR 2.43 (1.32 to 4.47) for depression) and self-perceived physical health (eg, OR 3.22 (2.24 to 4.64) for mental stress). Information sources of COVID-19 were also found to be both positively (eg, information from relatives, OR 2.16 (1.46 to 3.21) for mental stress) and negatively (eg, information from TV, OR 0.52 (0.35 to 0.77) for mental stress) associated with mental stress. There is preliminary evidence that mental health might benefit from greater availability of mental healthcare services. The structural equation model analysis indicated that worrying about infection may be the primary mediator via which risk of exposure to COVID-19 pandemic affects the mental health of psychiatric professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The current findings demonstrate several pathways via which the COVID-19 pandemic may have negatively affected the mental health of psychiatric professionals in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Internet , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
14.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 553021, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170126

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of COVID-19 occurred in 2020 which resulted in high levels of psychological stress in both the general public and healthcare providers. Purpose: The study aimed to address the mental health status of people in China in the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak, and to identify differences among the general public, frontline, and non-frontline healthcare providers. Method: A cross-sectional study was used to identify the mental health status of the general public and healthcare providers between Jan 29 and Feb 11, 2020. Data were collected using an online survey from a convenience sample. The instruments used included: Patient Health Questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the data. Kruskal-Wallis H tests were performed to assess differences in measurements among the three groups; P < 0.05 (two-sided) was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Results showed that a majority of participants experienced post-traumatic stress (68.8%), depression (46.1%), anxiety (39.8%), and insomnia (31.4%). Significant changes in the mental health status of frontline providers was found as compared to those of the other groups (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the scores of the general public were significantly higher than those of the non-frontline healthcare providers (P < 0.001). Conclusion: These findings provide information to evaluate outbreak associated psychological stress for the general public and healthcare providers, and assist in providing professional support and actionable guidance to ease psychological stress and improve mental health.

15.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 262, 2021 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The association of workplace factors on mental health of healthcare workers (HCWs) during the COVID-19 pandemic needs to be urgently established. This will enable governments and policy-makers to make evidence-based decisions. This international study reports the association between workplace factors and the mental health of HCWs during the pandemic. METHODS: An international, cross-sectional study was conducted in 41 countries. The primary outcome was depressive symptoms, derived from the validated Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2). Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with mental health outcomes. Inter-country differences were also evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 2527 responses were received, from 41 countries, including China (n = 1213; 48.0%), UK (n = 891; 35.3%), and USA (n = 252; 10.0%). Of all participants, 1343 (57.1%) were aged 26 to 40 years, and 2021 (80.0%) were female; 874 (34.6%) were doctors, and 1367 (54.1%) were nurses. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of depressive symptoms were: working in the UK (OR = 3.63; CI = [2.90-4.54]; p < 0.001) and USA (OR = 4.10; CI = [3.03-5.54]), p < 0.001); being female (OR = 1.74; CI = [1.42-2.13]; p < 0.001); being a nurse (OR = 1.64; CI = [1.34-2.01]; p < 0.001); and caring for a COVID-19 positive patient who subsequently died (OR = 1.20; CI = [1.01-1.43]; p = 0.040). Workplace factors associated with depressive symptoms were: redeployment to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) (OR = 1.67; CI = [1.14-2.46]; p = 0.009); redeployment with perceived unsatisfactory training (OR = 1.67; CI = [1.32-2.11]; p < 0.001); not being issued with appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) (OR = 2.49; CI = [2.03-3.04]; p < 0.001); perceived poor workplace support within area/specialty (OR = 2.49; CI = [2.03-3.04]; p < 0.001); and perceived poor mental health support (OR = 1.63; CI = [1.38-1.92]; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This is the first international study, demonstrating that workplace factors, including PPE availability, staff training pre-redeployment, and provision of mental health support, are significantly associated with mental health during COVID-19. Governments, policy-makers and other stakeholders need to ensure provision of these to safeguard HCWs' mental health, for future waves and other pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Workplace/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Psychiatr Res ; 137: 393-400, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135471

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed both physical and psychological burdens on healthcare workers (HCWs). What is more, few studies have focused on the gender differences in mental health problems (MHPs) among HCWs during such an outbreak. Thus, the current study investigated the prevalence and gender differences of various MHPs among HCWs in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. This nationwide survey was conducted online from January 29 to February 3, 2020. General information was collected by questions about socio-demographics, work-related factors, and living situations. Depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. Among the 2198 contacted HCWs, 1563 (71.1%) responded with valid data, of whom 1293 (82.7%) were females. The prevalences of depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms in participants were 50.7%, 44.7%, 52.5%, and 36.1%, respectively. Female HCWs had significantly higher scores in all four scales (p < 0.001) and higher prevalences in all MHPs involved (range, odds ratio [OR] 1.55-1.97). After adjusting for potential confounders, female HCWs still had higher risks for all MHPs involved than males (range, adjusted OR 1.36-1.96). HCWs present high prevalences of depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms during the COVID-19 outbreak. Furthermore, female HCWs are more vulnerable to all MHPs involved. These findings highlight the need for timely, special care and support for HCWs during the outbreak, especially for females.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
Front Psychiatry ; 11: 559701, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004701

ABSTRACT

Objective: During the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic in China, breast cancer (BC) patients and healthcare workers faced several challenges, resulting in great psychological stress. We measured the psychological status of BC patients and female nurses and compared the severity within the two groups at the peak time-point of the COVID-19 outbreak. Methods: A total of 207 BC patients and 684 female nurses were recruited from Wuhan. They completed an anonymous questionnaire online using the most popular social media software in China, WeChat. The psychological status of BC patients and of female nurses was measured using the Chinese versions of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), the 7-item Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and the 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) for evaluation of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The differences between the two groups were analyzed. Results: The scores of BC patients and frontline female nurses for the four scales were significantly higher than those of non-frontline female nurses (P < 0.001). There were similar scores between BC patients and frontline female nurses for PHQ-9, GAD-7, and IES-R (P = 0.789, P = 0.101, P = 0.158, respectively). Notably, the scores of BC patients for ISI were significantly higher than those of the frontline female nurses (P = 0.016). A considerable proportion of BC patients reported symptoms of depression (106/207, 51.2%), anxiety (130/207, 62.8%), insomnia (106/207, 51.2%), and PTSD (73/207, 35.5%), which was more severe than that of female nurses. Conclusions: BC patients experienced great psychological pressure during the COVID-19 outbreak. The incidents of symptomatic anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, and PTSD were significantly comparable to that of frontline female nurses, and episodes of insomnia among BC participants were more serious than for frontline female nurses.

18.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(4): 805-812, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991599

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To investigate the eHealth literacy and the psychological status of Chinese residents during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore their interrelationship. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has placed intense psychological pressure on community residents. Their psychological status may be affected by eHealth literacy due to home isolation during this rampant pandemic. METHODS: This is a Web-based cross-sectional survey conducted on the JD Health platform, which resulted in 15,000 respondents having participated in this survey. The eHealth Literacy Questionnaire (EHLQ), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) were used. The Pearson correlation was used to analyse the relationship between eHealth literacy and depression, insomnia and post-traumatic stress disorder. RESULTS: The score of eHealth literacy was 48.88 ± 8.46, and 11.4%, 6.8% and 20.1% of respondents experienced moderate to severe depression, insomnia and post-traumatic stress disorder. eHealth literacy negatively correlated with depression (r = -0.331), insomnia (r = -0.366) and post-traumatic stress disorder (r = -0.320). CONCLUSION: eHealth literacy is closely related to psychological status. Improving eHealth literacy may contribute to maintaining good psychological well-being. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: It is necessary to strengthen the education of primary health care providers to enhance their ability to help community residents effectively use eHealth information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Mental Disorders , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 348, 2020 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867547

ABSTRACT

To study the acute psychological effects of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak among healthcare workers (HCWs) in China, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among HCWs during the early period of COVID-19 outbreak. The acute psychological effects including symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire, and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and PTSD was estimated at 15.0%, 27.1%, and 9.8%, respectively. Having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, receiving insufficient training for protection, and lacking confidence in protection measures were significantly associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Being a nurse, having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, and lacking confidence in protection measures were risk factors for PTSD. Meanwhile, not worrying about infection was a protective factor for developing depression, anxiety, and PTSD. Psychological interventions should be implemented among HCWs during the COVID-19 outbreak to reduce acute psychological effects and prevent long-term psychological comorbidities. Meanwhile, HCWs should be well trained and well protected before their frontline exposure.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-532

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused not only extraordinary public health concerns but also tremendous psychological dis

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