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International Conference on Transportation and Development 2022, ICTD 2022 ; 6:134-142, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2050653

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a reduction in business and routine activity and resulted in less motor fuel consumption. Thus, the gas tax revenue is reduced, which is the major funding resource supporting the rehabilitation and maintenance of transportation infrastructure systems. The focus of this study is to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on transportation infrastructure funds in the United States through analyzing the motor fuel consumption data. Machine learning models were developed by integrating COVID-19 scenarios, fuel consumptions, and demographic data. The best model achieves an R2-score of more than 95% and captures the fluctuations of fuel consumption during the pandemic. Using the developed model, we project future motor gas consumption for each state. For some states, the gas tax revenues are going to be 10%-15% lower than the pre-pandemic level for at least one or two years. © 2022 International Conference on Transportation and Development

3.
Innovation in Aging ; 5:481-481, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2011900
4.
Innovation in Aging ; 5:406-407, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2011768
5.
10th International Conference on Distributed, Ambient and Pervasive Interactions, DAPI 2022 Held as Part of the 24th HCI International Conference, HCII 2022 ; 13325 LNCS:278-290, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1930304

ABSTRACT

This paper explores the possibility of combining sensory data of multiple individuals into a collective visualization. Using a smart cushion for office chairs that collects several stress-related parameters, namely: heart rate, respiratory rate, and heart-rate variability, individuals’ data can be aggregated into a collective stress visualization. Three different visualizations are designed which ly, grouped and aggregated, and metaphorically visualize the collective stress. Additionally, two more visualizations are explored for the ‘new way of working’ during the COVID-19 epidemic, where people work remotely and from the office. Through expert and user interviews, these visualizations are evaluated. Additionally, there is researched on whether measured heart-rate variability can predict perceived stress levels. The results found an inversed correlation than hypothesized. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

7.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-328525

ABSTRACT

The underlying immunologic deficiencies enabling SARS-CoV-2 reinfections are currently unknown. Here we describe a renal-transplant recipient who developed recurrent, symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection 7 months after primary infection. To elucidate the immunological mechanisms responsible for reinfection, we performed longitudinal profiling of cellular and humoral responses during both primary and recurrent SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that the patient responded to the primary infection with transient, poor-quality adaptive immune responses that was further compromised by intervening treatment for acute rejection of the renal allograft prior to reinfection. Importantly, we identified the development of neutralizing antibodies and humoral memory responses prior to SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. However, these neutralizing antibodies failed to confer protection against reinfection, suggesting that additional factors are required for efficient prevention of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. Further, we found no evidence supporting viral evasion of primary adaptive immune responses, suggesting that susceptibility to reinfection may be determined by host factors rather than pathogen adaptation.

8.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326635

ABSTRACT

Prior to the emergence of antigenically distinct SARS-CoV-2 variants, reinfections were reported infrequently - presumably due to the generation of durable and protective immune responses. However, case reports also suggested that rare, repeated infections may occur as soon as 48 days following initial disease onset. The underlying immunologic deficiencies enabling SARS-CoV-2 reinfections are currently unknown. Here we describe a renal transplant recipient who developed recurrent, symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection - confirmed by whole virus genome sequencing - 7 months after primary infection. To elucidate the immunological mechanisms responsible for SARS-CoV-2 reinfection, we performed longitudinal profiling of cellular and humoral responses during both primary and recurrent SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that the patient responded to the primary infection with transient, poor-quality adaptive immune responses. The patient's immune system was further compromised by intervening treatment for acute rejection of the renal allograft prior to reinfection. Importantly, we also identified the development of neutralizing antibodies and the formation of humoral memory responses prior to SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. However, these neutralizing antibodies failed to confer protection against reinfection, suggesting that additional factors are required for efficient prevention of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. Further, we found no evidence supporting viral evasion of primary adaptive immune responses, suggesting that susceptibility to reinfection may be determined by host factors rather than pathogen adaptation in this patient. In summary, our study suggests that a low neutralizing antibody presence alone is not sufficient to confer resistance against reinfection. Thus, patients with solid organ transplantation, or patients who are otherwise immunosuppressed, who recover from infection with SARS-CoV-2 may not develop sufficient protective immunity and are at risk of reinfection.

9.
Galbiati, C.; Abba, A.; Agnes, P.; Amaudruz, P.; Arba, M.; Ardellier-Desages, F.; Badia, C.; Batignani, G.; Bellani, G.; Bianchi, G.; Bishop, D.; Bocci, V.; Bonivento, W.; Bottino, B.; Bouchard, M.; Brice, S.; Buccino, G.; Bussino, S.; Caminata, A.; Capra, A.; Caravati, M.; Carlini, M.; Carrozzi, L.; Cela, J. M.; Celano, B.; Charette, C.; Coelli, S.; Constable, M.; Cocco, V.; Croci, G.; Cudmore, S.; Molin, Dal, D'Auria, S.; D'Avenio, G.; DeRuiter, J.; Cecco, De, Lauretis, De, Tutto, Del, Devoto, A.; Dinon, T.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Fabbri, A.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Ford, R.; Foti, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Abia, Garcia, Giarratana, L. S.; Givoletti, J.; Givoletti, Mi, Gorini, G.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso, G.; Guescini, F.; Guetre, E.; Hadden, T.; Hall, J.; Heavey, A.; Hersak, G.; Hessey, N.; Ianni, An, Ienzi, C.; Ippolito, V.; Kendziora, C. L.; King, M.; Kittmer, A.; Kochanek, I.; Kruecken, R.; Commara, La, Leblond, G.; Li, X.; Lim, C.; Lindner, T.; Lombardi, T.; Long, T.; Lu, P.; Lukhanin, G.; Magni, G.; Maharaj, R.; Malosio, M.; Mapelli, C.; Maqueo, P.; Margetak, P.; Mari, S. M.; Martin, L.; Massacret, N.; McDonald, A.; Minuzzo, D.; Mohayai, T. A.; Tosatti, Molinari, Moretti, C.; Muraro, A.; Nati, F.; Noble, A. J.; Norrick, A.; Olchanski, K.; Palumbo, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paoli, N.; Pearson, C.; Pellegrino, C.; Pesudo, V.; Pocar, A.; Pontesilli, M.; Pordes, R.; Pordes, S.; Prini, A.; Putignano, O.; Raaf, J. L.; Razeti, M.; Razeto, A.; Reed, D.; Renshaw, A.; Rescigno, M.; Retiere, F.; Rignanese, L. P.; Rode, J.; Romualdez, L. J.; Santorelli, R.; Sablone, D.; Scapparone, E.; Schaubel, T.; Shaw, B.; Slutsky, A. S.; Smith, B.; Smith, N. J. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Spinella, F.; Stenzler, A.; Steri, A.; Stiaccini, L.; Stoughton, C.; Stringari, P.; Tardocchi, M.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Tintori, C.; Tonazzo, A.; Tseng, J.; Viscione, E.; Vivaldi, F.; Wada, M.; Wang, H.; Westerdale, S.; Yue, S.; Zardoni, A..
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310788

ABSTRACT

Presented here is the design of the Mechanical Ventilator Milano (MVM), a novel mechanical ventilator designed for rapid mass production in response to the COVID-19 pandemic to address the urgent shortage of intensive therapy ventilators in many countries, and the growing difficulty in procuring these devices through normal supply chains across borders. This ventilator is an electro-mechanical equivalent of the old and reliable Manley Ventilator, and is able to operate in both pressure-controlled and pressure-supported ventilation modes. MVM is optimized for the COVID-19 emergency, thanks to the collaboration with medical doctors in the front line. MVM is designed for large-scale production in a short amount of time and at a limited cost, as it relays on off-the-shelf components, readily available worldwide. Operation of the MVM requires only a source of compressed oxygen (or compressed medical air) and electrical power. Initial tests of a prototype device with a breathing simulator are also presented. Further tests and developments are underway. At this stage the MVM is not yet a certified medical device but certification is in progress.

10.
Gastroenterology ; 160(6):S-681, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1592043

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The biopsychosocial model has been used to describe the complex pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), and the literature is clear that conventional medical treatment alone is often inadequate and should be supplemented with behavioral and/or dietary treatment. We hypothesized that the implementation of a multidisciplinary clinic for children with FGIDs would lead to decreased healthcare utilization. Our objective was to compare healthcare utilization before and after the initial visit in a pediatric multidisciplinary FGID clinic. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of children seen in the FGID clinic at our institution for their initial visit from March 2018-November 2019 (to avoid any impact of the COVID-19 pandemic). Our FGID clinic sees patients referred from other gastroenterologists. The initial visit is a 60-minute visit with a pediatric gastroenterologist, psychologist, and at times a dietitian. We recorded baseline characteristics and clinic visit information. To evaluate impact on healthcare utilization, we compared phone calls, electronic messages, additional outpatient GI visits, emergency department (ED) or urgent care (UC) visits, and hospitalizations for GI symptoms three months before and after a patient's initial FGID clinic visit. Results: We included 49 patients (76% female, median age 16 years, range 5-19). Primary FGID diagnoses were functional abdominal pain (45%), irritable bowel syndrome (22%), functional dyspepsia (20%), rumination syndrome (6%), functional constipation (4%), and abdominal migraine (2%). Other diagnoses included anxiety (73%), depression (33%), and inflammatory bowel disease (2%). Prior testing included blood tests (86%), imaging (82%), esophagogastroduodenoscopy (78%), colonoscopy (35%), and manometry testing (31%). At the initial visit, 71% were on a medication for their GI symptoms, 76% were on a supplement or probiotic, and 35% were on a psychiatric medication. During their initial visit, 96% met with a psychologist and 18% met with a dietitian. Recommendations at the initial visit included new medications (76%), follow up with a GI psychologist (45%), dietary treatment (22%), imaging studies (16%), manometry testing (10%), psychiatry referral (10%), blood tests (8%), esophagogastroduodenoscopy (4%), and colonoscopy (2%). As shown in Table 1, total phone calls, electronic messages, and ED/UC visits for GI symptoms decreased after the FGID clinic visit (p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.02 respectively). Conclusion: Healthcare utilization decreased significantly after children with FGIDs were seen in a multidisciplinary FGID clinic. Our findings imply that establishing a multidisciplinary FGID clinic improves the care of children with these disorders and may also reduce the time and financial costs of caring for these disorders.(Table Presented)

12.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-296673

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 remdesivir resistance mutations have been generated in vitro but have not been reported in patients receiving treatment with the antiviral agent. We present a case of an immunocompromised patient with acquired B-cell deficiency who developed an indolent, protracted course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Remdesivir therapy alleviated symptoms and produced a transient virologic response, but her course was complicated by recrudescence of high-grade viral shedding. Whole genome sequencing identified a mutation, E802D, in the nsp12 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which was not present in pre-treatment specimens. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the mutation conferred a ~6-fold increase in remdesivir IC50 but resulted in a fitness cost in the absence of remdesivir. Sustained clinical and virologic response was achieved after treatment with casirivimab-imdevimab. Although the fitness cost observed in vitro may limit the risk posed by E802D, this case illustrates the importance of monitoring for remdesivir resistance and the potential benefit of combinatorial therapies in immunocompromised patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

13.
Chinese Journal of Emergency Medicine ; 30(10):1220-1228, 2021.
Article in Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1576023

ABSTRACT

Objective To summarize the clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infected with Delta variant, so as to provide further references for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods A real-world study was conducted to analyze the characteristics of 166 COVID-19 patients infected with Delta variant at Guangzhou Eighth People’s Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University. Results The study enrolled 5 asymptomatic cases, 123 non-severe cases (mild and moderate type), and 38 severe cases (severe and critical type). Among these patients, 69 (41.6%) were male and 97 (58.4%) were female, with a mean age of 47.0±23.5 years. Thirty-nine cases (23.5%) had received 1 or 2 doses of inactivated vaccine. The incidence of severe COVID-19 cases was 7.7% in 2-doses vaccinated patients, which was lower than that of 11.5% in 1-dose and 26.8% in unvaccinated patients. The proportion of severe cases in 2 dose-vaccinated patients was 7.7%, which was lower than that of 11.5% in 1-dose vaccinated patients and 26.8% in unvaccinated patients, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). The most common clinical symptom was fever (134 cases, 83.2%), and 39.1% of cases presented with high-grade fever (≥ 39 °C);other symptoms were cough, sputum, fatigue, and xerostomia. The proportion of fever in severe cases was significantly higher than that of non-severe cases (97.4% vs. 76.4%, P<0.01). Similarly, the proportion of severe cases with high peak temperature (≥ 39 ℃) () was also higher than that of non-severe cases (65.8% vs. 30.9%, P<0.01). The median minimal Cycle threshold (Ct) values of viral nucleic acid N gene and ORFlab gene were 20.3 and 21.5, respectively, and the minimum Ct values were 11.9 and 13.5, respectively. Within 48 h of admission, 9.0% of cases presented with decreased white blood cell counts, and 52.4% with decreased lymphocyte counts. The proportions of increased C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, interleukin 6, and interleukin 10 were 32.5%, 57.4%, 65.3%, and 35.7%, respectively. The proportions of elevated C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A and interleukin-6 in severe cases were significantly higher than those in non-severe cases (P<0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that older age and higher peak temperature were associated with a higher likelihood of severe cases (OR>3, 95% CI: 2-7, P<0.01). In terms of treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) was used in 97.6% of non-severe cases and 100% in severe cases. Other treatments included respiratory and nutritional support, immunotherapy (such as neutralizing antibodies and plasma of recovered patients). The median times from admission to progression to severe cases, of fever clearance, and of nucleic acid conversion were 5 days, 6 days and 19 days, respectively. No deaths were reported within 28 days. Conclusions The symptoms of Delta variant infection in Guangzhou are characterized by a high proportion of fever, high peak temperature, long duration of fever, high viral load, a long time to nucleic acid conversion, and a high incidence of severe cases. The severe cases exhibit a higher percentage of elderly patients, a longer duration of fever and have a higher fever rate and a higher hyperthermia rate than non-severe cases. Age and hyperthermia are independent risk factors for progression to severe disease. The combination of TCM and Western medicine can control the progression of the disease effectively. © 2021 Chinese Medical Association. All rights reserved.

14.
Journal of Immunology ; 206:2, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1548310
15.
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition ; 73(1 SUPPL 1):S254-S255, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1529324

ABSTRACT

Background: Rumination syndrome is a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) that involves effortless postprandial regurgitation of food followed either by rechewing or expulsion, and can be challenging to both diagnose and treat effectively. Patients with more severe symptoms require intensive management. At our institution, we have had success treating children with severe rumination syndrome using a multidisciplinary intensive outpatient program (IOP) involving multiple treatment sessions daily. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have needed to transition from in-person treatment to telemedicine. The objective of this study is to compare outcomes of patients with rumination syndrome who completed IOP treatment in person versus by telemedicine. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with rumination syndrome by Rome IV criteria and participated in IOP treatment from 2018-2020. IOP consists of intensive medical and behavioral treatment provided by a specialized multidisciplinary team. Until March 2020, this program involved 3 in-person treatment sessions with meals per day for up to a week. Similar treatment sessions were performed during telemedicine visits. We compared outcomes of patients who received IOP treatment in person versus by telemedicine. Families/patients were then asked to complete a survey outlining their child's current rumination symptom severity and review of the IOP. Results: We included 34 patients (79% F, median age 15 years, range 7-19 years) with rumination syndrome who completed IOP treatment. Patients had also been diagnosed with anxiety (17/34, 50%), depression (7/34, 21%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (6/34, 18%), constipation (6/34, 18%), functional abdominal pain (5/34, 15%), eating disorder (5/34, 15%), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome (4/34, 12%). At baseline, 9 patients (26%) required tube feeding or parenteral nutrition compared to 2 patients (6%) at follow up. Twenty-six patients (76%) were treated in person and 8 patients (24%) by telemedicine. There were no significant differences in sex, age, likelihood of anxiety or depression, and duration of IOP treatment between in person and telemedicine groups. The median duration of treatment for both groups was 4 days. Symptom severity at baseline and follow up are described in Table 1. For patients treated in person, 76% (19/25) had improvement in symptoms while 16% (4/25) had complete resolution of symptoms. For patients treated by telemedicine, 88% (7/8) had improvement in their symptoms. There were no significant differences between groups in likelihood of improvement. Of the 34 patients who completed the IOP, 23 (68%) completed both surveys. Overall, 78% (18/23) preferred in person therapy while 17% (4/23) did not have a preference. Of the telemedicine patients, 60% (3/5) would have preferred in-person IOP. All 18 of the in-person cohort preferred in-person management. When asked to elaborate, 4 families expressed similar answers including the need for “in-person interaction,” having a “hands-on approach,” and because the psychologist can give “body instructions.” Other reported strengths of in-person treatment included a majority of families believing this would lead to “a stronger connection with the provider” (90%, 19/21), “fewer distractions” (86%, 18/21), and noting “treatment would be more effective in person” (76%, 16/21). In-person challenges included transportation and parking (63%, 12/19) as well as concerns about time commitment (84%, 16/19). The primary strengths of online treatment were that it saves time (72%,13/18) and some parents felt their child was more comfortable at home (39%,7/18). One family described that it was “easier to integrate habits at home” after completing the process online. Online challenges included having more distractions (81%, 13/16) and some parents felt their child was more comfortable talking to someone in person (75%, 12/16). Conclusion: Although multidisciplinary intensive outpatient treatment for children and adolescents with severe rumination syndrome is effective and the likelihood of improvement appears similar when completed in person or by telemedicine, the majority of families prefer in-person therapy.

16.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-8853

ABSTRACT

The underlying immunologic deficiencies enabling SARS-CoV-2 reinfections are currently unknown. Here we describe a renal-transplant recipient who developed recurrent, symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection 7 months after primary infection. To elucidate the immunological mechanisms responsible for reinfection, we performed longitudinal profiling of cellular and humoral responses during both primary and recurrent SARS-CoV-2 infection. We found that the patient responded to the primary infection with transient, poor-quality adaptive immune responses that was further compromised by intervening treatment for acute rejection of the renal allograft prior to reinfection. Importantly, we identified the development of neutralizing antibodies and humoral memory responses prior to SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. However, these neutralizing antibodies failed to confer protection against reinfection, suggesting that additional factors are required for efficient prevention of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. Further, we found no evidence supporting viral evasion of primary adaptive immune responses, suggesting that susceptibility to reinfection may be determined by host factors rather than pathogen adaptation.

17.
PubMed; 2020.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-6292

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- Coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) has caused over 5,000,000 cases of Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) with significant fatality rate. Due to the urgency of this global pandemic, numerous therapeutic and vaccine trials have begun without customary safety and efficacy studies. Laboratory mice have been the stalwart of these types of studies;however, they do not support infection by SARS-CoV-2 due to the inability of its spike (S) protein to engage the mouse ortholog of its human entry receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2). While hACE2 transgenic mice support infection and pathogenesis, these mice are currently limited in availability and are restricted to a single genetic background. Here we report the development of a mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 based on adeno associated virus (AAV)-mediated expression of hACE2. These mice support viral replication and antibody production and exhibit pathologic findings found in COVID-19 patients as well as non-human primate models. Moreover, we show that type I interferons are unable to control SARS-CoV2 replication and drive pathologic responses. Thus, the hACE2-AAV mouse model enables rapid deployment for in-depth analysis following robust SARS-CoV-2 infection with authentic patient-derived virus in mice of diverse genetic backgrounds. This represents a much-needed platform for rapidly testing prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat COVID-19. Funding: This study was supported by awards from National Institute of Health grants, 2T32AI007517-16 (to BI), T32GM007205 and F30CA239444 (to ES), AI054359 and AI127429 (to AI), T32AI007019 (to TM),K08 AI128043 (to CBW), as well as Women's Health Research at Yale Pilot Project Program (AI, AR), Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures at the Mercatus Center (AI, ES), Mathers Foundation (AR, CBW, AI), and the Ludwig Family Foundation (AI, AR, CBW). A.I. is an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Conflict of Interest: None of the authors declare interests related to the manuscript. Ethical Approval: All procedures were performed in a BSL-3 facility (for SARS-CoV-2 infected mice) with approval from the Yale Environmental Health and Safety office.

19.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(8): 1220-1224, 2020 Aug 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739002

ABSTRACT

Objective: To understand the epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 monitoring cases in Yinzhou district based on health big data platform to provide evidence for the construction of COVID-19 monitoring system. Methods: Data on Yinzhou COVID-19 daily surveillance were collected. Information on patients' population classification, epidemiological history, COVID-19 nucleic acid detection rate, positive detection rate and confirmed cases monitoring detection rate were analyzed. Results: Among the 1 595 COVID-19 monitoring cases, 79.94% were community population and 20.06% were key population. The verification rate of monitoring cases was 100.00%. The total percentage of epidemiological history related to Wuhan city or Hubei province was 6.27% in total, and was 2.12% in community population and 22.81% in key population (P<0.001). The total COVID-19 nucleic acid detection rate was 18.24% (291/1 595), and 53.00% in those with epidemiological history and 15.92% in those without (P<0.001).The total positive detection rate was 1.72% (5/291) and the confirmed cases monitoring detection rate was 0.31% (5/1 595). The time interval from the first visit to the first nucleic acid detection of the confirmed monitoring cases and other confirmed cases was statistically insignificant (P>0.05). Conclusions: The monitoring system of COVID-19 based on the health big data platform was working well but the confirmed cases monitoring detection rate need to be improved.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Big Data , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cities , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics , Population Surveillance , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(10): 1611-1615, 2020 Oct 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641629

ABSTRACT

During the prevention and control of the COVID-19 epidemic, identifying and controlling the source of infection has become one of the most important prevention and control measures to curb the epidemic in the absence of vaccines and specific therapeutic drugs. While actively taking traditional and comprehensive "early detection" measures, Yinzhou district implemented inter-departmental data sharing through the joint prevention and control mechanism. Relying on a healthcare big data platform that integrates the data from medical, disease control and non-health sectors, Yinzhou district innovatively explored the big data-driven COVID-19 case finding pattern with online suspected case screening and offline verification and disposal. Such effort has laid a solid foundation and gathered experience to conduct the dynamic and continuous surveillance and early warning for infectious disease outbreaks more effectively and efficiently in the future. This article introduces the exploration of this pattern in Yinzhou district and discusses the role of big data-driven disease surveillance in the prevention and control of infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Big Data , China , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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