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1.
Danish Medical Journal ; 69(5), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2309107

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Knowledge of the seroprevalence and duration of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 was needed in the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and is still necessary for policy makers and healthcare professionals. This information allows us to better understand the risk of reinfection in previously infected individuals. Methods. We investigated the prevalence and duration of detectable antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in sequentially collected samples from 379 healthcare professionals. Results. SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence at inclusion was 5.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-8.0%) and 25% of seropositive participants reverted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the calculated probability of having detectable antibodies among former seropositive participants was 72.2% (95% CI: 54.2-96.2%). Conclusion. Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detectable in a subset of infected individuals for a minimum of 39 weeks.

2.
Danish Medical Journal ; 69(5), 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1989656

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Knowledge of the seroprevalence and duration of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 was needed in the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and is still necessary for policy makers and healthcare professionals. This information allows us to better understand the risk of reinfection in previously infected individuals. Methods. We investigated the prevalence and duration of detectable antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in sequentially collected samples from 379 healthcare professionals. Results. SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence at inclusion was 5.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-8.0%) and 25% of seropositive participants reverted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the calculated probability of having detectable antibodies among former seropositive participants was 72.2% (95% CI: 54.2-96.2%). Conclusion. Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detectable in a subset of infected individuals for a minimum of 39 weeks.

3.
3rd International Conference on Quantitative Ethnography, ICQE 2021 ; 1522 CCIS:318-333, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1669747

ABSTRACT

This paper takes a quantitative ethnographic approach to understand how the lockdown in the spring of 2020 affected the teachers’ work situation at a large university in Denmark. Based on free-text responses from survey data, we create epistemic networks to explore how teachers articulate changes, longings, and potentials for their own future digital teaching practices based on their experiences of the first lockdown. The findings illustrate that interaction and human contact, which play a pivotal role in teachers’ didactical skillsets and efforts to create good learning environments, were missing during the lockdown. The study also highlights that teachers’ perceptions of the inability of digital, technological solutions appear to relate to on-campus teaching ideals. As such, this paper argues that future crisis-handling, as well as developments and refinements of digital teaching formats, at the university, should be attentive to support and foster better areas of contact and interaction between students and teachers. © 2022, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

4.
Danish Medical Journal ; 67(9), 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-984502

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing pandemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Limited data are available describing the clinical presentation and outcomes of hospitalised COVID-19 patients in Europe. METHODS:This was a single-centre retrospective chart review of all patients with COVID-19 admitted to the North Zealand Hospital in Denmark between 1 March and 4 May 2020. Main outcomes include major therapeutic interventions during hospitalisation, such as invasive mechanical ventilation, as well as death. RESULTS: A total of 115 patients were included, including four infants. The median age of adults was 68 years and 40% were female. At admission, 55 (50%) patients had a fever, 29 (26%) had a respiratory rate exceeding 24 breaths/minute, and 78 (70%) received supplemental oxygen. The prevalence of co-infection was 13%. Twenty patients (18%) (median age: 64 years;15% female) were treated in the intensive care unit. Twelve (10.4%) received invasive mechanical ventilation and three (2.6%) renal replacement therapy. Nine patients (8%) developed pulmonary embolism. Sixteen patients (14%) died. Among patients requiring mechanical ventilation (n=12), seven (6.1%) were discharged alive, four (3.4%) died and one (0.9%) was still hospitalised. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of hospitalised COVID-19 patients, mortality was lower than in other Danish and European case series.

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