Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Aesthetic Plast Surg ; 2022 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physician relationships with industry and subsequent financial implications has not been previously assessed. The aim of this study is to compare pre- and post-COVID-19 payments between industry and medical providers for all plastic surgeons. METHODS: Payment information was collected for the 2019 and 2020 reporting periods from the Open Payments Program (OPP) database for plastic surgeons and plastic surgeon subspecialists. An analysis was performed of trends and comparison of payments for each year for all plastic surgeons and each subspecialty cohort. RESULTS: For all plastic surgeons, there was a decrease in industry payments between 2019 and 2020 (- 30.5%). All plastic surgery subspecialties had a decrease in payments with general plastic and reconstructive surgery affected the most (- 56%) and craniofacial surgery affected the least (- 9%). Payments for almost all categories for plastic surgeons decreased along with compensation as faculty or as speakers. Total charitable contributions and grant payments increased by 61 and 273%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Analysis of industry-physician payments available through the Sunshine Act shows that the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted industry payments to plastic surgery and its subspecialties. While this study demonstrates the economic impact of the current pandemic, only time will tell whether these trends will persist in the coming years. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE V: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

4.
FACE ; : 27325016221081830, 2022.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1731509

ABSTRACT

The current global pandemic raises myriad ethical issues for plastic surgeons. One not often discussed is that of an individual?s right to privacy when regarding health-related issues, the individual?s obligation to public health concerns, and the surgeon?s responsibility to their patients. Through a series of vignettes and discussion the nuances of those ethical responsibilities are explored.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291515

ABSTRACT

Some studies had shown that there is a relationship between the state of the economy of a country and COVID-19 incidence and mortality rates. However, these studies are just done on countries that are often on developed countries. This study aims to find the relationship between GDP and GDP per capita and COVID-19 incidence and mortality rates on all countries. In addition, they will also be analyzed based on their different income levels. The data collected are from databases from World Bank and WHO and will be analyzed through MS Excel and JASP. Spearman’s rho is used to analyze the overall data and stratified data. It has been found that the GDP per capita and incidence (r = .656, p < .001) and mortality rates (r = .521, p < .001) have a strong and moderate correlations respectively. GDP’s relationship with incidence (r = .295, p < .001) and mortality rates (r = .346, p < .001) resulted in both weak correlations. Stratified analysis resulted in no significant relationships, except for GDP per capita’s relationship with incidence (r = .362, p = .011) and mortality rates (r = .348, p = .014) in low-middle countries, which yielded both weak correlations. These results show that there is indeed a relationship between the incidence and mortality rates and the economic status of a country before a pandemic, however, more factors need to be accounted for in order to help countries improve their pandemic response in the future.

6.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(3): 462e-474e, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on surgical training programs, reflecting decreases in elective surgical cases and emergency restructuring of clinical teams. The effect of these measures on U.S. plastic surgery resident education and wellness has not been characterized. METHODS: An institutional review board-exempted anonymous survey was developed through expert panel discussion and pilot testing. All current U.S. plastic surgery trainees were invited to complete a cross-sectional 28-question survey in April of 2020. Respondents were queried regarding demographic information, educational experiences, and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 668 residents responded to the survey, corresponding to a 56.1 percent response rate. Sex, training program type, postgraduate year, and region were well represented within the sample. Nearly all trainees (97.1 percent) reported restructuring of their clinical teams. One-sixth of respondents were personally redeployed to assist with the care of COVID-19 patients. A considerable proportion of residents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their education (58.1 percent) and wellness (84.8 percent). Residents found virtual curriculum effective and meaningful, and viewed an average of 4.2 lectures weekly. Although most residents did not anticipate a change in career path, some reported negative consequences on job prospects or fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on U.S. plastic surgery education and wellness. Although reductions in case volume may be temporary, this may represent a loss of critical, supervised clinical experience. Some effects may be positive, such as the development of impactful virtual lectures that allow for cross-institutional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Status , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
7.
Am Surg ; : 31348211023428, 2021 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262467

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Pediatric colorectal problems often require complex multidisciplinary care (MDC), which has been affected by the SARS-CoV-2-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We describe our utilization and implementation of telehealth (TH) for pediatric colorectal surgery MDC visits and collate patient satisfaction using TH compared to in-person (IP) visits. METHODS: Implementation of a single-institution MDC TH platform to perform patient visits on February 1, 2020 was studied. Following 6 months of implementation, TH visits' characteristics were compared with IP visits in the 3 months before implementation by patient volume, length of clinic visits, and patient satisfaction survey results. RESULTS: Before implementation, 152 (100%) of clinic visits were IP. During the implementation, 87 (37.7%) were TH visits. Seventy-four (49%) were MDC visits, 17 (23%) of these using the TH platform. Each TH visit's median length was 25 minutes (IQR 15-30), while the median length of IP visits was 45 minutes (IQR 30-45). Pre-implementation satisfaction scores were 88.6% positive, while satisfaction scores after implementation were 96.8% positive. None of the patients who utilized the TH platform had an unplanned hospital admission within 24 hours of being seen. CONCLUSION: Our experience demonstrates that the TH platform can provide an efficient avenue for established patients and families to receive highly complex multidisciplinary follow-up care. High levels of patient satisfaction indicated that TH should become part of the routine care plan for patients who require long-term or consistent follow-up.

8.
Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open ; 9(3): e3535, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unpreceded changes to medical education. Medical students interested in urology and neurosurgery have reported concerns regarding COVID-19's effects on clinical experience and the residency application process; however, the impact amongst students interested in plastic surgery is unknown. We hypothesized that students applying into plastic surgery may experience much distress as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An electronic survey was developed by 3 plastic surgery residents and 2 academic plastic surgeons and later refined by 4 fourth-year medical students. Questions focused on medical education curricular changes, perceived impact on medical education, and demographics. From April-May 2020 the survey was distributed to medical students who were interested in plastic surgery. Participants were identified through plastic surgery residency program personnel and social media platforms. RESULTS IN TOTAL: 130 of the 140 respondents reported interest in plastic surgery careers. An estimated 67% were in their clinical years or completing research year(s) before residency applications. Of the respondents, 80% believed that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their medical education. Clinical-level students compared with preclinical-level students, and students applying to residency during the 2020-2021 match cycle compared with students not applying during the 2020-2021 match cycle were significantly more likely to perceive the COVID-19 pandemic as having a negative impact on their medical education (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). CONCLUSION: Medical students interested in plastic surgery perceive the COVID-19 pandemic as having a negative impact on their education, likely due to a reduction in clinical exposure.

9.
Clin Chem ; 66(11): 1472-1473, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-900407
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL