Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
J Med Virol ; 2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718362

ABSTRACT

We investigated the frequency of brain fog in a large cohort of patients with documented coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) who have survived the illness. We also scrutinized the potential risk factors associated with the development of brain fog. Adult patients (18-55 years of age), who were referred to the healthcare facilities anywhere in Fars province from February 19, 2020 to November 20, 2020 were included. All patients had a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. In a phone call, at least 3 months after their discharge from the hospital, we obtained their current information. A questionnaire was specifically designed for data collection. In total, 2696 patients had the inclusion criteria; 1680 (62.3%) people reported long COVID syndrome (LCS). LCS-associated brain fog was reported by 194 (7.2%) patients. Female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 1.4), respiratory problems at the onset (OR: 1.9), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR: 1.7) were significantly associated with reporting chronic post-COVID "brain fog" by the patients. In this large population-based study, we report that chronic post-COVID "brain fog" has significant associations with sex (female), respiratory symptoms at the onset, and the severity of the illness (ICU admission).

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-321165

ABSTRACT

Background: In March 2020, the WHO declared the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic. Although the number of infected cases is increasing, information about its clinical characteristics in the Middle East, especially in Iran, a country which is considered to be one of the most important focal points of the disease in the world, is lacking. To date, there is no available literature on the clinical data on COVID-19 patients in Iran. Methods: : In this multicenter retrospective study, 113 hospitalized confirmed cases of COVID-19 admitted to university affiliated hospitals in Shiraz, Iran from February 20 to March 20 were entered in the study. Results: : The mean age was 53.75 years and 71 (62.8%) were males. The most common symptoms at onset were fatigue (75: 66.4%), cough (73: 64.6%), and fever (67: 59.3%). Laboratory data revealed significant correlation between lymphocyte count (P value= 0.003), partial thromboplastin time (P value= 0.000), international normalized ratio (P value= 0.000) with the severity of the disease. The most common abnormality in chest CT scans was ground-glass opacity (77: 93.9%), followed by consolidation (48: 58.5%). Our results revealed an overall 8% (9 out of 113 cases) mortality rate among patients, in which the majority was among patients admitted to the ICU (5: 55.6%). Conclusion: Evaluating the clinical data of COVID-19 patients and finding the source of infection and studying the behavior of the disease is crucial for understanding the pandemic.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306036

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Corona became a public health threat worldwide in late 2019, in which its main target is lower airway. The aim of this study was to calculate the mortality rate and years of life lost due to COVID-19 in Iran. Method: All definite deaths due to COVID-19 from February 20, 2020 to the February 12, 2021 have been used. Descriptive analyzes included mean and standard deviation of age at death, the number and sex ratio of deaths. Then the age and sex-specific mortality rate were calculated. YLL were calculated using the standard life expectancy based on the 2015 WHO life-table. Results: : During the study period, 3169 (58.78% men and 41.22% women) definite coronary deaths occurred. The mean age at death was higher in women than men. The fatality rate of the disease was 1.83%. The highest number of years of life lost, according to both methods of YLL calculation, was in the age group of 69-60 years and the lowest was in the age group of 10-19 years. Conclusion: T his study showed that due to the high mortality of this disease, decision makers should focus on reducing mortality in the start of the next waves of COVID-19.

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315841

ABSTRACT

Background: Given the limited number of beds in intensive care units, establishing a system that can predict the outcome in COVID19 positive patients based on imaging plays an important role in using resources efficiently. Therefor this study was conducted to design an optimal scoring system related to the severity of COVID19 cases for distinguishing severe from non-severe patients. Materials: and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 82 patients with a definite diagnosis of COVID-19 infection, who had at least one chest CT scan in hospital course were enrolled.To assess the severity of pulmonary parenchymal involvement, we semi-quantitatively evaluated the extent and nature of abnormalities. The area of lung involvement was scored in three levels based on a 0-4 grading scale. Also, we established a 4-point scoring system for defining the nature of lung abnormalities. The two scores were multiplied by each other. A final radiologic severity score was determined after adding together the scores of all levels. Result: Of all cases, fifty-three (64.6%) were male with an average age of age 53.75. Among the patients in our study, 7 (8.5%) had severe disease and the mortality rate was 7.2%. The mean (±standard deviation) of the radiologic severity score was 34.3(±18.4) in the severe group and 11.3(±11.4) in the non-sever group. (P-value <0.05). Also, we found a significant reverse relationship between our severity score and O 2 saturation (P-value <0.05). Conclusion: The radiologic severity score demonstrated a significant correlation with the patients' mortality and severity of illness in COVID-19 patients.

5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314125

ABSTRACT

Background: On late December 2019, a viral pneumonia known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), was originated from China and spread very rapidly in the world. Therefore, COVID-19 became a global concern and health problem. Methods: We presented four patients in this study. They were selected from patients who presented with pneumonia symptoms and were suspicious for COVID-19 and referred to the intended centers for COVID-19 diagnosis and management of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in the south of Iran. Two nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal throat swab samples were collected from each patient and tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) detection by real-time reverse-transcriptase–polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR), and also samples were sent for influenza viruses and all the respiratory panel. Results: In the present report, four patients were diagnosed in the starting days of COVID-19 disease in our center in south of Iran with co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus. Conclusions: This co-infection of COVID-19 and influenza highlights the importance of considering SARS-CoV-2 PCR assay regardless of other positive findings for other pathogens in the primary test during the epidemic.

6.
Iran J Med Sci ; 46(6): 428-436, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513428

ABSTRACT

Background: Recently, people have recognized the post-acute phase symptoms of the COVID-19. We investigated the long-term symptoms associated with COVID-19, (Long COVID Syndrome), and the risk factors associated with it. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study. All the consecutive adult patients referred to the healthcare facilities anywhere in Fars province from 19 February 2020 until 20 November 2020 were included. All the patients had a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. In a phone call to the patients, at least three months after their discharge from the hospital, we obtained their current information. The IBM SPSS Statistics (version 25.0) was used. Pearson Chi square, Fisher's exact test, t test, and binary logistic regression analysis model were employed. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: In total, 4,681 patients were studied, 2915 of whom (62.3%) reported symptoms. The most common symptoms of long COVID syndrome were fatigue, exercise intolerance, walking intolerance, muscle pain, and shortness of breath. Women were more likely to experience long-term COVID syndrome than men (Odds Ratio: 1,268; 95% Confidence Interval: 1,122-1,432; P=0.0001), which was significant. Presentation with respiratory problems at the onset of illness was also significantly associated with long COVID syndrome (Odds Ratio: 1.425; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.177-1.724; P=0.0001). A shorter length of hospital stay was inversely associated with long COVID syndrome (Odds Ratio: 0.953; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.941-0.965; P=0.0001). Conclusion: Long COVID syndrome is a frequent and disabling condition and has significant associations with sex (female), respiratory symptoms at the onset, and the severity of the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291562

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been hypothesized that the COVID-19 is less prevalent in regions with warm climates. Here we investigated the correlation between temperature and the cumulative COVID-19 incidence rate. Method Daily data of the temperature and the cumulative COVID-19 incidence rate were obtained from meteorological stations’ reports and CORONALAB database, respectively, for every 36 counties of Fars province, southern Iran. Results A decreasing pattern in the cumulative incidence rate of COVID-19 was occurred at 20-25°C and 25-35°C for counties with the cold climate and counties with the warm climate, respectively;while it was increased at both upper and lower temperatures. Conclusion It appears that higher rates of disease transmission at temperatures below 20°C and above 35°C might be linked to people’s indoor gatherings, coupled with insufficient ventilation.

8.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 29(11): 16667-16677, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469750

ABSTRACT

This global level ecological study aimed to investigate the correlation between environmental factors and the COVID-19 indices. This survey is an ecological study, so all studied variables are aggregate variables. To collect the variables in the study, a data set was provided, which includes the information of each country based on the cumulative deaths, case fatality rate, recovery rate, and the number of performed COVID-19 tests. Scatter plots of environmental factors for the studied countries were drawn based on cumulative incidence rate of cases, cumulative incidence rate of death, tests, recovery rate, and case fatality rate of COVID-19. Furthermore, Spearman correlation coefficient was also used to verify the correlation between environmental factors and indicators related to COVID-19. The results of this ecological study showed that among all countries surveyed, Montenegro (60,310.56 per million) and Luxembourg (54,807.89 per million) had the highest cumulative incidence rates of COVID-19 cases, when Tanzania (8.42 per million) and Vietnam (13.78 per million) had the lowest cumulative incidence rates of COVID-19. In addition, in this study, it was shown that the cumulative incidence rate of cases, the cumulative incidence rate of deaths, and performed COVID-19 tests had significant direct correlations with the access to drinking water and the access to sanitation services (p < 0.001). The findings of the present study showed an inverse correlation between the mortality rate due to unhealthy water consumption, poor health status, and a positive correlation between access to drinking water and health services with the cumulative incidence and mortality rates of COVID-19. The differences between our findings and many other studies could be due to the ecological nature of the study. Nevertheless, our findings will help health policymakers to develop timely strategies to reduce the mortality and incidence rate of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Environment , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Drinking Water , Health Services Accessibility , Health Status , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sanitation
9.
World J Pediatr ; 17(5): 495-499, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392013

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To identify the prevalence and also the full spectrum of symptoms/complaints of children and adolescents who are suffering from long COVID. Furthermore, we investigated the risk factors of long COVID in children and adolescents. METHODS: All consecutive children and adolescents who were referred to the hospitals anywhere in Fars province, Iran, from 19 February 2020 until 20 November 2020 were included. All patients had a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. In a phone call to patients/parents, at least 3 months after their discharge from the hospital, we obtained their current status and information if their parents agreed to participate. RESULTS: In total, 58 children and adolescents fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty-six (44·8%) children/adolescents reported symptoms/complaints of long COVID. These symptoms included fatigue in 12 (21%), shortness of breath in 7 (12%), exercise intolerance in 7 (12%), weakness in 6 (10%), and walking intolerance in 5 (9%) individuals. Older age, muscle pain on admission, and intensive care unit admission were significantly associated with long COVID. CONCLUSIONS: Long COVID is a frequent condition in children and adolescents. The scientific community should investigate and explore the pathophysiology of long COVID to ensure that these patients receive appropriate treatments for their condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors
10.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-4, 2021 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169326

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A year after the emergence of a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), as a new crisis in respiratory infections, there remain many uncertainties and unknowns about SARS-CoV-2 and the disease it causes, called coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Although COVID-19 is known as a respiratory disease, some atypical manifestations have been seen, different from those seen in other types of viral respiratory infections. This paper aims to describe designing, launching, and implementing a data collection system for all respiratory diseases, with a focus on SARS-CoV-2 from the onset of this pandemic. METHOD: The current registry is designed in compliance with the standard Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines, along with the declaration of Helsinki principles. RESULTS: A respiratory disease registry, with an emphasis on COVID-19 and other co-infections, was developed. Data consisted of demographic, clinical, and supporting information about SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viral diseases. CONCLUSION: It is hoped that the current data registry will facilitate patient evaluation and improve the outcomes of cases of respiratory infection defined by a particular condition, disease, or exposure. Moreover, the registry can harmonize data about the treatment, outcomes, and well-being of patients who receive care over time, and identify best practices.

11.
Neurol Sci ; 41(11): 3057-3061, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777864

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study was to collect the data on the occurrence of seizures in patients with COVID-19 and to clarify the circumstances of the occurrence of seizures in these patients. METHODS: All consecutive patients who referred to healthcare facilities anywhere in Fars province (located in South Iran with a population of 4.851 million people) from February 19 until June 2, 2020, and had confirmed COVID-19 by positive result on polymerase chain reaction testing and seizure were included. RESULTS: During the study period, 6,147 people had confirmed COVID-19 in Fars province, Iran; 110 people died from the illness (case fatality rate 1.79%). During this time period, five people had seizures (seizure rate 0.08%). In four patients, seizure was one of the presenting manifestations, and in one person, it happened during the course of hospital admission. Two patients had status epilepticus. All patients experienced hypoxemia and four of them needed respirator. Two patients had related metabolic derangements and one had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytic pleocytosis. Brain imaging was abnormal in three patients. Four patients died. CONCLUSION: New-onset seizures in critically ill patients with COVID-19 should be considered as acute symptomatic seizures and the treating physician should try to determine the etiology of the seizure and manage the cause immediately and appropriately. Detailed clinical, neurological, imaging, and electrophysiological investigations and attempts to isolate SARS-CoV-2 from CSF may clarify the role played by this virus in causing seizures in these patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Seizures/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/epidemiology
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 427, 2020 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the WHO declared the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic. Although the number of infected cases is increasing, information about its clinical characteristics in the Middle East, especially in Iran, a country which is considered to be one of the most important focal points of the disease in the world, is lacking. To date, there is no available literature on the clinical data on COVID-19 patients in Iran. METHODS: In this multicenter retrospective study, 113 hospitalized confirmed cases of COVID-19 admitted to university affiliated hospitals in Shiraz, Iran from February 20 to March 20 were entered in the study. RESULTS: The mean age was 53.75 years and 71 (62.8%) were males. The most common symptoms at onset were fatigue (75: 66.4%), cough (73: 64.6%), and fever (67: 59.3%). Laboratory data revealed significant correlation between lymphocyte count (P value = 0.003), partial thromboplastin time (P value = 0.000), international normalized ratio (P value = 0.000) with the severity of the disease. The most common abnormality in chest CT scans was ground-glass opacity (77: 93.9%), followed by consolidation (48: 58.5%). Our results revealed an overall 8% (9 out of 113 cases) mortality rate among patients, in which the majority was among patients admitted to the ICU (5: 55.6%). CONCLUSION: Evaluating the clinical data of COVID-19 patients and finding the source of infection and studying the behavior of the disease is crucial for understanding the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
15.
Arch Iran Med ; 23(4): 239-243, 2020 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-50178

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In late December 2019, a viral pneumonia known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) originated from China and spread very rapidly in the world. Since then, COVID-19 has become a global concern and health problem. METHODS: We present four patients in this study, selected from among patients who presented with pneumonia symptoms and were suspicious for COVID-19. They were referred to the intended centers for COVID-19 diagnosis and management of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in southern Iran. Two nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal throat swab samples were collected from each patient and tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) using real-time reverse-transcriptase- polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR). The samples were also tested for influenza viruses and the complete respiratory panel. RESULTS: In the present report, four patients were diagnosed in the starting days of COVID-19 disease in our center in southern Iran with co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A virus. CONCLUSION: This co-infection of COVID-19 and influenza A highlights the importance of considering SARS-CoV-2 PCR assay regardless of other positive findings for other pathogens in the primary test during the epidemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Influenza, Human , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Radiography, Thoracic , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL