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1.
Front Oncol ; 12: 855723, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775732

ABSTRACT

Background: Frail patients are considered at relevant risk of complications due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and, for this reason, are prioritized candidates for vaccination. As these patients were originally not included in the registration trials, fear related to vaccine adverse events and disease worsening was one of the reasons for vaccine hesitancy. Herein, we report the safety profile of the prospective, multicenter, national VAX4FRAIL study (NCT04848493) to evaluate vaccines in a large trans-disease cohort of patients with solid or hematological malignancies and neurological and rheumatological diseases. Methods: Between March 3 and September 2, 2021, 566 patients were evaluable for safety endpoint: 105 received the mRNA-1273 vaccine and 461 the BNT162b2 vaccine. Frail patients were defined per protocol as patients under treatment with hematological malignancies (n = 131), solid tumors (n = 191), immune-rheumatological diseases (n = 86), and neurological diseases (n = 158), including multiple sclerosis and generalized myasthenia. The impact of the vaccination on the health status of patients was assessed through a questionnaire focused on the first week after each vaccine dose. Results: The most frequently reported moderate-severe adverse events were pain at the injection site (60.3% after the first dose, 55.4% after the second), fatigue (30.1%-41.7%), bone pain (27.4%-27.2%), and headache (11.8%-18.9%). Risk factors associated with the occurrence of severe symptoms after vaccine administration were identified through a multivariate logistic regression analysis: age was associated with severe fever presentation (younger patients vs. middle-aged vs. older ones), female individuals presented a higher probability of severe pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, and bone pain; and the mRNA-1237 vaccine was associated with a higher probability of severe pain at the injection site and fever. After the first dose, patients presenting a severe symptom were at a relevant risk of recurrence of the same severe symptom after the second one. Overall, 11 patients (1.9%) after the first dose and 7 (1.2%) after the second one required postponement or suspension of the disease-specific treatment. Finally, two fatal events occurred among our 566 patients. These two events were considered unrelated to the vaccine. Conclusions: Our study reports that mRNA-COVID-19 vaccination is safe also in frail patients; as expected, side effects were manageable and had a minimum impact on patient care path.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-317957

ABSTRACT

In January 2020, the novel Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) epidemic spread to Italy. The ensuing high rates of patients with pulmonary disease due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections, overwhelmed the Italian health services. Management of inpatients was based on World Health Organization (WHO) and other public health bodies’ and specialist societies’ clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic protocols developed with very low-quality evidence base at that time. Over time, management guidelines and protocols were progressively modified and adapted based on the evolving first hand clinical management experience, and the evidence, which has slowly accumulated from clinical large cohort studies and clinical trials. As of August 9th, 2020, there have been 250.103 confirmed COVID-19 cases (with 35.203 deaths) reported from Italy. We present chronological evolution of the clinical and scientific evidence-based management guidelines to date, and their influence on the health care workers management of patients with COVID-19 disease.Funding Statement: This research was supported by funds to National Institute for Infectious Diseases ‘Lazzaro Spallanzani’ IRCCS from Line one-Ricerca Corrente ‘Infezioni Emergenti e Riemergenti’ and by Progetto COVID 2020 12371675 both funded by Italian Ministry of Health and from European Commission – Horizon 2020 (EXSCALATE4CoV).Sir Zumla and Prof Ippolito are co-PIs of the Pan-African Network on Emerging and Re-Emerging Infections (PANDORA-ID-NET – https://www.pandora-id.net/) funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership. Sir Zumla is in receipt of a National Institutes of Health Research senior investigator award.Declaration of Interests: EN received grants from Gilead science for educational purpose. Al other authors have no conflicts of interest to declareEthics Approval Statement: The authors stated that Ethical approval was not required.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314865

ABSTRACT

Background: More detailed temporal analyses of complete (Full) blood count (CBC) parameters, their evolution and relationship to patient age, gender, co-morbidities and management outcomes in survivors and non-survivors with COVID-19 disease could help identify prognostic clinical biomarkers. Methods: From 29 January 2020 until 28 March 2020, we performed a longitudinal cohort study of COVID-19 inpatients at the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy. Nine CBC parameters as a continuous variable were studied [neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, platelets, mean platelet volume, red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, mean red blood cell volume and red blood cell distribution width (RDW %)]. Model-based punctual estimates and difference between survivors and non-survivors, overall, and by co-morbidities, at specific times after symptoms, with relative 95% CI and P-values were obtained by marginal prediction and ANOVA-style joint tests. All analyses were carried out by STATA 15 statistical package. Main Findings: 379 COVID-19 patients [273 (72% were male;mean age was 61.67 (SD 15.60)] were enrolled and 1,805 measures per parameter were analysed. Neutrophil counts were on average significantly higher in non-survivors than in survivors (P<0.001) and lymphocytes were on average higher in survivors (P<0.001). These differences were time dependent. Reverse temporal trends were observed for lymphocyte and neutrophil counts in survivors and non-survivors. Average platelets counts (P<0.001) and median platelets volume (P<0.001) were significantly different in survivors and in non-survivors. The differences were time dependent and consistent with acute inflammation followed either by recovery or by death. Anaemia with anisocytosis were observed in the later phase of COVID-19 disease in non-survivors only. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with diabetes (p=0.005), obesity (p=0.010), chronic renal failure (p=0.001), COPD (p=0.033) cardiovascular diseases (p=0.001) and those >60 years(p=0.001). Age (p=0.042), obesity (p=0.002), chronic renal failure (p=0.002) and cardiovascular diseases (p=0.009) were independently associated with poor patient clinical outcome at 30 day after symptom onset. Interpretation: Increased neutrophil counts, reduced lymphocyte counts, higher median platelet volume, anemia with anisocytosis, in association with obesity, chronic renal failure, COPD, cardiovascular diseases and age >60 years predict poor prognosis in COVID19 patients.Funding Statement: Ricerca Corrente e Finalizzata Italy Ministry of Health, AIRC (IG2018-21880);Regione Lazio (Gruppi di ricerca, E56C18000460002).Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interest.Ethics Approval Statement: This study was approved by the IRB of Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani” (INMI), in Rome (Italy).

4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 815404, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674337

ABSTRACT

CVID patients have an increased susceptibility to vaccine-preventable infections. The question on the potential benefits of immunization of CVID patients against SARS-CoV-2 offered the possibility to analyze the defective mechanisms of immune responses to a novel antigen. In CVID, as in immunocompetent subjects, the role of B and T cells is different between infected and vaccinated individuals. Upon vaccination, variable anti-Spike IgG responses have been found in different CVID cohorts. Immunization with two doses of mRNA vaccine did not generate Spike-specific classical memory B cells (MBCs) but atypical memory B cells (ATM) with low binding capacity to Spike protein. Spike-specific T-cells responses were also induced in CVID patients with a variable frequency, differently from specific T cells produced after multiple exposures to viral antigens following influenza virus immunization and infection. The immune response elicited by SARS-CoV-2 infection was enhanced by subsequent immunization underlying the need to immunize convalescent COVID-19 CVID patients after recovery. In particular, immunization after SARS-Cov-2 infection generated Spike-specific classical memory B cells (MBCs) with low binding capacity to Spike protein and Spike-specific antibodies in a high percentage of CVID patients. The search for a strategy to elicit an adequate immune response post-vaccination in CVID patients is necessary. Since reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 has been documented, at present SARS-CoV-2 positive CVID patients might benefit from new preventing strategy based on administration of anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/complications , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunologic Memory , Male , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
5.
Cell Host Microbe ; 30(3): 400-408.e4, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650182

ABSTRACT

Breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infections in fully vaccinated individuals are considered a consequence of waning immunity. Serum antibodies represent the most measurable outcome of vaccine-induced B cell memory. When antibodies decline, memory B cells are expected to persist and perform their function, preventing clinical disease. We investigated whether BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine induces durable and functional B cell memory in vivo against SARS-CoV-2 3, 6, and 9 months after the second dose in a cohort of health care workers (HCWs). While we observed physiological decline of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies, memory B cells persist and increase until 9 months after immunization. HCWs with breakthrough infections had no signs of waning immunity. In 3-4 days, memory B cells responded to SARS-CoV-2 infection by producing high levels of specific antibodies in the serum and anti-Spike IgA in the saliva. Antibodies to the viral nucleoprotein were produced with the slow kinetics typical of the response to a novel antigen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic
6.
SSRN; 2021.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-292059

ABSTRACT

Background: Breakthrough infections in fully vaccinated HCWs are considered a marker of waning immunity. Serum antibodies represent the most visible and measurable outcome of vaccine-induced B-cell memory. When antibodies decline, memory B cells are expected to persist and perform their function, thus preventing clinical disease. We investigated whether BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine induces durable and in vivo functional B-cell memory against SARS-CoV-2 3, 6 and 9 months after the second dose. Methods: We assessed the duration of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immunity by measuring specific antibodies and memory B cells 3, 6 and 9 months after vaccination. In fully vaccinated HCWs with breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infections, we evaluated the humoral and mucosal response of vaccine-induced memory B cells. Findings: Whereas specific serum antibodies decline, anti-Spike memory B cells continue to increase until 9 months after the last vaccine dose. HCWs with breakthrough infections had no signs of waning immunity on the day of the first positive swab. In 3-4 days, memory B cells responded to SARS-CoV-2 infection by producing high levels of specific antibodies in the serum. In the saliva, anti-Spike IgA also rapidly increased in response to the infection. Antibodies to the viral nucleoprotein were produced with the slow kinetics typical of the response to a novel antigen. Interpretation: SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies physiologically decline months after vaccination. By contrast, memory B cells persist and increase over time. Parenteral administered vaccines do not generate mucosal immunity and serum antibodies reach mucosal sites in small amounts by transudation. In HCWs with SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections, memory B cells react by rapidly differentiating into antibody-producing cells and generating IgA for protection of mucosal sites.

7.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with primary antibody deficiencies are at risk in the current COVID-19 pandemic due to their impaired response to infection and vaccination. Specifically, patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) generated poor spike-specific antibody and T cell responses after immunization. METHODS: Thirty-four CVID convalescent patients after SARS-CoV-2 infection, 38 CVID patients immunized with two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine, and 20 SARS-CoV-2 CVID convalescents later and immunized with BNT162b2 were analyzed for the anti-spike IgG production and the generation of spike-specific memory B cells and T cells. RESULTS: Spike-specific IgG was induced more frequently after infection than after vaccination (82% vs. 34%). The antibody response was boosted in convalescents by vaccination. Although immunized patients generated atypical memory B cells possibly by extra-follicular or incomplete germinal center reactions, convalescents responded to infection by generating spike-specific memory B cells that were improved by the subsequent immunization. Poor spike-specific T cell responses were measured independently from the immunological challenge. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection primed a more efficient classical memory B cell response, whereas the BNT162b2 vaccine induced non-canonical B cell responses in CVID. Natural infection responses were boosted by subsequent immunization, suggesting the possibility to further stimulate the immune response by additional vaccine doses in CVID.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Convalescence , Female , Humans , Immunization , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/complications , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
8.
J Clin Immunol ; 41(8): 1709-1722, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474048

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data on immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 in patients with Primary Antibody Deficiencies (PAD) are limited to infected patients and to heterogeneous cohorts after immunization. METHODS: Forty-one patients with Common Variable Immune Deficiencies (CVID), six patients with X-linked Agammaglobulinemia (XLA), and 28 healthy age-matched controls (HD) were analyzed for anti-Spike and anti-receptor binding domain (RBD) antibody production, generation of Spike-specific memory B-cells, and Spike-specific T-cells before vaccination and one week after the second dose of BNT162b2 vaccine. RESULTS: The vaccine induced Spike-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses in all HD and in 20% of SARS-CoV-2 naive CVID patients. Anti-Spike IgG were detectable before vaccination in 4 out 7 CVID previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 and were boosted in six out of seven patients by the subsequent immunization raising higher levels than patients naïve to infection. While HD generated Spike-specific memory B-cells, and RBD-specific B-cells, CVID generated Spike-specific atypical B-cells, while RBD-specific B-cells were undetectable in all patients, indicating the incapability to generate this new specificity. Specific T-cell responses were evident in all HD and defective in 30% of CVID. All but one patient with XLA responded by specific T-cell only. CONCLUSION: In PAD patients, early atypical immune responses after BNT162b2 immunization occurred, possibly by extra-follicular or incomplete germinal center reactions. If these responses to vaccination might result in a partial protection from infection or reinfection is now unknown. Our data suggests that SARS-CoV-2 infection more effectively primes the immune response than the immunization alone, possibly suggesting the need for a third vaccine dose for patients not previously infected.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunologic Memory , Lymphocytes/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
10.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438527

ABSTRACT

Specific memory B cells and antibodies are a reliable read-out of vaccine efficacy. We analysed these biomarkers after one and two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine. The second dose significantly increases the level of highly specific memory B cells and antibodies. Two months after the second dose, specific antibody levels decline, but highly specific memory B cells continue to increase, thus predicting a sustained protection from COVID-19. We show that although mucosal IgA is not induced by the vaccination, memory B cells migrate in response to inflammation and secrete IgA at mucosal sites. We show that the first vaccine dose may lead to an insufficient number of highly specific memory B cells and low concentration of serum antibodies, thus leaving vaccinees without the immune robustness needed to ensure viral elimination and herd immunity. We also clarify that the reduction of serum antibodies does not diminish the force and duration of the immune protection induced by vaccination. The vaccine does not induce sterilizing immunity. Infection after vaccination may be caused by the lack of local preventive immunity because of the absence of mucosal IgA.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antigens, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cryopreservation , Female , Health Personnel , Healthy Volunteers , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lactation , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane/immunology , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 704110, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376699

ABSTRACT

Patients diagnosed with malignancy, neurological and immunological disorders, i.e., fragile patients, have been excluded from COVID-19 vaccine trials. However, this population may present immune response abnormalities, and relative reduced vaccine responsiveness. Here we review the limited current evidence on the immune responses to vaccination of patients with different underlying diseases. To address open questions we present the VAX4FRAIL study aimed at assessing immune responses to vaccination in a large transdisease cohort of patients with cancer, neurological and rheumatological diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Clinical Protocols , Humans , Immune System Diseases/immunology , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Nervous System Diseases/immunology , Patient Selection , Prospective Studies
12.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(8): 788, 2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356553

ABSTRACT

In the last months, many studies have clearly described several mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection at cell and tissue level, but the mechanisms of interaction between host and SARS-CoV-2, determining the grade of COVID-19 severity, are still unknown. We provide a network analysis on protein-protein interactions (PPI) between viral and host proteins to better identify host biological responses, induced by both whole proteome of SARS-CoV-2 and specific viral proteins. A host-virus interactome was inferred, applying an explorative algorithm (Random Walk with Restart, RWR) triggered by 28 proteins of SARS-CoV-2. The analysis of PPI allowed to estimate the distribution of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in the host cell. Interactome built around one single viral protein allowed to define a different response, underlining as ORF8 and ORF3a modulated cardiovascular diseases and pro-inflammatory pathways, respectively. Finally, the network-based approach highlighted a possible direct action of ORF3a and NS7b to enhancing Bradykinin Storm. This network-based representation of SARS-CoV-2 infection could be a framework for pathogenic evaluation of specific clinical outcomes. We identified possible host responses induced by specific proteins of SARS-CoV-2, underlining the important role of specific viral accessory proteins in pathogenic phenotypes of severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions , Immunity/immunology , Protein Interaction Maps/physiology , Proteome , Proteomics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism
13.
Viruses ; 12(10)2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: RT-PCR on nasopharyngeal (NPS)/oropharyngeal swabs is the gold standard for diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and viral load monitoring. Oral fluid (OF) is an alternate clinical sample, easy and safer to collect and could be useful for COVID-19 diagnosis, monitoring viral load and shedding. METHODS: Optimal assay conditions and analytical sensitivity were established for the commercial Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct assay adapted to OF matrix. The assay was used to test 337 OF and NPS specimens collected in parallel from 164 hospitalized patients; 50 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens from a subgroup of severe COVID-19 cases were also analysed. RESULTS: Using Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct on OF matrix, 100% analytical detection down to 1 TCID50/mL (corresponding to 4 × 103 copies (cp)/mL) was observed. No crossreaction with other viruses transmitted through the respiratory toute was observed. Parallel testing of 337 OF and NPS samples showed highly concordant results (κ = 0.831; 95 % CI = 0.771-0.891), and high correlation of Ct values (r = 0.921; p < 0.0001). High concordance and elevated correlation was observed also between OF and BAL. Prolonged viral RNA shedding was observed up to 100 days from symptoms onset (DSO), with 32% and 29% positivity observed in OF and NPS samples, respectively, collected between 60 and 100 DSO. CONCLUSIONS: Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct assays on OF have high sensitivity and specificity to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA and provide an alternative to NPS for diagnosis and monitoring SARS-CoV-2 shedding.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Virus Shedding/physiology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Body Fluids/virology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Pandemics , Pharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling , Viral Load
14.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2272-2275, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165366

ABSTRACT

Increased production of inflammatory cytokines and myeloid-derived suppressor cells occurs in patients with coronavirus disease 2019. These inversely correlated with perforin-expressing natural killer (NK) and CD3+ T cells. We observed a lower number of perforin-expressing NK cells in intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with non-ICU patients, suggesting an impairment of the immune cytotoxic arm as a pathogenic mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Inflammation/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Perforin/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/immunology , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Italy , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Curr Opin Pulm Med ; 27(3): 193-198, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101917

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The wide spectrum of COVID-19 clinical manifestations demonstrates the determinant role played by the individual immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the course of the disease. Thanks to the large number of published data, we are beginning to understand the logic of the human response to a virus adapted to bat immunity. RECENT FINDINGS: Impairment of types I and III interferon responses may facilitate the occurrence of severe COVID-19 with reduced antiviral activity associated to potent inflammation. The human T and B-cell germline repertoire contain the specificities able to react against SARS-CoV-2 antigens. Although inflammation disrupts the structure of germinal centers, memory T and B cells can be found in the blood of patients after mild and severe COVID 19. SUMMARY: Further studies are indispensable to better understand the human immune response to SARS-CoV-2. The diversity of the individual reaction may contribute to explain the clinical manifestation spectrum. Immunological memory can be demonstrated in patients, convalescent from mild, moderate, or severe COVID-19, but we do not know whether asymptomatic individuals have memory of the virus. Tailored vaccination protocols may be needed for individuals with previous SAS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Immunity/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Int J Infect Dis ; 105: 49-53, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071458

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: A dysregulated inflammatory profile plays an important role in coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pathogenesis. Moreover, the depletion of lymphocytes is typically associated with an unfavourable disease course. We studied the role and impact of p53 and deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) on lymph-monocyte homeostasis and their possible effect on T and B cell signalling. METHODS: Gene expression analysis and flow cytometry were performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 35 COVID-19 patients and 10 healthy donors (HD). Inflammatory cytokines, the frequency of Annexin+ cells among CD3+ T cells and CD19+ B cell subsets were quantified. RESULTS: PBMC from COVID-19 patients had a higher p53 expression, and higher concentrations of plasma proinflammatory cytokines (IL1ß, TNF-α, IL8, and IL6) than HD. Deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression was significantly decreased in COVID-19 patients and was negatively correlated with p53 (p = 0.003 and r = -0.48). A lower expression of IL-7R and B Cell linker (BLNK), key genes for lymphocyte homeostasis and function, was observed in COVID-19 than in HD. The reduction of IgK and IgL chains was seen in lymphopenic COVID-19 patients. A significant increase in both apoptotic B and T cells were observed. Inflammatory cytokines correlated positively with p53 (IL-1ß: r = 0.5 and p = 0.05; IL-8: r = 0.5 and p = 0.05) and negatively with SIRT1 (IL1-ß: r = -0.5 and p = 0.04; TNF-α: r = -0.4 and p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data indicate that the inflammatory environment, the dysregulated p53/SIRT1 axis and low expression of IL7R and BLNK may impact cell survival, B cell signalling and antibody production in COVID-19 patients. Further studies are required to define the functional impact of low BLNK/IL7R expression during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Homeostasis , Lymphocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sirtuin 1/physiology , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/physiology , Aged , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
18.
Front Immunol ; 11: 610300, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005638

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus, not encountered before by humans. The wide spectrum of clinical expression of SARS-CoV-2 illness suggests that individual immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 play a crucial role in determining the clinical course after first infection. Immunological studies have focused on patients with moderate to severe disease, demonstrating excessive inflammation in tissues and organ damage. In order to understand the basis of the protective immune response in COVID-19, we performed a longitudinal follow-up, flow-cytometric and serological analysis of innate and adaptive immunity in 64 adults with a spectrum of clinical presentations: 28 healthy SARS-CoV-2-negative contacts of COVID-19 cases; 20 asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2-infected cases; eight patients with Mild COVID-19 disease and eight cases of Severe COVID-19 disease. Our data show that high frequency of NK cells and early and transient increase of specific IgA, IgM and, to a lower extent, IgG are associated with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. By contrast, monocyte expansion and high and persistent levels of IgA and IgG, produced relatively late in the course of the infection, characterize severe disease. Modest increase of monocytes and different kinetics of antibodies are detected in mild COVID-19. The importance of innate NK cells and the short-lived antibody response of asymptomatic individuals and patients with mild disease suggest that only severe COVID-19 may result in protective memory established by the adaptive immune response.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Male , Severity of Illness Index
19.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0244129, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Detailed temporal analyses of complete (full) blood count (CBC) parameters, their evolution and relationship to patient age, gender, co-morbidities and management outcomes in survivors and non-survivors with COVID-19 disease, could identify prognostic clinical biomarkers. METHODS: From 29 January 2020 until 28 March 2020, we performed a longitudinal cohort study of COVID-19 inpatients at the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy. 9 CBC parameters were studied as continuous variables [neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, platelets, mean platelet volume, red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, mean red blood cell volume and red blood cell distribution width (RDW %)]. Model-based punctual estimates, as average of all patients' values, and differences between survivors and non-survivors, overall, and by co-morbidities, at specific times after symptoms, with relative 95% CI and P-values, were obtained by marginal prediction and ANOVA- style joint tests. All analyses were carried out by STATA 15 statistical package. MAIN FINDINGS: 379 COVID-19 patients [273 (72% were male; mean age was 61.67 (SD 15.60)] were enrolled and 1,805 measures per parameter were analysed. Neutrophils' counts were on average significantly higher in non-survivors than in survivors (P<0.001) and lymphocytes were on average higher in survivors (P<0.001). These differences were time dependent. Average platelets' counts (P<0.001) and median platelets' volume (P<0.001) were significantly different in survivors and non-survivors. The differences were time dependent and consistent with acute inflammation followed either by recovery or by death. Anaemia with anisocytosis was observed in the later phase of COVID-19 disease in non-survivors only. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with diabetes (OR = 3.28; 95%CI 1.51-7.13; p = 0.005), obesity (OR = 3.89; 95%CI 1.51-10.04; p = 0.010), chronic renal failure (OR = 9.23; 95%CI 3.49-24.36; p = 0.001), COPD (OR = 2.47; 95% IC 1.13-5.43; p = 0.033), cardiovascular diseases (OR = 4.46; 95%CI 2.25-8.86; p = 0.001), and those >60 years (OR = 4.21; 95%CI 1.82-9.77; p = 0.001). Age (OR = 2.59; 95%CI 1.04-6.45; p = 0.042), obesity (OR = 5.13; 95%CI 1.81-14.50; p = 0.002), renal chronic failure (OR = 5.20; 95%CI 1.80-14.97; p = 0.002) and cardiovascular diseases (OR 2.79; 95%CI 1.29-6.03; p = 0.009) were independently associated with poor clinical outcome at 30 days after symptoms' onset. INTERPRETATION: Increased neutrophil counts, reduced lymphocyte counts, increased median platelet volume and anaemia with anisocytosis, are poor prognostic indicators for COVID19, after adjusting for the confounding effect of obesity, chronic renal failure, COPD, cardiovascular diseases and age >60 years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Cell Count , COVID-19/immunology , Cohort Studies , Demography/methods , Erythrocyte Indices/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Leukocyte Count/methods , Longitudinal Studies , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Mean Platelet Volume/methods , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Prognosis , Rome , Survivors
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