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1.
Vaccine ; 2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882618

ABSTRACT

The mass inoculation of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine to induce herd immunity is one of the most effective measures to fight COVID-19. The vaccination of pregnant women cannot only avoid or reduce the probability of infectious diseases, but also offers the most effective and direct protection for neonates by means of passive immunization. However, there is no randomized clinical data to ascertain whether the inactivated vaccination of pregnant women or women of childbearing age can affect conception and the fetus. We found that human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) mice that were vaccinated with two doses of CoronaVac (an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine) before and during pregnancy exhibited normal weight changes and reproductive performance indices; the physical development of their offspring was also normal. Following intranasal inoculation with SARS-CoV-2, pregnant mice in the immunization group all survived; reproductive performance indices and the physical development of offspring were all normal. In contrast, mice in the non-immunization group all died before delivery. Analyses showed that inoculation of CoronaVac was safe and did not exert any significant effects on pregnancy, lactation, or the growth of offspring in hACE2 mice. Vaccination effectively protected the pregnant mice against SARS-CoV-2 infection and had no adverse effects on the growth and development of the offspring, thus suggesting that inoculation with an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine may be an effective strategy to prevent infection in pregnant women.

2.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 124, 2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795804

ABSTRACT

Variants of concern (VOCs) like Delta and Omicron, harbor a high number of mutations, which aid these viruses in escaping a majority of known SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). In this study, Rhesus macaques immunized with 2-dose inactivated vaccines (Coronavac) were boosted with an additional dose of homologous vaccine or an RBD-subunit vaccine, or a bivalent inactivated vaccine (Beta and Delta) to determine the effectiveness of sequential immunization. The booster vaccination significantly enhanced the duration and levels of neutralizing antibody titers against wild-type, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Animals administered with an indicated booster dose and subsequently challenged with Delta or Omicron variants showed markedly reduced viral loads and improved histopathological profiles compared to control animals, indicating that sequential immunization could protect primates against Omicron. These results suggest that sequential immunization of inactivated vaccines or polyvalent vaccines could be a potentially effective countermeasure against newly emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/genetics
3.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 5(1): 89-93, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712020

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Omicron (B.1.1.529) SARS-COV-2 variant has raised serious concerns because of its unprecedented rapid rate of spreading and the fact that there are 36 mutations in the spike protein. Since the vaccine-induced neutralizing antibody targets are the spike protein, this may lead to the possibility of vaccine-induced humoral immunity escape. METHODS: We measured the neutralizing activity in vitro for Omicron and compared this with wild type (WH-09) and Delta variants in human and monkey sera from different types of immunity. The monkey sera samples were collected at 1 and 3 months post three-dose inactivated (PiCoVacc) and recombinant protein (ZF2001) vaccination. Human sera were collected from 1 month post three-dose inactivated vaccination. RESULTS: In inactivated vaccine sera, at 1/3 months post three-dose, geometric mean titers (GMTs) of neutralization antibody (NAb) against the Omicron variant were 4.9/5.2-fold lower than those of the wild type. In recombinant protein vaccine sera, GMTs of NAb against Omicron were 15.7/8.9-fold lower than those of the wild type. In human sera, at 1 month post three-dose inactivated vaccination, GMTs of NAb against Omicron were 3.1-fold lower than those of the wild type. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that despite a reduction in neutralization titers, cross-neutralizing activity against Omicron and Delta variants was still observed after three doses of inactivated and recombinant protein vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Cross Reactions , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Haplorhini , Humans , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323719

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 has led to a worldwide health crisis. The ACE2 has been identified as the entry receptor in a species-specific manner. Classic laboratory mice were insusceptible since the virus cannot use murine ACE2 orthologue. Animal models rely on gene modification on the virus or the host. However, these mice were restricted in limited genetic backgrounds and did not support natural infection. Here we showed two wild-type inbred lines (CAST and FEW) from Genetic Diversity mice supported authentic SARS-CoV-2 infection, and developed mild to moderate interstitial pneumonia, along with infiltrating inflammatory cells. Particularly, FEW featured age-dependent damages, while CAST charactered by pulmonary fibrosis. Genome and transcriptome comparative analysis suggested the mutated ACE2 was not responsible for SARS-CoV-2 infection in CAST and FEW, and the differential gene expressions in immune response and immune cell may be risk factors for the infection. In summary, the GD mice, derived from the multi-parental panel, provided promising murine models for exploring sophisticated pathogenesis in SARS-CoV-2.

5.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 29, 2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655546

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is transmitted on mink farms between minks and humans in many countries. However, the systemic pathological features of SARS-CoV-2-infected minks are mostly unknown. Here, we demonstrated that minks were largely permissive to SARS-CoV-2, characterized by severe and diffuse alveolar damage, and lasted at least 14 days post inoculation (dpi). We first reported that infected minks displayed multiple organ-system lesions accompanied by an increased inflammatory response and widespread viral distribution in the cardiovascular, hepatobiliary, urinary, endocrine, digestive, and immune systems. The viral protein partially co-localized with activated Mac-2+ macrophages throughout the body. Moreover, we first found that the alterations in lipids and metabolites were correlated with the histological lesions in infected minks, especially at 6 dpi, and were similar to that of patients with severe and fatal COVID-19. Particularly, altered metabolic pathways, abnormal digestion, and absorption of vitamins, lipids, cholesterol, steroids, amino acids, and proteins, consistent with hepatic dysfunction, highlight metabolic and immune dysregulation. Enriched kynurenine in infected minks contributed to significant activation of the kynurenine pathway and was related to macrophage activation. Melatonin, which has significant anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, was significantly downregulated at 6 dpi and displayed potential as a targeted medicine. Our data first illustrate systematic analyses of infected minks to recapitulate those observations in severe and fetal COVID-19 patients, delineating a useful animal model to mimic SARS-CoV-2-induced systematic and severe pathophysiological features and provide a reliable tool for the development of effective and targeted treatment strategies, vaccine research, and potential biomarkers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , Metabolome , Mink/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Amino Acids/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/pathology , Macrophages, Alveolar/virology , Melatonin/metabolism , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sterols/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Replication/genetics
6.
Acta Pharm Sin B ; 11(9): 2850-2858, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415197

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection severely threatens global health and economic development. No effective antiviral drug is currently available to treat COVID-19 and any other human coronavirus infections. We report herein that a macrolide antibiotic, carrimycin, potently inhibited the cytopathic effects (CPE) and reduced the levels of viral protein and RNA in multiple cell types infected by human coronavirus 229E, OC43, and SARS-CoV-2. Time-of-addition and pseudotype virus infection studies indicated that carrimycin inhibited one or multiple post-entry replication events of human coronavirus infection. In support of this notion, metabolic labelling studies showed that carrimycin significantly inhibited the synthesis of viral RNA. Our studies thus strongly suggest that carrimycin is an antiviral agent against a broad-spectrum of human coronaviruses and its therapeutic efficacy to COVID-19 is currently under clinical investigation.

7.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 337, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402050

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has been reported to show a capacity for invading the brains of humans and model animals. However, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Herein, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was occasionally detected in the vascular wall and perivascular space, as well as in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) in the infected K18-hACE2 transgenic mice. Moreover, the permeability of the infected vessel was increased. Furthermore, disintegrity of BBB was discovered in the infected hamsters by administration of Evans blue. Interestingly, the expression of claudin5, ZO-1, occludin and the ultrastructure of tight junctions (TJs) showed unchanged, whereas, the basement membrane was disrupted in the infected animals. Using an in vitro BBB model that comprises primary BMECs with astrocytes, SARS-CoV-2 was found to infect and cross through the BMECs. Consistent with in vivo experiments, the expression of MMP9 was increased and collagen IV was decreased while the markers for TJs were not altered in the SARS-CoV-2-infected BMECs. Besides, inflammatory responses including vasculitis, glial activation, and upregulated inflammatory factors occurred after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Overall, our results provide evidence supporting that SARS-CoV-2 can cross the BBB in a transcellular pathway accompanied with basement membrane disrupted without obvious alteration of TJs.


Subject(s)
Basement Membrane/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Basement Membrane/pathology , Basement Membrane/virology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/genetics , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tight Junctions/genetics , Tight Junctions/pathology , Tight Junctions/virology , Vero Cells
9.
Stem Cells Int ; 2021: 5593584, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262418

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has so far resulted in over a hundred million people being infected. COVID-19 poses a threat to human health around the world. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been confirmed as the pathogenic virus of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the ß-coronavirus family of viruses and is mainly transmitted through the respiratory tract. It has been proven that SARS-CoV-2 mainly targets angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2) receptors on the surface of various cells in humans. The main clinical symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Current evidence suggests that the damage caused by the virus may be closely related to the induction of cytokine storms in COVID-19. No specific drugs or measures have yet to be shown to cure COVID-19 completely. Cell-based approaches, primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been identified to have anti-inflammatory and immune functions in COVID-19. Clinical studies about using MSCs and its derivatives-exosomes for COVID-19 treatment-are under investigation. Here, we review the current progress of the biological characteristics, clinical manifestations, and cell-based treatment development for COVID-19. Providing up-to-date information on COVID-19 and potential MSC therapies will help highlight routes to prevent and treat the disease.

10.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 200, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237988

ABSTRACT

Influenza A virus may circulate simultaneously with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, leading to more serious respiratory diseases during this winter. However, the influence of these viruses on disease outcome when both influenza A and SARS-CoV-2 are present in the host remains unclear. Using a mammalian model, sequential infection was performed in ferrets and in K18-hACE2 mice, with SARS-CoV-2 infection following H1N1. We found that co-infection with H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 extended the duration of clinical manifestation of COVID-19, and enhanced pulmonary damage, but reduced viral shedding of throat swabs and viral loads in the lungs of ferrets. Moreover, mortality was increased in sequentially infected mice compared with single-infection mice. Compared with single-vaccine inoculation, co-inoculation of PiCoVacc (a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine) and the flu vaccine showed no significant differences in neutralizing antibody titers or virus-specific immune responses. Combined immunization effectively protected K18-hACE2 mice against both H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our findings indicated the development of systematic models of co-infection of H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2, which together notably enhanced pneumonia in ferrets and mice, as well as demonstrated that simultaneous vaccination against H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 may be an effective prevention strategy for the coming winter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/immunology , Coinfection/pathology , Coinfection/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Ferrets , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology
11.
Cell Discov ; 7(1): 24, 2021 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182824

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) invades the alveoli, where abundant alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside. How AMs respond to SARS-CoV-2 invasion remains elusive. Here, we show that classically activated M1 AMs facilitate viral spread; however, alternatively activated M2 AMs limit the spread. M1 AMs utilize cellular softness to efficiently take up SARS-CoV-2. Subsequently, the invaded viruses take over the endo-lysosomal system to escape. M1 AMs have a lower endosomal pH, favoring membrane fusion and allowing the entry of viral RNA from the endosomes into the cytoplasm, where the virus achieves replication and is packaged to be released. In contrast, M2 AMs have a higher endosomal pH but a lower lysosomal pH, thus delivering the virus to lysosomes for degradation. In hACE2 transgenic mouse model, M1 AMs are found to facilitate SARS-CoV-2 infection of the lungs. These findings provide insights into the complex roles of AMs during SARS-CoV-2 infection, along with potential therapeutic targets.

13.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 4(1): 2-15, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122088

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are top two chronic comorbidities that increase the severity and mortality of COVID-19. However, how SARS-CoV-2 alters the progression of chronic diseases remain unclear. Methods: We used adenovirus to deliver h-ACE2 to lung to enable SARS-CoV-2 infection in mice. SARS-CoV-2's impacts on pathogenesis of chronic diseases were studied through histopathological, virologic and molecular biology analysis. Results: Pre-existing CVDs resulted in viral invasion, ROS elevation and activation of apoptosis pathways contribute myocardial injury during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Viral infection increased fasting blood glucose and reduced insulin response in DM model. Bone mineral density decreased shortly after infection, which associated with impaired PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Conclusion: We established mouse models mimicked the complex pathological symptoms of COVID-19 patients with chronic diseases. Pre-existing diseases could impair the inflammatory responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection, which further aggravated the pre-existing diseases. This work provided valuable information to better understand the interplay between the primary diseases and SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Diabetes Complications/physiopathology , Animals , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus , Disease Models, Animal , Male , Mice , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Infect Dis ; 223(8): 1313-1321, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091239

ABSTRACT

Domestic cats, an important companion animal, can be infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). This has aroused concern regarding the ability of domestic cats to spread the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019. We systematically demonstrated the pathogenesis and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in cats. Serial passaging of the virus between cats dramatically attenuated the viral transmissibility, likely owing to variations of the amino acids in the receptor-binding domain sites of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 between humans and cats. These findings provide insight into the transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in cats and information for protecting the health of humans and cats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Amino Acids/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Cats , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Male , Vero Cells
16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(3): 377-383, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041493

ABSTRACT

Disasters such as an earthquake, a flood, and an epidemic usually lead to large numbers of casualties accompanied by disruption of the functioning of local medical institutions. A rapid response of medical assistance and support is required. Mobile hospitals have been deployed by national and international organizations at disaster situations in the past decades, which play an important role in saving casualties and alleviating the shortage of medical resources. In this paper, we briefly introduce the types and characteristics of mobile hospitals used by medical teams in disaster rescue, including the aspects of structural form, organizational form, and mobile transportation. We also review the practices of mobile hospitals in disaster response and summarize the problems and needs of mobile hospitals in disaster rescue. Finally, we propose the development direction of mobile hospitals, especially on the development of intelligence, rapid deployment capabilities, and modularization, which provide suggestions for further research and development of mobile hospitals in the future.


Subject(s)
Civil Defense/instrumentation , Disasters , Mobile Health Units/trends , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/trends , Humans
17.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 3(4): 316-318, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1001795

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to investigate the sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 to different temperatures, to provide basic data and a scientific basis for the control of COVID-19 epidemic. The virus was dispersed in 1 mL basal DMEM medium at a final concentration of 103.2 TCID50/mL and then incubated at 4, 22, 30, 35, 37, 38, 39 and 40°C for up to 5 days. The infectivity of residual virus was titrated using the Vero E6 cell line. The results showed that the virus remained viable for 5 days at 4°C, and for 1 day only at 22 and 30°C. We found that the infectivity of the virus was completely lost after less than 12 hours at 37, 38 and 39°C, while at 40°C, the inactivation time of the virus was rapidly reduced to 6 hours. We show that SARS-CoV-2 is sensitive to heat, is more stable at lower temperatures than higher temperature, remains viable for longer at lower temperatures, and loses viability rapidly at higher temperatures.

18.
Cell Res ; 30(12): 1078-1087, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912896

ABSTRACT

Silent hypoxia has emerged as a unique feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, we show that mucins are accumulated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COVID-19 patients and are upregulated in the lungs of severe respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected mice and macaques. We find that induction of either interferon (IFN)-ß or IFN-γ upon SARS-CoV-2 infection results in activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling through an IDO-Kyn-dependent pathway, leading to transcriptional upregulation of the expression of mucins, both the secreted and membrane-bound, in alveolar epithelial cells. Consequently, accumulated alveolar mucus affects the blood-gas barrier, thus inducing hypoxia and diminishing lung capacity, which can be reversed by blocking AhR activity. These findings potentially explain the silent hypoxia formation in COVID-19 patients, and suggest a possible intervention strategy by targeting the AhR pathway.


Subject(s)
Interferons/metabolism , Mucus/metabolism , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Hypoxia , Interferon-beta/pharmacology , Interferon-gamma/pharmacology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Macaca , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Mice, Transgenic , Mucins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Up-Regulation/drug effects
19.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 183: 114302, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893616

ABSTRACT

Baicalein is the main active compound of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal herb with multiple pharmacological activities, including the broad anti-virus effects. In this paper, the preclinical study of baicalein on the treatment of COVID-19 was performed. Results showed that baicalein inhibited cell damage induced by SARS-CoV-2 and improved the morphology of Vero E6 cells at a concentration of 0.1 µM and above. The effective concentration could be reached after oral administration of 200 mg/kg crystal form ß of baicalein in rats. Furthermore, baicalein significantly inhibited the body weight loss, the replication of the virus, and relieved the lesions of lung tissue in hACE2 transgenic mice infected with SARS-CoV-2. In LPS-induced acute lung injury of mice, baicalein improved the respiratory function, inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung, and decreased the levels of IL-1ß and TNF-α in serum. In conclusion, oral administration of crystal form ß of baicalein could reach its effective concentration against SARS-CoV-2. Baicalein could inhibit SARS-CoV-2-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, baicalein might be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Flavanones/pharmacokinetics , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Transgenic , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Treatment Outcome , Vero Cells
20.
Animal Model Exp Med ; 3(1): 93-97, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-847791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, an outbreak of the Corona Virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan, China, has become a public health emergency of international concern. The high fatality of aged cases caused by SARS-CoV-2 was a need to explore the possible age-related phenomena with non-human primate models. METHODS: Three 3-5 years old and two 15 years old rhesus macaques were intratracheally infected with SARS-CoV-2, and then analyzed by clinical signs, viral replication, chest X-ray, histopathological changes and immune response. RESULTS: Viral replication of nasopharyngeal swabs, anal swabs and lung in old monkeys was more active than that in young monkeys for 14 days after SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Monkeys developed typical interstitial pneumonia characterized by thickened alveolar septum accompanied with inflammation and edema, notably, old monkeys exhibited diffuse severe interstitial pneumonia. Viral antigens were detected mainly in alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 caused more severe interstitial pneumonia in old monkeys than that in young monkeys. Rhesus macaque models infected with SARS-CoV-2 provided insight into the pathogenic mechanism and facilitated the development of vaccines and therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 infection.

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