Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 60
Filter
2.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2184713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Singapore offered the BNT162b2 vaccine (tozinameran; Pfizer-BioNTech) to adolescents aged 12-17 years in May 18, 2021, and extended booster vaccines to this group in Jan 21, 2022. Literature on the effectiveness of primary series and booster vaccination among adolescents is scarce outside of Europe and North America. We aimed to determine primary series and booster vaccine effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalisation among adolescents in Singapore. METHODS: For this national cohort study, we assessed the incidence of confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalisation among adolescents aged 12-17 years vaccinated with BNT162b2 in Singapore from Sept 1 to Dec 15, 2021, during the delta (B.1.617.2) variant wave, and from Jan 21 to April 28, 2022, during the omicron (B.1.1.529) variant wave. Data were collected from official databases maintained by the Ministry of Health of Singapore. Individuals were classified as partly vaccinated (those who had received one dose and those who had received the second dose no more than 7 days previously), fully vaccinated (8 days after receiving a second dose), or boosted (8 days after receiving a third dose) and compared with unvaccinated individuals. FINDINGS: 249 763 individuals aged 12-17 years were included in the study, contributing over 56·2 million person-days of observation. Compared with unvaccinated individuals, two vaccine doses achieved vaccine effectiveness of 66% (95% CI 63-69) against infection with the delta variant and 25% (21-29) against infection with the omicron variant, and 83% (74-89) against delta variant-associated hospitalisation and 75% (56-86) against omicron variant-associated hospitalisation. Booster vaccination with a third dose achieved vaccine effectiveness of 56% (53-58) against infection with the omicron variant and 94% (86-97) against omicron-associated hospitalisation, compared with unvaccinated adolescents. Vaccine effectiveness against infection for both variants after two doses waned over time, whereas vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation for both variants remained stable; both were increased after three doses. INTERPRETATION: Among adolescents aged 12-17 years, vaccine effectiveness against confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection after two doses of BNT162b2 decreased over time and increased after a third dose. Boosted adolescents were also the most protected from hospitalisation compared with fully vaccinated, partly vaccinated, and unvaccinated adolescents. Therefore, the booster dose of BNT162b2 can help to reduce the burden on the health-care system and individual morbidity during an omicron wave. FUNDING: None.

4.
Front Immunol ; 13: 950666, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113954

ABSTRACT

The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to SARS-CoV-2 clades and variants with differing levels of symptoms and severity. To this end, we aim to systematically elucidate the changes in the pathogenesis as SARS-CoV-2 evolved from ancestral to the recent Omicron VOC, on their mechanisms (e.g. cytokine storm) resulting in tissue damage, using the established K18-hACE2 murine model. We reported that among the SARS-CoV-2 viruses tested, infection profiles were initially similar between viruses from early clades but started to differ greatly starting from VOC Delta, where the trend continues in Omicron. VOCs Delta and Omicron both accumulated a significant number of mutations, and when compared to VOCs Alpha, Beta, and earlier predecessors, showed reduced neurotropism and less apparent gene expression in cytokine storm associated pathways. They were shown to leverage on other pathways to cause tissue damage (or lack of in the case of Omicron). Our study highlighted the importance of elucidating the response profiles of individual SARS-CoV-2 iterations, as their propensity of severe infection via pathways like cytokine storm changes as more variant evolves. This will then affect the overall threat assessment of each variant as well as the use of immunomodulatory treatments as management of severe infections of each variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Mice , COVID-19/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Lung/pathology , Pandemics
5.
J Med Virol ; : e28258, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085072

ABSTRACT

Waning antibody levels against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the emergence of variants of concern highlight the need for booster vaccinations. This is particularly important for the elderly population, who are at a higher risk of developing severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease. While studies have shown increased antibody responses following booster vaccination, understanding the changes in T and B cell compartments induced by a third vaccine dose remains limited. We analyzed the humoral and cellular responses in subjects who received either a homologous messenger RNA(mRNA) booster vaccine (BNT162b2 + BNT162b2 + BNT162b2; ''BBB") or a heterologous mRNA booster vaccine (BNT162b2 + BNT162b2 + mRNA-1273; ''BBM") at Day 0 (prebooster), Day 7, and Day 28 (postbooster). Compared with BBB, elderly individuals (≥60 years old) who received the BBM vaccination regimen display higher levels of neutralizing antibodies against the Wuhan and Delta strains along with a higher boost in immunoglobulin G memory B cells, particularly against the Omicron variant. Circulating T helper type 1(Th1), Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper responses were also increased in elderly individuals given the BBM regimen. While mRNA vaccines increase antibody, T cell, and B cell responses against SARS-CoV-2 1 month after receiving the third dose booster, the efficacy of the booster vaccine strategies may vary depending on age group and regimen combination.

6.
Cell Rep Med ; 3(11): 100793, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061977

ABSTRACT

Unlike mRNA vaccines based only on the spike protein, inactivated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines should induce a diversified T cell response recognizing distinct structural proteins. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells in healthy individuals following vaccination with inactivated SARS-CoV-2 or mRNA vaccines. Relative to spike mRNA vaccination, inactivated vaccines elicit a lower magnitude of spike-specific T cells, but the combination of membrane, nucleoprotein, and spike-specific T cell response is quantitatively comparable with the sole spike T cell response induced by mRNA vaccine, and they efficiently tolerate the mutations characterizing the Omicron lineage. However, this multi-protein-specific T cell response is not mediated by a coordinated CD4 and CD8 T cell expansion but by selective priming of CD4 T cells. These findings can help in understanding the role of CD4 and CD8 T cells in the efficacy of the different vaccines to control severe COVID-19 after Omicron infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines , Viral Vaccines/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , COVID-19/prevention & control
7.
Nat Microbiol ; 7(11): 1756-1761, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050395

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant (B.1.1.529 lineage) escapes antibodies that neutralize the ancestral virus. We tested human serum panels from participants with differing infection and vaccination status using a multiplex surrogate virus neutralization assay targeting 20 sarbecoviruses. We found that bat and pangolin sarbecoviruses showed significantly less neutralization escape than the Omicron variant. We propose that SARS-CoV-2 variants have emerged under immune selection pressure and are evolving differently from animal sarbecoviruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins , Antibodies, Viral , Membrane Glycoproteins
8.
The Lancet. Infectious diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2045202

ABSTRACT

Background Singapore offered the BNT162b2 vaccine (tozinameran;Pfizer-BioNTech) to adolescents aged 12–17 years in May 18, 2021, and extended booster vaccines to this group in Jan 21, 2022. Literature on the effectiveness of primary series and booster vaccination among adolescents is scarce outside of Europe and North America. We aimed to determine primary series and booster vaccine effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalisation among adolescents in Singapore. Methods For this national cohort study, we assessed the incidence of confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalisation among adolescents aged 12–17 years vaccinated with BNT162b2 in Singapore from Sept 1 to Dec 15, 2021, during the delta (B.1.617.2) variant wave, and from Jan 21 to April 28, 2022, during the omicron (B.1.1.529) variant wave. Data were collected from official databases maintained by the Ministry of Health of Singapore. Individuals were classified as partly vaccinated (those who had received one dose and those who had received the second dose no more than 7 days previously), fully vaccinated (8 days after receiving a second dose), or boosted (8 days after receiving a third dose) and compared with unvaccinated individuals. Findings 249 763 individuals aged 12–17 years were included in the study, contributing over 56·2 million person-days of observation. Compared with unvaccinated individuals, two vaccine doses achieved vaccine effectiveness of 66% (95% CI 63–69) against infection with the delta variant and 25% (21–29) against infection with the omicron variant, and 83% (74–89) against delta variant-associated hospitalisation and 75% (56–86) against omicron variant-associated hospitalisation. Booster vaccination with a third dose achieved vaccine effectiveness of 56% (53–58) against infection with the omicron variant and 94% (86–97) against omicron-associated hospitalisation, compared with unvaccinated adolescents. Vaccine effectiveness against infection for both variants after two doses waned over time, whereas vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation for both variants remained stable;both were increased after three doses. Interpretation Among adolescents aged 12–17 years, vaccine effectiveness against confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection after two doses of BNT162b2 decreased over time and increased after a third dose. Boosted adolescents were also the most protected from hospitalisation compared with fully vaccinated, partly vaccinated, and unvaccinated adolescents. Therefore, the booster dose of BNT162b2 can help to reduce the burden on the health-care system and individual morbidity during an omicron wave. Funding None.

10.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 2022 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996083

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We compared the vaccine effectiveness over time of the primary series and booster against infection and severe disease with the Delta, Omicron BA.1, and BA.2 variants in Singapore, an Asian setting with high vaccination coverage. METHODS: We conducted a test-negative case-control study on all adult residents in Singapore who underwent PCR testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in acute hospitals. Individuals with a negative PCR from 1 September, 2021, to 30 November, 2021, and 1 December, 2021, to 25 April, 2022, served as controls for the Delta and Omicron variants respectively, and PCR-positive individuals within these two time periods served as cases. Associations between vaccination status and severe SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe disease with the Delta or Omicron variants were measured using Poisson regressions. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated by taking 1 minus risk ratio. RESULTS: There were 68 114 individuals comprising 58 495 controls and 9619 cases for the Delta period, of whom 53 093 completed the primary series and 9161 were boosted. For the Omicron period, 104 601 individuals comprising 80 428 controls, 8643 BA.1 cases, and 15 530 BA.2 cases were included, of whom 29 183 and 71 513 were vaccinated with the primary series and boosted, respectively. The primary series provided greater protection against infection with Delta (45%, 95% CI 40-50%) than against infection with Omicron (21%, 95% CI 7-34% for BA.1; 18%, 95% CI 6-29% for BA.2) at <2 months from vaccination. Vaccine effectiveness of the booster was similar against infection with BA.1 (44%, 95% CI 38-50%) and BA.2 (40%, 95% CI 35-40%). Protection against severe disease by the booster for BA.1 (83%, 95% CI 76-88%) and BA.2 (78%, 95% CI 73-82%) was comparable to that by the primary series for Delta (80%, 95% CI 73-85%). CONCLUSION: Our findings support the use of a booster dose to reduce the risk of severe disease and mitigate the impact on the healthcare system in an Omicron-predominant epidemic.

12.
Trials ; 23(1): 498, 2022 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over 2021, COVID-19 vaccination programs worldwide focused on raising population immunity through the primary COVID-19 vaccine series. In Singapore, two mRNA vaccines (BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273) and the inactivated vaccine CoronaVac are currently authorized under the National Vaccination Programme for use as the primary vaccination series. More than 90% of the Singapore population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine as of December 2021. With the demonstration that vaccine effectiveness wanes in the months after vaccination, and the emergence of Omicron which evades host immunity from prior infection and/or vaccination, attention in many countries has shifted to how best to maintain immunity through booster vaccinations. METHODS: The objectives of this phase 3, randomized, subject-blinded, controlled clinical trial are to assess the safety and immunogenicity of heterologous boost COVID-19 vaccine regimens (intervention groups 1-4) compared with a homologous boost regimen (control arm) in up to 600 adult volunteers. As non-mRNA vaccine candidates may enter the study at different time points depending on vaccine availability and local regulatory approval, participants will be randomized at equal probability to the available intervention arms at the time of randomization. Eligible participants will have received two doses of a homologous mRNA vaccine series with BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 at least 6 months prior to enrolment. Participants will be excluded if they have a history of confirmed SARS or SARS-CoV-2 infection, are immunocompromised, or are pregnant. Participants will be monitored for adverse events and serious adverse events by physical examinations, laboratory tests and self-reporting. Blood samples will be collected at serial time points [pre-vaccination/screening (day - 14 to day 0), day 7, day 28, day 180, day 360 post-vaccination] for assessment of antibody and cellular immune parameters. Primary endpoint is the level of anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike immunoglobulins at day 28 post-booster and will be measured against wildtype SARS-CoV-2 and variants of concern. Comprehensive immune profiling of the humoral and cellular immune response to vaccination will be performed. DISCUSSION: This study will provide necessary data to understand the quantity, quality, and persistence of the immune response to a homologous and heterologous third booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines. This is an important step in developing COVID-19 vaccination programs beyond the primary series. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05142319 . Registered on 2 Dec 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic , mRNA Vaccines
13.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Waning antibody levels post-vaccination and the emergence of variants of concern (VOCs) capable of evading protective immunity has raised the need for booster vaccinations. However, which combination of COVID-19 vaccines offers the strongest immune response against Omicron variant is unknown. METHODS: This randomized, subject-blinded, controlled trial assessed the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of different COVID-19 vaccine booster combinations. 100 BNT162b2-vaccinated individuals were enrolled and randomized 1: 1 to either homologous (BNT162b2 + BNT162b2 + BNT162b2; 'BBB') or heterologous mRNA booster vaccine (BNT162b2 + BNT162b2 + mRNA-1273; 'BBM'). Primary endpoint was the level of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 wild-type and VOCs at Day 28. RESULTS: 51 participants were allocated to BBB and 49 to BBM; 50 and 48 respectively were analyzed for safety and immunogenicity outcomes. At Day 28 post-boost, mean SARS-CoV-2 spike antibody titers were lower with BBB (22,382  IU/mL 95% CI, 18,210 to 27,517) vs BBM (29,751  IU/mL 95% CI, 25,281 to 35,011, p = 0.034) as was the median level of neutralizing antibodies: BBB 99.0% (IQR 97.9 to 99.3%) vs BBM 99.3% (IQR 98.8 to 99.5%, p = 0.021). On sub-group analysis, significant differences in mean spike antibody titer and live Omicron neutralization titer was only observed in older adults. Median surrogate neutralizing antibody level against all VOCs was also significantly higher with BBM in older adults, and against Omicron was BBB 72.8% (IQR 54.0 to 84.7%) vs BBM 84.3% (IQR 78.1 to 88.7%, p = 0.0073). Both vaccines were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Heterologous mRNA-1273 booster vaccination induced a stronger neutralizing response against the Omicron variant in older individuals compared with homologous BNT123b2.

14.
J Exp Med ; 219(8)2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901005

ABSTRACT

Recessive or dominant inborn errors of type I interferon (IFN) immunity can underlie critical COVID-19 pneumonia in unvaccinated adults. The risk of COVID-19 pneumonia in unvaccinated children, which is much lower than in unvaccinated adults, remains unexplained. In an international cohort of 112 children (<16 yr old) hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia, we report 12 children (10.7%) aged 1.5-13 yr with critical (7 children), severe (3), and moderate (2) pneumonia and 4 of the 15 known clinically recessive and biochemically complete inborn errors of type I IFN immunity: X-linked recessive TLR7 deficiency (7 children) and autosomal recessive IFNAR1 (1), STAT2 (1), or TYK2 (3) deficiencies. Fibroblasts deficient for IFNAR1, STAT2, or TYK2 are highly vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2. These 15 deficiencies were not found in 1,224 children and adults with benign SARS-CoV-2 infection without pneumonia (P = 1.2 × 10-11) and with overlapping age, sex, consanguinity, and ethnicity characteristics. Recessive complete deficiencies of type I IFN immunity may underlie ∼10% of hospitalizations for COVID-19 pneumonia in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon Type I , Pneumonia , Adult , COVID-19/genetics , Child , Humans , Inheritance Patterns , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Am J Hematol ; 97(7): 915-923, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1888602

ABSTRACT

Sustained hypercoagulability and endotheliopathy are present in convalescent COVID-19 patients for up to 4 months from recovery. The hemostatic, endothelial, and inflammatory profiles of 39 recovered COVID-19 patients were evaluated up to 16 months after recovery from COVID-19. These values were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers (n = 124). 39 patients (71.8% males, median age 43 years) were reviewed at a mean of 12.7 ± 3.6 months following recovery. One patient without cardiovascular risk factors had post COVID-19 acute ischaemic limb. Elevated D-dimer and Factor VIII levels above normal ranges were noted in 17.9% (7/39) and 48.7% (19/39) of patients respectively, with a higher median D-dimer 0.34 FEU µg/mL (IQR 0.28, 0.46) (p < .001) and Factor VIII 150% (IQR 171, 203) (p = .004), versus controls. Thrombin generation (Thromboscreen) showed a higher median endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) of 1352 nM*min (IQR 1152, 1490) (p = .002) and a higher median peak height of 221.4 nM (IQR 170.2, 280.4) (p = 0.01) and delayed lag time 2.4 min (1.42-2.97) (p = 0.0002) versus controls. Raised vWF:Ag and ICAM-1 levels were observed in 17.9% (7/39) and 7.7% (3/39) of patients respectively, with a higher median VWF:Ag 117% (IQR 86, 154) (p = 0.02) and ICAM-1 54.1 ng/mL (IQR 43.8, 64.1) (p = .004) than controls. IL-6 was noted to be raised in 35.9% (14/39) of patients, with a higher median IL-6 of 1.5 pg/mL (IQR 0.6, 3.0) (p = 0.004) versus controls. Subgroup analysis stratifying patients by COVID-19 severity and COVID-19 vaccination preceding SARS-CoV-2 infection did not show statistically significant differences. Hypercoagulability, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation are still detectable in some patients approximately 1 year after recovery from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombophilia , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Factor VIII , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombin , Thrombophilia/etiology , von Willebrand Factor
16.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(8): 1442-1445, 2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886388

ABSTRACT

Compared with individuals vaccinated with Pfizer-BioNTech/Comirnaty, recipients of Sinovac-CoronaVac and Sinopharm were 2.37 (95% CI, 2.29-2.46) and 1.62 (95% CI, 1.43-1.85) times more likely to be infected with coronavirus disease 19, respectively, while individuals vaccinated with Moderna were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.25-0.70) times less likely to develop severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , RNA, Messenger , Singapore/epidemiology , Vaccines, Inactivated
18.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(1): e874-e877, 2022 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730659

ABSTRACT

In this cross-sectional study, we studied performance of the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infections Consortium mortality and deterioration scores in a cohort of 410 hospitalized patients (51.2% fully vaccinated). area under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.778 and 0.764, respectively, comparable to originally published validation cohorts. Subgroup analysis showed equally good performance in vaccinated and partially or unvaccinated patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Vaccination
19.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702780

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: he impact of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) on disease severity is unclear. In this retrospective study, we compared outcomes of patients infected with B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and B.1.617.2 with those with wild-type strains from early 2020. METHODS: National surveillance data from 1-January-2021 to 22-May-2021 were obtained from the Ministry of Health, and outcomes in relation to VOC were explored. Detailed patient level data from all patients with VOC infection admitted to our center between 20-December-2020 and 12-May-2021 were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were compared with a cohort of 846 patients admitted from January-April 2020. RESULTS: 829 patients in Singapore in the study period were infected with these 3 VOCs. After adjusting for age and sex, B.1.617.2 was associated with higher odds of oxygen requirement, ICU admission, or death (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.90, [95% CI 1.43-30.78]). 157 of these patients were admitted to our center. After adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, and vaccination, aOR for pneumonia with B.1.617.2 was 1.88 [95% CI 0.95-3.76]) compared with wild-type. These differences were not seen with B.1.1.7 and B.1.351. Vaccination status was associated with decreased severity. B.1.617.2 was associated with significantly lower PCR Ct values and longer duration of Ct value ≤30 (median duration 18 days for B.1.617.2, 13 days for wild-type). CONCLUSIONS: There was a signal toward increased severity associated with B.1.617.2. The association of B.1.617.2 with lower Ct value and longer viral shedding provides a potential mechanism for increased transmissibility. These findings provide an impetus for the rapid implementation of vaccination programs.

20.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 28(6): 884.e1-884.e3, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670361

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Predictive scores are important tools for the triage of patients with coronavirus disease 2019. The PRIORITY score is advantageous because it does not require laboratory and radiologic information. However, the original development and validation cohorts studied only unvaccinated patients in early 2020. We aimed to externally validate the PRIORITY score in a cohort of patients with the novel delta and omicron variants of coronavirus disease 2019 and mixed vaccination status. METHODS: A total of 410 patients were included in a cross-sectional sampling of all patients admitted to the National Centre of Infectious Diseases on October 27, 2021. A further 102 and 136 patients with vaccine-breakthrough Delta and Omicron variant infection from April to August and December 2021, respectively, were also included. Variables at the time of admission were collected retrospectively from medical records and used to calculate the probability of deterioration using the PRIORITY model. RESULTS: Of the total 648 included patients, 447 (69.0%) were vaccinated. The mean age was 61.6 years (standard deviation ± 19.0 years), and 268 patients (41.4%) were female. A total of 112 patients (17.3%) met the primary outcome of developing critical illness or mortality. The performance of the score in this cohort was comparable with the original cohorts, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for all patients of 0.794 (95% CI, 0.752-0.835; p < 0.001), regression coefficient of 1.069, and intercept of 0.04. Subgroup analysis of unvaccinated and vaccinated patients showed that performance was superior in vaccinated individuals, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.684 (95% CI, 0.608-0.760; p < 0.0001) and 0.831 (95% CI, 0.772-0.891; p < 0.0001), respectively. DISCUSSION: Our data support the continued use of the PRIORITY score in this era of novel variants and increased vaccination uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL