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4.
Am Surg ; 87(7): 1021-1024, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379708

ABSTRACT

Social media has become a permeating form of communication with billions of daily users. Twitter in particular has become a tool for the surgical community to engage with other providers, as well as patients, through active online discussions, sharing of research, and highlighting opportunities for community outreach. Twitter can help with personal branding, mentorship, and international collaboration on multiple types of academic endeavors. Likewise, institutional and residency programs can harness the power of social media to develop an online presence and aid in resident recruitment.


Subject(s)
General Surgery , Social Media , Humans
5.
Artif Organs ; 45(3): E26-E37, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354461
7.
Innovations (Phila) ; 16(4): 350-357, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282223

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We report the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on cardiac surgery trainee education in North America. METHODS: A survey was sent to participating academic adult cardiac surgery centers in North America. Data regarding the effect of COVID-19 on cardiac surgery training were analyzed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 53 academic institutions with diverse geographic distribution. Cardiac surgery trainee re-deployment to alternative clinical duties peaked at the height of the pandemic. We stratified institutions based on high (n = 20) and low burden (n = 33) of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The majority of institutions have converted didactics (high burden 90% vs low burden 73%) and interviews for jobs/fellowships (high burden 75% vs low burden 73%) from in-person to virtual. Institutions were mixed in preference for administration of the licensing examination, with the most common preference for examinations to be held remotely on normal timeline (high burden 45% vs low burden 30%) or in person with more than 3-month delay (high burden 20% vs low burden 33%). Despite the challenges experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic on trainee clinical experience, re-deployment, and decreased operative volume, institutions expected their trainees to graduate on schedule (high burden 95% vs low burden 91%). CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that actions taken during the COVID-19 pandemic has led to disruptions in cardiac surgery training with transition of didactics and interviews virtually and re-deployment to alternative duties. Despite this, institutions remain optimistic that their trainees will graduate on schedule.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , North America/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Card Surg ; 36(9): 3296-3305, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282008

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted all aspects of healthcare, including cardiothoracic surgery (CTS). We sought to determine the pandemic's impact on CTS trainees' educational experiences. METHODS: A survey was developed and distributed to members of the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and other international CTS trainees. Trainees were asked to evaluate their cumulative experiences and share their overall perceptions of how CTS training had been impacted during the earliest months of the COVID-19 pandemic (i.e., since March 01, 2020). Surveys were distributed and responses were recorded June 25-August 05, 2020. In total, 748 surveys were distributed and 166 responses were received (overall response rate 22.2%). Of these, 126 of 166 responses (75.9%) met inclusion criteria for final analysis. RESULTS: Final responses analyzed included 45 of 126 (35.7%) United States (US) and 81 of 126 (64.3%) international trainees, including 101 of 126 (80.2%) senior and 25 of 126 (19.8%) junior trainees. Most respondents (76/126, 43.2%) lost over 1 week in the hospital due to the pandemic. Juniors (12/25, 48.0%) were more likely than seniors (20/101, 19.8%) to be reassigned to COVID-19-specific units (p < .01). Half of trainees (63/126) reported their case volumes were reduced by over 50%. US trainees (42/45, 93.3%) were more likely than international trainees (58/81, 71.6%) to report reduced operative case volumes (p < .01). Most trainees (104/126, 83%) believed their overall clinical acumen was not adversely impacted by the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: CTS trainees in the United States and abroad have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, with time lost in the hospital, decreased operative experiences, less time on CTS services, and frequent reassignment to COVID-19-specific care settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Specialties, Surgical , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Workforce
9.
J Card Surg ; 36(9): 3040-3051, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on health care and cardiac surgery. We report cardiac surgeons' concerns, perceptions, and responses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A detailed survey was sent to recruit participating adult cardiac surgery centers in North America. Data regarding cardiac surgeons' perceptions and changes in practice were analyzed. RESULTS: Our study comprises 67 institutions with diverse geographic distribution across North America. Nurses were most likely to be redeployed (88%), followed by advanced care practitioners (69%), trainees (28%), and surgeons (25%). Examining surgeon concerns in regard to COVID-19, they were most worried with exposing their family to COVID-19 (81%), followed by contracting COVID-19 (68%), running out of personal protective equipment (PPE) (28%), and hospital resources (28%). In terms of PPE conservation strategies among users of N95 respirators, nearly half were recycling via decontamination with ultraviolet light (49%), followed by sterilization with heat (13%) and at home or with other modalities (13%). Reuse of N95 respirators for 1 day (22%), 1 week (21%) or 1 month (6%) was reported. There were differences in adoption of methods to conserve N95 respirators based on institutional pandemic phase and COVID-19 burden, with higher COVID-19 burden institutions more likely to resort to PPE conservation strategies. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates the impact of COVID-19 on North American cardiac surgeons. Our study should stimulate further discussions to identify optimal solutions to improve workforce preparedness for subsequent surges, as well as facilitate the navigation of future healthcare crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Adult , Decontamination , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 162(3): 893-903.e4, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704188

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in an increase in hospital resource utilization and the need to defer nonurgent cardiac surgery procedures. The present study aims to report the regional variations of North American adult cardiac surgical case volume and case mix through the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A survey was sent to recruit participating adult cardiac surgery centers in North America. Data in regard to changes in institutional and regional cardiac surgical case volume and mix were analyzed. RESULTS: Our study comprises 67 adult cardiac surgery institutions with diverse geographic distribution across North America, representing annualized case volumes of 60,452 in 2019. Nonurgent surgery was stopped during the month of March 2020 in the majority of centers (96%), resulting in a decline to 45% of baseline with significant regional variation. Hospitals with a high burden of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 demonstrated similar trends of decline in total volume as centers in low burden areas. As a proportion of total surgical volume, there was a relative increase of coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (high +7.2% vs low +4.2%, P = .550), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (high +2.5% vs low 0.4%, P = .328), and heart transplantation (high +2.7% vs low 0.4%, P = .090), and decline in valvular cases (high -7.6% vs low -2.6%, P = .195). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates the impact of COVID-19 on North American cardiac surgery institutions as well as helps associate region and COVID-19 burden with the impact on cardiac surgery volumes and case mix.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/trends , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Regional Health Planning/trends , Surgeons/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Needs Assessment/trends , North America , Time Factors
16.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 33(1)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615863

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 has, in the span of weeks, immobilized entire countries and mobilized leading institutions worldwide in a race towards treatments and preventions. Although several solutions such as telemedicine and online education platforms have been implemented to reduce human contact and further transmission, countries need to favour collectivism both within and beyond their borders. Inspired by experiences of previous outbreaks such as SARS in 2003 and Ebola in 2014-2015, global solidarity is a must in order to prevent further morbidity and mortality. Examples in leadership and collaborations ranging from research funds from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to mask donations by the Jack Ma Foundation should be celebrated as examples to follow. Open communication and transparency will be crucial in monitoring the evolution of the disease in the global effort of flattening the curve. This crisis will challenge the integrity and fuel innovation of health systems worldwide, whilst posing a new quality chasm that warrants increased recognition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , International Cooperation , Communication , Health Policy , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Health Care/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(1): 342, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-549141
18.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 110(6): 2107, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343489
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