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1.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 310, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 first wave in France, the capacity of intensive care unit (ICU) beds almost doubled, mainly because of the opening of temporary ICUs with staff and equipment from anaesthesia. OBJECTIVES: We aim to investigate if the initial management in temporary ICU is associated with a change in ICU mortality and short-term prognosis. DESIGN: Retrospective single-centre cohort study. SETTING: Surgical ICU of the Bichat Claude Bernard University Hospital during the COVID-19 "first wave" (from 18 March to 10 April 2020). PATIENTS: All consecutive patients older than 18 years of age with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or typical radiological patterns were included during their first stay in the ICU for COVID-19. INTERVENTION: Patients were admitted to a temporary ICU if no room was available in the classical ICU and if they needed invasive mechanical ventilation but no renal replacement therapy or Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) in the short term. The temporary ICUs were managed by mixed teams (from the ICU and anaesthesiology departments) following a common protocol and staff meetings. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: ICU mortality RESULTS: Among the 59 patients admitted, 37 (62.7%) patients had initial management in the temporary ICU. They had the same characteristics on admission and the same medical management as patients admitted to the classical ICU. ICU mortality was similar in the 2 groups (32.4% in temporary ICUs versus 40.9% in classical ICUs; p=0.58). SAPS-II and ECMO use were associated with mortality in multivariate analysis but not admission to the temporary ICU. CONCLUSION: In an overload context of the ICU of a geographical area, our temporary ICU model allowed access to intensive care for all patients requiring it without endangering them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Biomedicines ; 10(4)2022 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834700

ABSTRACT

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have multiple endothelioprotective properties. During SARS-CoV-2 infection, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is markedly reduced, and studies have described severe impairment of the functionality of HDL particles. Here, we report a multi-omic investigation of the first administration of recombinant HDL (rHDL) particles in a severe COVID-19 patient in an intensive care unit. Plasma ApoA1 increased and HDL-C decreased after each recombinant HDL injection, suggesting that these particles were functional in terms of reverse cholesterol transport. The proportion of large HDL particles also increased after injection of recombinant HDL. Shotgun proteomics performed on HDLs isolated by ultracentrifugation indicated that ApoA1 was more abundant after injections whereas most of the pro-inflammatory proteins identified were less abundant. Assessment of Serum amyloid A-1, inflammatory markers, and cytokines showed a significant decrease for most of them during recombinant HDL infusion. Our results suggest that recombinant HDL infusion is feasible and a potential therapeutic strategy to be explored in COVID-19 patients.

3.
Biomedicines ; 10(4):754, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1762667

ABSTRACT

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have multiple endothelioprotective properties. During SARS-CoV-2 infection, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is markedly reduced, and studies have described severe impairment of the functionality of HDL particles. Here, we report a multi-omic investigation of the first administration of recombinant HDL (rHDL) particles in a severe COVID-19 patient in an intensive care unit. Plasma ApoA1 increased and HDL-C decreased after each recombinant HDL injection, suggesting that these particles were functional in terms of reverse cholesterol transport. The proportion of large HDL particles also increased after injection of recombinant HDL. Shotgun proteomics performed on HDLs isolated by ultracentrifugation indicated that ApoA1 was more abundant after injections whereas most of the pro-inflammatory proteins identified were less abundant. Assessment of Serum amyloid A-1, inflammatory markers, and cytokines showed a significant decrease for most of them during recombinant HDL infusion. Our results suggest that recombinant HDL infusion is feasible and a potential therapeutic strategy to be explored in COVID-19 patients.

4.
Vieillard-Baron, Antoine, Flicoteaux, Rémi, Salmona, Maud, Annane, Djillali, Ayed, Soufia, Azoulay, Elie, Bellaiche, Raphael, Beloucif, Sadek, Berti, Enora, Bertier, Astrid, Besset, Sébastien, Bret, Marlène, Cariou, Alain, Carpentier, Christophe, Chaouch, Oussama, Chariot, Appoline, Charron, Cyril, Charpentier, Julien, Cheurfa, Cherifa, Cholley, Bernard, Clerc, Sébastien, Combes, Alain, Chousterman, Benjamin, Cohen, Yves, Constantin, Jean-Michel, Damoisel, Charles, Darmon, Michael, Degos, Vincent, D’Ableiges, Bertrand De Maupeou, Demeret, Sophie, Montmollin, Etienne De, Demoule, Alexandre, Depret, Francois, Diehl, Jean-Luc, Djibré, Michel, Do, Chung-Hi, Dudoignon, Emmanuel, Duranteau, Jacques, Fartoukh, Muriel, Fieux, Fabienne, Gayat, Etienne, Gennequin, Mael, Guidet, Bertrand, Gutton, Christophe, Hamada, Sophie, Heming, Nicholas, Jouffroy, Romain, Keita-Meyer, Hawa, Langeron, Olivier, Lortat-Jacob, Brice, Marey, Jonathan, Mebazaa, Alexandre, Megarbane, Bruno, Mekontso-Dessap, Armand, Mira, Jean-Paul, Molle, Julie, Mongardon, Nicolas, Montravers, Philippe, Morelot-Panzini, Capucine, Nemlaghi, Safaa, Nguyen, Bao-long, Parrot, Antoine, Pasqualotto, Romain, Peron, Nicolas, Picard, Lucile, de Chambrun, Marc Pineton, Planquette, Benjamin, Plaud, Benoit, Pons, Stéphanie, Quesnel, Christophe, Raphalen, Jean-Herlé, Razazi, Keyvan, Ricard, Jean-Damien, Roche, Anne, Rohaut, Benjamin, Roux, Damien, Savale, Laurent, Sobotka, Jennifer, Teboul, Jean-Louis, Timsit, Jean-François, Voiriot, Guillaume, Weiss, Emmanuel, Wildenberg, Lucille, Zogheib, Elie, Riou, Bruno, Batteux, Frédéric.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327150

ABSTRACT

Importance Information about the severity of Omicron is scarce. Objective To report the respective risk of ICU admission in patients hospitalized with Delta and Omicron variants and to compare the characteristics and disease severity of critically ill patients infected with both variants according to vaccination status. Design Analysis from the APHP database, called Reality, prospectively recording the following information in consecutive patients admitted in the ICU for COVID-19: age, sex, immunosuppression, vaccination, pneumonia, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, time between symptom onset and ICU admission, and in-ICU mortality. Retrospective analysis on an administrative database, “Système d’Information pour le Suivi des Victimes” (SI-VIC), which lists hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Setting 39 hospitals in the Paris area from APHP group. Participants Patients hospitalized from December 1, 2021 to January 18, 2022 for COVID-19. Main outcomes and measures Risk of ICU admission was evaluated in 3761 patients and Omicron cases were compared to Delta cases in the ICU in 888 consecutive patients. Results On January 18, 45% of patients in the ICU and 63.8% of patients in conventional hospital units were infected with the Omicron variant (p < 0.001). The risk of ICU admission with Omicron was reduced by 64% than with Delta (9.3% versus 25.8% of cases, respectively, p < 0.001). In critically ill patients, 400 had the Delta variant, 229 the Omicron variant, 98 had an uninformative variant screening test and 161 did not have information on variant screening test. 747 patients (84.1%) were admitted for pneumonia. Compared to patients infected with Delta, Omicron patients were more vaccinated (p<0.001), even with 3 doses, more immunocompromised (p<0.001), less admitted for pneumonia (p<0.001), especially when vaccinated (62.1% in vaccinated versus 80.7% in unvaccinated, p<0.001), and less invasively ventilated (p=0.02). Similar results were found in the subgroup of pneumonia but Omicron cases were older. Unadjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ between Omicron and Delta cases, neither in the overall population (20.0% versus 27.9%, p = 0.08), nor in patients with pneumonia (31.6% versus 29.7%, respectively) where adjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ according to the variant (HR 1.43 95%CI [0.89;2.29], p=0.14). Conclusion and relevance Compared to the Delta variant, the Omicron variant is less likely to result in ICU admission and less likely to be associated with pneumonia. However, when patients with the Omicron variant are admitted for pneumonia, the severity seems similar to that of patients with the Delta variant, with more immunocompromised and vaccinated patients and no difference in adjusted in-ICU mortality. Further studies are needed to confirm our results.

5.
J Med Case Rep ; 16(1): 2, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605063

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In patients receiving single lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, worsening of fibrosis of the native lung is usually progressive over time, with no significant effects on gas exchange. CASE PRESENTATION: Here, we describe the cases of two Caucasian male recipients of single lung transplants for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, 65 and 62 years of age, who exhibited acute worsening of lung fibrosis after an episode of serious viral infection (cytomegalovirus primo-infection in one case and COVID-19 in the other). In both cases, along with opacification of the native lung over several days, the patients presented acute respiratory failure that required the use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy. Eventually, hypoxemic respiratory failure resolved, but with rapid progression of fibrosis of the native lung. CONCLUSION: We conclude that acute worsening of fibrosis on the native lung secondary to a severe viral infection should be added to the list of potential complications developing on the native lung after single lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis , Lung Transplantation , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/therapy , Lung , Male , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250728, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207636

ABSTRACT

Among 197 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in ICU, 88 (44.7%) experienced at least one bacterial infection, with pneumonia (39.1%) and bloodstream infections (15,7%) being the most frequent. Unusual findings include frequent suspicion of bacterial translocations originating from the digestive tract as well as bacterial persistence in the lungs despite adequate therapy.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , Pneumonia, Bacterial/complications , Aged , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/microbiology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Bacterial/epidemiology
7.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(10): 2227-2234, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139366

ABSTRACT

Because the diagnosis of co/superinfection in COVID-19 patients is challenging, empirical antibiotic therapy is frequently initiated until microbiological analysis results. We evaluated the performance and the impact of the BioFire® FilmArray® Pneumonia plus Panel on 112 respiratory samples from 67 COVID-19 ICU patients suspected of co/superinfections. Globally, the sensitivity and specificity of the test were 89.3% and 99.1%, respectively. Positive tests led to antibiotic initiation or adaptation in 15% of episodes and de-escalation in 4%. When negative, 28% of episodes remained antibiotic-free (14% no initiation, 14% withdrawal). Rapid multiplex PCRs can help to improve antibiotic stewardship by administering appropriate antibiotics earlier and avoiding unnecessary prescriptions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Aged , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(2): 295-303, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065449

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical course of and risk factors for arterial thrombotic events in adult inpatients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: All consecutive adult patients admitted for COVID-19 infection in a referral center in France and discharged from the hospital between April 1 and April 30, 2020, were included. All arterial thrombotic events that occurred through discharge were considered for analysis. Epidemiologic, demographic, clinical, laboratory, treatment, and outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records with use of a standardized data collection form. RESULTS: Overall, 531 COVID-19+ patients were analyzed. Among them, 30 (5.6%) experienced arterial thrombotic events. Arterial thrombotic events in the setting of COVID-19 infection happened at a median of 11 (5-20) days after the first symptoms of infection; occurred in high-risk patients according to traditional cardiovascular risk factors; had an atypical pattern, such as thrombosis of the aorta, upper limb, or renal arteries or cerebral microvasculopathy in 7 (23.3%) cases; and were associated with an in-hospital mortality rate of 40%. Arterial thrombotic events increased the risk of death by 3-fold in COVID-19+ patients (hazard ratio, 2.96; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.7; P=.002). A subdistribution survival hazard model showed that a concentration of D-dimer above 1250 ng/mL increased the risk of arterial thrombotic events in COVID-19+ patients by more than 7 (subdistribution hazard ratio, 7.68; 95% CI, 2.9 to 20.6; P<.001). CONCLUSION: A dramatically high rate of in-hospital death was observed in patients who suffered arterial thrombotic events in the setting of COVID-19 infection. A D-dimer level above 1250 ng/mL at entry may identify COVID-19+ patients at risk for arterial thrombotic events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , Aged , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/epidemiology
10.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239573, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793642

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus2 has caused a global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). High-density lipoproteins (HDLs), particles chiefly known for their reverse cholesterol transport function, also display pleiotropic properties, including anti-inflammatory or antioxidant functions. HDLs and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) can neutralize lipopolysaccharides and increase bacterial clearance. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) decrease during bacterial sepsis, and an association has been reported between low lipoprotein levels and poor patient outcomes. The goal of this study was to characterize the lipoprotein profiles of severe ICU patients hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia and to assess their changes during bacterial ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) superinfection. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in a university hospital ICU. All consecutive patients admitted for COVID-19 pneumonia were included. Lipoprotein levels were assessed at admission and daily thereafter. The assessed outcomes were survival at 28 days and the incidence of VAP. RESULTS: A total of 48 patients were included. Upon admission, lipoprotein concentrations were low, typically under the reference values ([HDL-C] = 0.7[0.5-0.9] mmol/L; [LDL-C] = 1.8[1.3-2.3] mmol/L). A statistically significant increase in HDL-C and LDL-C over time during the ICU stay was found. There was no relationship between HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations and mortality on day 28 (log-rank p = 0.554 and p = 0.083, respectively). A comparison of alive and dead patients on day 28 did not reveal any differences in HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations over time. Bacterial VAP was frequent (64%). An association was observed between HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations on the day of the first VAP diagnosis and mortality ([HDL-C] = 0.6[0.5-0.9] mmol/L in survivors vs. [HDL-C] = 0.5[0.3-0.6] mmol/L in nonsurvivors, p = 0.036; [LDL-C] = 2.2[1.9-3.0] mmol/L in survivors vs. [LDL-C] = 1.3[0.9-2.0] mmol/L in nonsurvivors, p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations upon ICU admission are low in severe COVID-19 pneumonia patients but are not associated with poor outcomes. However, low lipoprotein concentrations in the case of bacterial superinfection during ICU hospitalization are associated with mortality, which reinforces the potential role of these particles during bacterial sepsis.


Subject(s)
Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Bacterial/blood , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Superinfection/blood , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , France , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Bacterial/mortality , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Anesth. Reanim. ; 2020.
Article in English, French | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-738087

ABSTRACT

We report here the implementation and the use during 24 days of critical care beds beyond the walls during the COVID-19 outbreak in a teaching university hospital in Paris. These beds were settled in a 14-bed recovery room and two adjacent operating theatres leading to 20 additional critical care beds. The historical timeline, architectural elements, human resources, organisation and medical devices issues are presented. The benefits and limitations of this organisation are discussed.

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