Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Vaccines ; 11(1):58, 2023.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2167016

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses infections, culminating in the recent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic beginning in 2019, have highlighted the importance of effective vaccines to induce an antibody response with cross-neutralizing activity. COVID-19 vaccines have been rapidly developed to reduce the burden of SARS-CoV-2 infections and disease severity. Cross-protection from seasonal human coronaviruses (hCoVs) infections has been hypothesized but is still controversial. Here, we investigated the neutralizing activity against ancestral SARS-CoV-2 and the variants of concern (VOCs) in individuals vaccinated with two doses of either BNT162b2, mRNA-1273, or AZD1222, with or without a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Antibody neutralizing activity to SARS-CoV-2 and the VOCs was higher in BNT162b2-vaccinated subjects who were previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 and conferred broad-spectrum protection. The Omicron BA.1 variant was the most resistant among the VOCs. COVID-19 vaccination did not confer protection against hCoV-HKU1. Conversely, antibodies induced by mRNA-1273 vaccination displayed a boosting in their neutralizing activity against hCoV-NL63, whereas AZD1222 vaccination increased antibody neutralization against hCoV-229E, suggesting potential differences in antigenicity and immunogenicity of the different spike constructs used between various vaccination platforms. These data would suggest that there may be shared epitopes between the HCoVs and SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins.

2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 842468, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080127

ABSTRACT

The role of the mucosal pulmonary antibody response in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcome remains unclear. Here, we found that in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 48 patients with severe COVID-19-infected with the ancestral Wuhan virus, mucosal IgG and IgA specific for S1, receptor-binding domain (RBD), S2, and nucleocapsid protein (NP) emerged in BAL containing viruses early in infection and persist after virus elimination, with more IgA than IgG for all antigens tested. Furthermore, spike-IgA and spike-IgG immune complexes were detected in BAL, especially when the lung virus has been cleared. BAL IgG and IgA recognized the four main RBD variants. BAL neutralizing titers were higher early in COVID-19 when virus replicates in the lung than later in infection after viral clearance. Patients with fatal COVID-19, in contrast to survivors, developed higher levels of mucosal spike-specific IgA than IgG but lost neutralizing activities over time and had reduced IL-1ß in the lung. Altogether, mucosal spike and NP-specific IgG and S1-specific IgA persisting after lung severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) clearance and low pulmonary IL-1ß correlate with COVID-19 fatal outcome. Thus, mucosal SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies may have adverse functions in addition to protective neutralization. Highlights: Mucosal pulmonary antibody response in COVID-19 outcome remains unclear. We show that in severe COVID-19 patients, mucosal pulmonary non-neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 IgA persit after viral clearance in the lung. Furthermore, low lung IL-1ß correlate with fatal COVID-19. Altogether, mucosal IgA may exert harmful functions beside protective neutralization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Antigen-Antibody Complex , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , Lung , Nucleocapsid Proteins , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
3.
Commun Med (Lond) ; 1: 38, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860417

ABSTRACT

Background: The antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines in individuals with waning immunity generated by a previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as the patterns of IgA and IgM responses in previously infected and in naïve individuals are still poorly understood. Methods: We performed a serology study in a cohort of BTN162b2 mRNA vaccine recipients who were immunologically naïve (N, n = 50) or had been previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 (P.I., n = 51) during the first (n = 25) or second (n = 26) pandemic waves in Italy, respectively. We measured IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) and IgG against the nucleocapsid (N) proteins, as well as the neutralizing activity of sera collected before vaccination, after the first and second dose of vaccine. Results: Most P.I. individuals from the first pandemic wave who showed declining antibody titres responded to the first vaccine dose with IgG-S and pseudovirus neutralization titres that were significantly higher than those observed in N individuals after the second vaccine dose. In all recipients, a single dose of vaccine was sufficient to induce a potent IgA response that was not associated with serum neutralization titres. We observed an unconventional pattern of IgM responses that were elicited in only half of immunologically naïve subjects even after the second vaccine dose. Conclusions: The response to a single dose of vaccine in P.I. individuals is more potent than that observed in N individuals after two doses. Vaccine-induced IgA are not associated with serum neutralization.

4.
EBioMedicine ; 77: 103888, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, evaluation of the IgG antibodies specific for the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein following vaccination is used worldwide to estimate vaccine response. Limited data are available on vaccine-elicited IgM antibodies and their potential implication in immunity to SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We performed a longitudinal study to quantify anti-S SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgM (IgG-S and IgM-S) in health care worker (HCW) recipients of the BNT162b2 vaccine. Samples were collected before administration (T0), at the second dose (T1) and three weeks after T1 (T2). The cohort included 1584 immunologically naïve to SARS-CoV-2 (IN) and 289 with history of previous infection (PI). FINDINGS: IN showed three patterns of responses: (a) IgG positive/IgM negative (36.1%), (b) coordinated IgM-S/IgG-S responses appearing at T1 (37.4%) and (c) IgM appearing after IgG (26.3%). Coordinated IgM-S/IgG-S responses were associated with higher IgG titres. In IgM-S positive PI, 64.5% were IgM-S positive before vaccination, whereas 32% and 3.5% developed IgM-S after the first and second vaccine dose, respectively. IgM-S positive sera had higher pseudovirus neutralization titres compared to the IgM-S negative. INTERPRETATION: Coordinated expression of IgG-S and IgM-S after vaccination was associated with a significantly more efficient response in both antibody levels and virus-neutralizing activity. The unconventional IgG-S positive/IgM-S negative responses may suggest a recruitment of cross coronaviruses immunity by vaccination, warranting further investigation. FUNDING: Italian Ministry of Health under "Fondi Ricerca Corrente"- L1P5 and "Progetto Ricerca Finalizzata COVID-2020-12371675"; FUR 2020 Department of Excellence 2018-2022, MIUR, Italy; The Brain Research Foundation Verona.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Longitudinal Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination
5.
J Transl Med ; 20(1): 22, 2022 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637829

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 vaccines have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing SARS-CoV-2 mild and severe outcomes. In vaccinated subjects with SARS-CoV-2 history, RBD-specific IgG and pseudovirus neutralization titers were rapidly recalled by a single BTN162b2 vaccine dose to higher levels than those in naïve recipients after the second dose, irrespective of waning immunity. In this study, we inspected the long-term kinetic and neutralizing responses of S-specific IgG induced by two administrations of BTN162b2 vaccine in infection-naïve subjects and in subjects previously infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Twenty-six naïve and 9 previously SARS-CoV-2 infected subjects during the second wave of the pandemic in Italy were enrolled for this study. The two groups had comparable demographic and clinical characteristics. By means of ELISA and pseudotyped-neutralization assays, we investigated the kinetics of developed IgG-RBD and their neutralizing activity against both the ancestral D614G and the SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern emerged later, respectively. The Wilcoxon matched pair signed rank test and the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's correction for multiple comparison were applied when needed. RESULTS: Although after 15 weeks from vaccination IgG-RBD dropped in all participants, naïve subjects experienced a more dramatic decline than those with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. Neutralizing antibodies remained higher in subjects with SARS-CoV-2 history and conferred broad-spectrum protection. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that hybrid immunity to SARS-CoV-2 has a relevant impact on the development of IgG-RBD upon vaccination. However, the rapid decay of vaccination-elicited antibodies highlights that the administration of a third dose is expected to boost the response and acquire high levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibody Formation , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 772239, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528825

ABSTRACT

This contribution explores in a new statistical perspective the antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in 141 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients exhibiting a broad range of clinical manifestations. This cohort accurately reflects the characteristics of the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Italy. We determined the IgM, IgA, and IgG levels towards SARS-CoV-2 S1, S2, and NP antigens, evaluating their neutralizing activity and relationship with clinical signatures. Moreover, we longitudinally followed 72 patients up to 9 months postsymptoms onset to study the persistence of the levels of antibodies. Our results showed that the majority of COVID-19 patients developed an early virus-specific antibody response. The magnitude and the neutralizing properties of the response were heterogeneous regardless of the severity of the disease. Antibody levels dropped over time, even though spike reactive IgG and IgA were still detectable up to 9 months. Early baseline antibody levels were key drivers of the subsequent antibody production and the long-lasting protection against SARS-CoV-2. Importantly, we identified anti-S1 IgA as a good surrogate marker to predict the clinical course of COVID-19. Characterizing the antibody response after SARS-CoV-2 infection is relevant for the early clinical management of patients as soon as they are diagnosed and for implementing the current vaccination strategies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , Immunoglobulin A/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Female , HEK293 Cells , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
7.
Molecules ; 25(24)2020 Dec 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972696

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 first emerged in China during late 2019 and rapidly spread all over the world. Alterations in the inflammatory cytokines pathway represent a strong signature during SARS-COV-2 infection and correlate with poor prognosis and severity of the illness. The hyper-activation of the immune system results in an acute severe systemic inflammatory response named cytokine release syndrome (CRS). No effective prophylactic or post-exposure treatments are available, although some anti-inflammatory compounds are currently in clinical trials. Studies of plant extracts and natural compounds show that polyphenols can play a beneficial role in the prevention and the progress of chronic diseases related to inflammation. The aim of this manuscript is to review the published background on the possible effectiveness of polyphenols to fight SARS-COV-2 infection, contributing to the reduction of inflammation. Here, some of the anti-inflammatory therapies are discussed and although great progress has been made though this year, there is no proven cytokine blocking agents for COVID currently used in clinical practice. In this regard, bioactive phytochemicals such as polyphenols may become promising tools to be used as adjuvants in the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Such nutrients, with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, associated to classical anti-inflammatory drugs, could help in reducing the inflammation in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Pandemics , Phytochemicals/therapeutic use , Polyphenols/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/epidemiology , Polyphenols/chemistry
8.
Front Immunol ; 11: 580867, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887607

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is primarily diagnosed through viral RNA positivity in nasopharyngeal swabs, and it is associated with the early detection of specific immunoglobulins to SARS-CoV-2 proteins. We describe two moderate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with WHO score 4/5 at the time of hospitalization, pneumonia, and oxygen saturation <94% and with a strong discrepancy between viral RNA and antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. One patient was positive for viral RNA but completely negative for binding and neutralizing antibodies, whereas the second patient was negative for viral RNA but with high levels of both neutralizing and binding antibodies. This observation is relevant to better understand the pathogenesis of this novel infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Nasal Mucosa/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Serologic Tests
9.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1049, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-478228

ABSTRACT

The novel SARS-CoV-2 is a recently emerging virus causing a human pandemic. A great variety of symptoms associated with COVID-19 disease, ranging from mild to severe symptoms, eventually leading to death. Specific SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR is the standard method to screen symptomatic people; however, asymptomatic subjects and subjects with undetectable viral load escape from the screening, contributing to viral spread. Currently, the lock down imposed by many governments is an important measure to contain the spread, as there is no specific antiviral therapy or a vaccine and the main treatments are supportive. Therefore, there is urgent need to characterize the virus and the viral-mediated responses, in order to develop specific diagnostic and therapeutic tools to prevent viral transmission and efficiently cure COVID-19 patients. Here, we review the current studies on two viral mediated-responses, specifically the cytokine storm occurring in a subset of patients and the antibody response triggered by the infection. Further studies are needed to explore both the dynamics and the mechanisms of the humoral immune response in COVID-19 patients, in order to guide future vaccine design and antibody-based therapies for the management of the disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL