Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Theranostics ; 12(6): 2519-2534, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771697

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Mutations of SARS-CoV-2, which is responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), could impede drug development and reduce the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines. Here, we developed a multiplexed Spike-ACE2 Inhibitor Screening (mSAIS) assay that can measure the neutralizing effect of antibodies across numerous variants of the coronavirus's Spike (S) protein simultaneously. Methods: The SARS-CoV-2 spike variant protein microarrays were prepared by printing 72 S variants onto a chemically-modified glass slides. The neutralization potential of purified anti-S antibodies and serum from convalescent COVID-19 patients and vaccinees to S variants were assessed with the mSAIS assay. Results: We identified new S mutations that are sensitive and resistant to neutralization. Serum from both infected and vaccinated groups with a high titer of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) displayed a broader capacity to neutralize S variants than serum with low titer NAbs. These data were validated using serum from a large vaccinated cohort (n = 104) with a tiled S peptide microarray. In addition, similar results were obtained using a SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus neutralization assay specific for wild-type S and five prevalent S variants (D614G, B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, B.1.617.2), thus demonstrating that high antibody diversity is associated with high NAb titers. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the utility of the mSAIS platform in screening NAbs. Moreover, we show that heterogeneous antibody populations provide a more protective effect against S variants, which may help direct COVID-19 vaccine and drug development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination
2.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 749-752, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699338

ABSTRACT

The immunity potency upon natural infection or vaccination is the main concern for the vaccine strategy of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS COV-2 variant), especially the recently reported Omicron variant (B.1.1.529). In this study, 200 recipients immunized with three doses of a COVID-19-inactivated vaccine were enrolled, whose serum samples were collected within 2 months after the third immunization. The neutralizing activity of sera against the pseudotyped Omicron variant, prototype, and Delta variant was determined. Our results demonstrated that the positive neutralization activity was 95.5% for the Omicron variant, 99.5% for the prototype, and 98.5% for the Delta variant. The geometric mean titers (GMT) for the Omicron variant was 49 and maintained sustained immune levels for 2 months, which decreased by 4.9-fold and 3.0-fold compared with the prototype (GMT, 239) and Delta variant (GMT, 148), respectively. In summary, our study demonstrated that three doses of a COVID-19-inactivated vaccine effectively yielded potent cross-neutralizing activity against the Omicron variant at 2 months after the third vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
3.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 337-343, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585241

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACTThe emerging new VOC B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant has raised serious concerns due to multiple mutations, reported significant immune escape, and unprecedented rapid spreading speed. Currently, studies describing the neutralization ability of different homologous and heterologous booster vaccination against Omicron are still lacking. In this study, we explored the immunogenicity of COVID-19 breakthrough patients, BBIBP-CorV homologous booster group and BBIBP-CorV/ZF2001 heterologous booster group against SARS-CoV-2 pseudotypes corresponding to the prototype, Beta, Delta, and the emergent Omicron variant.Notably, at 14 days post two-dose inactivated vaccines, pVNT titre increased to 67.4 GMTs against prototype, 8.85 against Beta and 35.07 against Delta, while neutralization activity against Omicron was below the lower limit of quantitation in 80% of the samples. At day 14 post BBIBP-CorV homologous booster vaccination, GMTs of pVNT significantly increased to 285.6, 215.7, 250.8, 48.73 against prototype, Beta, Delta, and Omicron, while at day 14 post ZF2001 heterologous booster vaccination, GMTs of pVNT significantly increased to 1436.00, 789.6, 1501.00, 95.86, respectively. Post booster vaccination, 100% samples showed positive neutralization activity against Omicron, albeit illustrated a significant reduction (5.86- to 14.98-fold) of pVNT against Omicron compared to prototype at 14 days after the homologous or heterologous vaccine boosters.Overall, our study demonstrates that vaccine-induced immune protection might more likely be escaped by Omicron compared to prototypes and other VOCs. After two doses of inactivated whole-virion vaccines as the "priming" shot, a third heterologous protein subunit vaccine and a homologous inactivated vaccine booster could improve neutralization against Omicron.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Immune Sera/immunology , Immunization, Secondary , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination
4.
Front Vet Sci ; 8: 572012, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574919

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused great harm to global public health, resulting in a large number of infections among the population. However, the epidemiology of coronavirus has not been fully understood, especially the mechanism of aerosol transmission. Many respiratory viruses can spread via contact and droplet transmission, but increasing epidemiological data have shown that viral aerosol is an essential transmission route of coronavirus and influenza virus due to its ability to spread rapidly and high infectiousness. Aerosols have the characteristics of small particle size, long-time suspension and long-distance transmission, and easy access to the deep respiratory tract, leading to a high infection risk and posing a great threat to public health. In this review, the characteristics of viral aerosol generation, transmission, and infection as well as the current advances in the aerosol transmission of zoonotic coronavirus and influenza virus are summarized. The aim of the review is to strengthen the understanding of viral aerosol transmission and provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of these diseases.

5.
Psychother Psychosom ; 90(2): 127-136, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913881

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the fight against the COVID-19 epidemic continues, medical workers may have allostatic load. OBJECTIVE: During the reopening of society, medical and nonmedical workers were compared in terms of allostatic load. METHODS: An online study was performed; 3,590 Chinese subjects were analyzed. Socio-demographic variables, allostatic load, stress, abnormal illness behavior, global well-being, mental status, and social support were assessed. RESULTS: There was no difference in allostatic load in medical workers compared to nonmedical workers (15.8 vs. 17.8%; p = 0.22). Multivariate conditional logistic regression revealed that anxiety (OR = 1.24; 95% CI 1.18-1.31; p < 0.01), depression (OR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.17-1.29; p < 0.01), somatization (OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.14-1.25; p < 0.01), hostility (OR = 1.24; 95% CI 1.18-1.30; p < 0.01), and abnormal illness behavior (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.34-1.66; p < 0.01) were positively associated with allostatic load, while objective support (OR = 0.84; 95% CI 0.78-0.89; p < 0.01), subjective support (OR = 0.84; 95% CI 0.80-0.88; p < 0.01), utilization of support (OR = 0.80; 95% CI 0.72-0.88; p < 0.01), social support (OR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.87-0.93; p < 0.01), and global well-being (OR = 0.30; 95% CI 0.22-0.41; p < 0.01) were negatively associated. CONCLUSIONS: In the post-COVID-19 epidemic time, medical and nonmedical workers had similar allostatic load. Psychological distress and abnormal illness behavior were risk factors for it, while social support could relieve it.


Subject(s)
Allostasis/physiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Depression/physiopathology , Health Personnel , Illness Behavior/physiology , Personal Satisfaction , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Adult , China , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupations
6.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 98(4): 115199, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741168

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 positive (194) and negative (212) pneumonia patients were selected to analyze bacterial pathogens coinfection. Results showed that 50% of COVID-19 patients were coinfected or carried bacterial pathogens. Bordetella pertussis infection rate was significantly higher in positive patients. Consequently, preventions should be taken to control bacterial pathogens coinfection in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pseudomonas Infections/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Bordetella pertussis/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/pathology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL