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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315379

ABSTRACT

Background: While the immunogenicity of inactivated vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) has been characterized in several well-conducted clinical trials, real-world evidence concerning immune responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) raised by such vaccines is currently missing. Here, we comprehensively characterized various parameters of SARS-CoV-2-specific cellular and humoral immune responses induced by inactivated COVID-19 vaccines under real-world conditions. Methods: Venous blood was collected from 126 adults, before and/or after inactivated COVID-19 vaccine inoculation. SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) and S-receptor binding domain IgG in the serum were detected. The isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated by three pools of lyophilized peptides covering the spike, nucleocapsid, and membrane protein of SARS-CoV-2 for evaluating antigen-specific T cell responses against the virus. Findings: The seroconversion rate for S-RBD IgG and NAb after two doses of vaccination was 87.06% (74/85) and 78.82% (67/85), respectively. Female participants developed higher concentrations of S-RBD IgG and NAb compared to male vaccinees. Interestingly, a longer dosing interval between the first and second vaccination resulted in a better long-term SARS-CoV-2 S-RBD IgG response. The frequencies of CD4+ T cells that produce effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α) in response to stimulation with peptide pools corresponding to the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S), nucleocapsid (N) or membrane (M) protein increased significantly after a single vaccination dose, and continued to increase after the second administration. S, N, or M-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses became detectable in 95.83% (69/72) and 54.16% (39/72) of double-vaccinated individuals, respectively. The longitudinal analysis demonstrated that CD4+ T cell responses recognizing S, N, and M waned quickly after a single vaccine dose, but were boosted and became more sustained following a second dose. Interpretation: Both humoral and cellular SARS-CoV-2-specific immunity are elicited in the majority of individuals after two doses of inactivated COVID-19 vaccines. Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR2100048837).Funding Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Science and Technology Major Project, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Medical Faculty of the University of Duisburg-Essen and Stiftung Universiätsmedizin, University Hospital Essen, Germany, and the Tongji-Rongcheng Center for Biomedicine, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.Declaration of Interest: None to declare. Ethical Approval: The study protocol was approved by the local medical ethics committee of Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (2021-0570)

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311943

ABSTRACT

The magnitude of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the dynamic changes of immune parameters in patients with the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and their correlation with the disease severity remain unclear. The clinical and laboratory results from 154 confirmed COVID-19 patients were collected. The SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels in patients were estimated using the Ct values of specific RT-PCR tests. The lymphocyte subsets and cytokines profiles in the peripheral blood were analyzed by flow cytometry and specific immunoassays. 154 confirmed COVID-19 patients were clinically examined up to 4 weeks after admission. The initial SARS-CoV-2 RNA Ct values at admission varied but were comparable in the patient groups classified according to the age, gender, underlying diseases, and disease severity. Three days after admission significant higher Ct values were found in severe cases. Significantly reduced counts of T cells and T cell subsets were found in patients with old age and underlying diseases at admission and were characteristic for the development of severe COVID-19. Severe COVID-19 developed preferentially in patients with underlying compromised immunity and was not associated with initial virus levels. Higher SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels in severe cases were apparently a result of impaired immune control associated with dysregulation of inflammation.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323932

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) will progress rapidly to acute respiratory failure or death. We aimed to develop a quantitative tool for early predicting mortality risk of patients with COVID-19. Methods: : 301 patients with confirmed COVID-19 admitted to Main District and Tumor Center of the Union Hospital of Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Wuhan, China) between January 1, 2020 to February 15, 2020 were enrolled in this retrospective two-centers study. Data on patient demographic characteristics, laboratory findings and clinical outcomes was analyzed. A nomogram was constructed to predict the death probability of COVID-19 patients. Results: : Age, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, D-dimer and C-reactive protein obtained on admission were identified by LASSO regression as predictors of mortality for COVID-19 patients. The nomogram demonstrated good calibration and discrimination with the area under the curve (AUC) of 0.921 and 0.975 for the derivation and validation cohort, respectively. An integrated score (named ANDC) with its corresponding death probability was derived. Using ANDC cut-off values of 59 and 101, COVID-19 patients were classified into three subgroups. The death probability of low risk group (ANDC < 59) was less than 5%, moderate risk group (59 ≤ ANDC ≤ 101) was 5% to 50%, and high risk group (ANDC > 101) was more than 50%, respectively. Conclusion: The prognostic nomogram exhibited good discrimination power in early identification of COVID-19 patients with high mortality risk, and ANDC score may help physicians to optimize patient stratification management.

4.
Frontiers in immunology ; 12, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602189

ABSTRACT

While the immunogenicity of inactivated vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) has been characterized in several well-conducted clinical trials, real-world evidence concerning immune responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) raised by such vaccines is currently missing. Here, we comprehensively characterized various parameters of SARS-CoV-2-specific cellular and humoral immune responses induced by inactivated COVID-19 vaccines in 126 individuals under real-world conditions. After two doses of vaccination, S-receptor binding domain IgG (S-RBD IgG) and neutralizing antibody (NAb) were detected in 87.06% (74/85) and 78.82% (67/85) of individuals, respectively. Female participants developed higher concentrations of S-RBD IgG and NAb compared to male vaccinees. Interestingly, a longer dosing interval between the first and second vaccination resulted in a better long-term SARS-CoV-2 S-RBD IgG response. The frequencies of CD4+ T cells that produce effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α) in response to stimulation with peptide pools corresponding to the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S), nucleocapsid (N) or membrane (M) protein were significantly higher in individuals received two doses of vaccine than those received one dose of vaccine and unvaccinated individuals. S, N, or M-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were detectable in 95.83% (69/72) and 54.16% (39/72) of double-vaccinated individuals, respectively. The longitudinal analysis demonstrated that CD4+ T cell responses recognizing S, N, and M waned quickly after a single vaccine dose, but were boosted and became more sustained following a second dose. Overall, we provide a comprehensive characterization of immune responses induced by inactivated COVID-19 vaccines in real-world settings, suggesting that both humoral and cellular SARS-CoV-2-specific immunity are elicited in the majority of individuals after two doses of inactivated COVID-19 vaccines.

5.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 483-497, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606402

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has set off a global pandemic. There is an urgent unmet need for safe, affordable, and effective therapeutics against COVID-19. In this regard, drug repurposing is considered as a promising approach. We assessed the compounds that affect the endosomal acidic environment by applying human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2)- expressing cells infected with a SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein-pseudotyped HIV reporter virus and identified that obatoclax resulted in the strongest inhibition of S protein-mediated virus entry. The potent antiviral activity of obatoclax at nanomolar concentrations was confirmed in different human lung and intestinal cells infected with the SARS-CoV-2 pseudotype system as well as clinical virus isolates. Furthermore, we uncovered that obatoclax executes a double-strike against SARS-CoV-2. It prevented SARS-CoV-2 entry by blocking endocytosis of virions through diminished endosomal acidification and the corresponding inhibition of the enzymatic activity of the endosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L. Additionally, obatoclax impaired the SARS-CoV-2 S-mediated membrane fusion by targeting the MCL-1 protein and reducing furin protease activity. In accordance with these overarching mechanisms, obatoclax blocked the virus entry mediated by different S proteins derived from several SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern such as, Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), and Delta (B.1.617.2). Taken together, our results identified obatoclax as a novel effective antiviral compound that keeps SARS-CoV-2 at bay by blocking both endocytosis and membrane fusion. Our data suggested that obatoclax should be further explored as a clinical drug for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Cathepsins/metabolism , Furin/metabolism , Indoles/pharmacology , Pyrroles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization/drug effects , COVID-19 , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
6.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 19(2): 150-157, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467097

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is an ongoing pandemic that poses a great threat to human health worldwide. As the humoral immune response plays essential roles in disease occurrence and development, understanding the dynamics and characteristics of virus-specific humoral immunity in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients is of great importance for controlling this disease. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the humoral immune response after SARS-CoV-2 infection and further emphasize the potential applications and therapeutic prospects of SARS-CoV-2-specific humoral immunity and the critical role of this immunity in vaccine development. Notably, serological antibody testing based on the humoral immune response can guide public health measures and control strategies; however, it is not recommended for population surveys in areas with very low prevalence. Existing evidence suggests that asymptomatic individuals have a weaker immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, whereas SARS-CoV-2-infected children have a more effective humoral immune response than adults. The correlations between antibody (especially neutralizing antibody) titers and protection against SARS-CoV-2 reinfection should be further examined. In addition, the emergence of cross-reactions among different coronavirus antigens in the development of screening technology and the risk of antibody-dependent enhancement related to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination should be given further attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Humoral , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross Reactions , Humans , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 722027, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399138

ABSTRACT

Approximately half of the SARS-CoV-2 infections occur without apparent symptoms, raising questions regarding long-term humoral immunity in asymptomatic individuals. Plasma levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and M (IgM) against the viral spike or nucleoprotein were determined for 25,091 individuals enrolled in a surveillance program in Wuhan, China. We compared 405 asymptomatic individuals who mounted a detectable antibody response with 459 symptomatic COVID-19 patients. The well-defined duration of the SARS-CoV-2 endemic in Wuhan allowed a side-by-side comparison of antibody responses following symptomatic and asymptomatic infections without subsequent antigen re-exposure. IgM responses rapidly declined in both groups. However, both the prevalence and durability of IgG responses and neutralizing capacities correlated positively with symptoms. Regardless of sex, age, and body weight, asymptomatic individuals lost their SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies more often and rapidly than symptomatic patients did. These findings have important implications for immunity and favour immunization programs including individuals after asymptomatic infections.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Epidemiological Monitoring , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Young Adult
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 708523, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295646

ABSTRACT

Major advances have been made in understanding the dynamics of humoral immunity briefly after the acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, knowledge concerning long-term kinetics of antibody responses in convalescent patients is limited. During a one-year period post symptom onset, we longitudinally collected 162 samples from 76 patients and quantified IgM and IgG antibodies recognizing the nucleocapsid (N) protein or the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein (S). After one year, approximately 90% of recovered patients still had detectable SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies recognizing N and RBD-S. Intriguingly, neutralizing activity was only detectable in ~43% of patients. When neutralization tests against the E484K-mutated variant of concern (VOC) B.1.351 (initially identified in South Africa) were performed among patients who neutralize the original virus, the capacity to neutralize was even further diminished to 22.6% of donors. Despite declining N- and S-specific IgG titers, a considerable fraction of recovered patients had detectable neutralizing activity one year after infection. However, neutralizing capacities, in particular against an E484K-mutated VOC were only detectable in a minority of patients one year after symptomatic COVID-19. Our findings shed light on the kinetics of long-term immune responses after natural SARS-CoV-2 infection and argue for vaccinations of individuals who experienced a natural infection to protect against emerging VOC.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Convalescence , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors
10.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 582620, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256382

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of the influenza A (H1N1) and SARS-CoV-2 virus on the development of autoimmune hepatitis has not been described previously. Methods: In this case series, we evaluated the dynamic changes in liver function of three patients with autoimmune hepatitis who presented with viral infection (two with the H1N1 and one with the SARS-CoV-2 virus) during the recent COVID-19 outbreak. Result: Patient 1 was a 68-year-old woman with a history of hepatitis of unknown origin before being infected with the H1N1 virus. Autoimmune hepatitis with an exacerbation of liver injury was diagnosed during the infection. Patient 2 was a 48-year-old woman with pre-existing autoimmune hepatitis. Despite being on immunosuppressant therapy (using glucocorticoids), liver injury recurred with elevated total bilirubin and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels post H1N1 infection. Patient 3 was a 61-year-old woman with probable autoimmune hepatitis. Liver injury recurred with a flare in alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase levels post SARS-CoV-2 infection, in spite of the patient being on liver protection therapy (using ursodeoxycholic acid). Conclusion: The case series raises the possibility that COVID-19 or influenza induced pneumonia triggers the progression of autoimmune hepatitis.

12.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 758-767, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217478

ABSTRACT

Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is an essential method for specific diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Unfortunately, false negative test results are often reported. In this study, we attempted to determine the principal causes leading to false negative results of RT-PCR detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNAs in respiratory tract specimens. Multiple sputum and throat swab specimens from 161 confirmed COVID-19 patients were tested with a commercial fluorescent RT-PCR kit targeting the ORF1ab and N regions of SARS-CoV-2 genome. The RNA level of a cellular housekeeping gene ribonuclease P/MRP subunit p30 (RPP30) in these specimens was also assessed by RT-PCR. Data for a total of 1052 samples were retrospectively re-analyzed and a strong association between positive results in SARS-CoV-2 RNA tests and high level of RPP30 RNA in respiratory tract specimens was revealed. By using the ROC-AUC analysis, we identified Ct cutoff values for RPP30 RT-PCR which predicted false negative results for SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR with high sensitivity (95.03%-95.26%) and specificity (83.72%-98.55%) for respective combination of specimen type and amplification reaction. Using these Ct cutoff values, false negative results could be reliably identified. Therefore, the presence of cellular materials, likely infected host cells, are essential for correct SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection by RT-PCR in patient specimens. RPP30 could serve as an indicator for cellular content, or a surrogate indicator for specimen quality. In addition, our results demonstrated that false negativity accounted for a vast majority of contradicting results in SARS-CoV-2 RNA test by RT-PCR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Autoantigens/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Negative Results , Polyproteins/genetics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Reference Standards , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Ribonuclease P/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity , Viral Proteins/genetics
13.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206004

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) affected over 120 million people and killed over 2.7 million individuals by March 2021. While acute and intermediate interactions between SARS-CoV-2 and the immune system have been studied extensively, long-term impacts on the cellular immune system remain to be analyzed. Here, we comprehensively characterized immunological changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 49 COVID-19-convalescent individuals (CI) in comparison to 27 matched SARS-CoV-2-unexposed individuals (UI). Despite recovery from the disease for more than 2 months, CI showed significant decreases in frequencies of invariant NKT and NKT-like cells compared to UI. Concomitant with the decrease in NKT-like cells, an increase in the percentage of annexin V and 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD) double-positive NKT-like cells was detected, suggesting that the reduction in NKT-like cells results from cell death months after recovery. Significant increases in regulatory T cell frequencies and TIM-3 expression on CD4 and CD8 T cells were also observed in CI, while the cytotoxic potential of T cells and NKT-like cells, defined by granzyme B (GzmB) expression, was significantly diminished. However, both CD4 and CD8 T cells of CI showed increased Ki67 expression and were fully able to proliferate and produce effector cytokines upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. Collectively, we provide a comprehensive characterization of immune signatures in patients recovering from SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting that the cellular immune system of COVID-19 patients is still under a sustained influence even months after the recovery from disease.IMPORTANCE Wuhan was the very first city hit by SARS-CoV-2. Accordingly, the patients who experienced the longest phase of convalescence following COVID-19 reside here. This enabled us to investigate the "immunological scar" left by SARS-CoV-2 on cellular immunity after recovery from the disease. In this study, we characterized the long-term impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the immune system and provide a comprehensive picture of cellular immunity of a convalescent COVID-19 patient cohort with the longest recovery time. We revealed that the cellular immune system of COVID-19 patients is still under a sustained influence even months after the recovery from disease; in particular, a profound NKT cell impairment was found in the convalescent phase of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , Immunity, Cellular , Natural Killer T-Cells/immunology , Adult , Apoptosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Cytotoxicity, Immunologic , Female , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology
14.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1813, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147224

ABSTRACT

Long-term antibody responses and neutralizing activities in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection are not yet clear. Here we quantify immunoglobulin M (IgM) and G (IgG) antibodies recognizing the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike (S) or the nucleocapsid (N) protein, and neutralizing antibodies during a period of 6 months from COVID-19 disease onset in 349 symptomatic COVID-19 patients who were among the first be infected world-wide. The positivity rate and magnitude of IgM-S and IgG-N responses increase rapidly. High levels of IgM-S/N and IgG-S/N at 2-3 weeks after disease onset are associated with virus control and IgG-S titers correlate closely with the capacity to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. Although specific IgM-S/N become undetectable 12 weeks after disease onset in most patients, IgG-S/N titers have an intermediate contraction phase, but stabilize at relatively high levels over the 6 month observation period. At late time points, the positivity rates for binding and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies are still >70%. These data indicate sustained humoral immunity in recovered patients who had symptomatic COVID-19, suggesting prolonged immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
15.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 673-684, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044644

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence and rapid global spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pose an unprecedented medical and socioeconomic crisis, and the disease caused by it, Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11, 2020. Chinese scientists and physicians rapidly identified the causative pathogen, which turned out to be a novel betacoronavirus with high sequence similarities to bat and pangolin coronaviruses. The scientific community has ignited tremendous efforts to unravel the biological underpinning of SARS-CoV-2, which constitutes the foundation for therapy and vaccine development strategies. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge on the genome, structure, receptor, and origin of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral , Humans , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , World Health Organization
16.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 196-205, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007446

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Following outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2002 and 2012, respectively, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the third highly pathogenic emerging human coronavirus (hCoV). SARS-CoV-2 is currently causing the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. CoV infections in target cells may stimulate the formation of numerous double-membrane autophagosomes and induce autophagy. Several studies provided evidence that hCoV infections are closely related to various cellular aspects associated with autophagy. Autophagy may even promote hCoV infection and replication. However, so far it is unclear how hCoV infections induce autophagy and whether the autophagic machinery is necessary for viral propagation. Here, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the mutual interplay between the autophagic machinery and the three emerging hCoVs, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2 and the model system mouse hepatitis virus. We also discuss the applicability of approved and well-tolerated drugs targeting autophagy as a potential treatment against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Autophagosomes/virology , Autophagy , COVID-19/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic , Genome, Viral , Humans , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
17.
Genes Dis ; 8(4): 484-492, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933100

ABSTRACT

To date, it remains unclear if severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) co-infection exacerbates liver injury in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this study, we present a retrospective study of 133 hospitalized confirmed mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases, including 116 patients with COVID-19 with negative serum hepatitis B antigen and 17 HBV inactive carriers with COVID-19. We found that there were no significant differences for the discharge rate or duration of hospitalization between the two groups. However, inactive HBV carriers with SARS-CoV-2 co-infection are at a higher risk of abnormal liver function tests. The enhanced liver injury induced by SARS-CoV-2 and HBV co-infection was identified as the hepatocyte type rather than the cholangiocyte type. Moreover, the inflammatory response, including abnormal lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer and interleukin-6 production, may contribute to this injury following SARS-CoV-2 co-infection. Collectively, SARS-CoV-2 and HBV co-infection exacerbates liver function of the patients with COVID-19.

18.
Front Immunol ; 11: 2063, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868947

ABSTRACT

Background: Cases of excessive neutrophil counts in the blood in severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients have drawn significant attention. Neutrophil infiltration was also noted on the pathological findings from autopsies. It is urgent to clarify the pathogenesis of neutrophils leading to severe pneumonia in COVID-19. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 55 COVID-19 patients classified as mild (n = 22), moderate (n = 25), and severe (n = 8) according to the Guidelines released by the National Health Commission of China. Trends relating leukocyte counts and lungs examined by chest CT scan were quantified by Bayesian inference. Transcriptional signatures of host immune cells of four COVID19 patients were analyzed by RNA sequencing of lung specimens and BALF. Results: Neutrophilia occurred in 6 of 8 severe patients at 7-19 days after symptom onset, coinciding with lesion progression. Increasing neutrophil counts paralleled lesion CT values (slope: 0.8 and 0.3-1.2), reflecting neutrophilia-induced lung injury in severe patients. Transcriptome analysis revealed that neutrophil activation was correlated with 17 neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-associated genes in COVID-19 patients, which was related to innate immunity and interacted with T/NK/B cells, as supported by a protein-protein interaction network analysis. Conclusion: Excessive neutrophils and associated NETs could explain the pathogenesis of lung injury in COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophils/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Aged , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lung Injury/immunology , Lung Injury/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophil Infiltration/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Interaction Maps/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome
20.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1158

ABSTRACT

Background: A critical issue is to identify COVID-19 patients early who develosevere pneumonia. Understanding the relationshiof the laboratory parameters an

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