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1.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(1)2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632905

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Understanding factors influencing inappropriate antibiotic use can guide the design of interventions to improve antibiotic practices and reduce antimicrobial resistance (AMR). METHODS: A nationally representative cross-sectional survey (N = 2004) was conducted between November 2020 and January 2021. Knowledge of antibiotic use and AMR using the World Health Organization's Multi-Country AMR Survey questionnaire, and antibiotic practices were examined. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic use and examine effect measure modifications. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounding, poor knowledge of antibiotic use was associated with a 3x increased odds of inappropriate antibiotic use in adults aged ≥50 years (aOR 3.11, 95% CI [2.24-4.32]), 5× increased odds in those aged 35-49 years (aOR 4.88, 95% CI [3.32-7.16]), and 7× increased odds in those aged 21-34 years (aOR 6.58, 95% CI [4.19-10.33]). While there was no statistically significant association in adults aged ≥50 years, poor knowledge of AMR increased the odds of inappropriate antibiotic use by 4 times in adults aged 35-49 years (aOR 3.73, 95% CI [1.53-9.11]) and 5 times in those aged 21-34 years (aOR 4.90, 95% CI [1.84-13.02]). CONCLUSIONS: Targeted educational interventions for specific age groups are needed in conjunction with empowering the public with knowledge of antibiotic use and AMR.

2.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 2021 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604269

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Highly effective vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been developed but variants of concerns are worrisome, especially B.1.617.2 (Delta) which has rapidly spread across the world. We aim to study if vaccination alters virological and serological kinetics in breakthrough infections. METHODS: We conducted a multi-centre retrospective cohort study of patients in Singapore who had received a licensed mRNA vaccine and been admitted to hospital with B.1.617.2 SARS-CoV-2 infection. We compared clinical features, virological and serological kinetics (anti-nucleocapsid, anti-spike and surrogate virus neutralization titres) between fully vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. RESULTS: Out of 218 individuals with B.1.617.2 infection, 84 received a mRNA vaccine of which 71 were fully vaccinated, 130 were unvaccinated and 4 received a non-mRNA. Despite significantly older age in the vaccine-breakthrough group, only 2.8% (2/71) developed severe COVID-19 requiring oxygen supplementation compared to 53.1% (69/130) in the unvaccinated group (p<0.001). Odds of severe COVID-19 following vaccination were significantly lower (adjusted odds ratio 0.07 95%CI: 0.015-0.335, p=0.001). PCR cycle threshold values were similar between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups at diagnosis, but viral loads decreased faster in vaccinated individuals. Early, robust boosting of anti-spike protein antibodies was observed in vaccinated patients, however, these titers were significantly lower against B.1.617.2 as compared with wildtype vaccine strain. CONCLUSION: The mRNA vaccines are highly effective at preventing symptomatic and severe COVID-19 associated with B.1.617.2 infection. Vaccination is associated with faster decline in viral RNA load and a robust serological response. Vaccination remains a key strategy for control of COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 710217, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555700

ABSTRACT

Severe SARS-CoV-2 infection can trigger uncontrolled innate and adaptive immune responses, which are commonly associated with lymphopenia and increased neutrophil counts. However, whether the immune abnormalities observed in mild to severely infected patients persist into convalescence remains unclear. Herein, comparisons were drawn between the immune responses of COVID-19 infected and convalescent adults. Strikingly, survivors of severe COVID-19 had decreased proportions of NKT and Vδ2 T cells, and increased proportions of low-density neutrophils, IgA+/CD86+/CD123+ non-classical monocytes and hyperactivated HLADR+CD38+ CD8+ T cells, and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A, long after virus clearance. Our study suggests potential immune correlates of "long COVID-19", and defines key cells and cytokines that delineate true and quasi-convalescent states.

5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(9): e2932-e2942, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Key knowledge gaps remain in the understanding of viral dynamics and immune response of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: We evaluated these characteristics and established their association with clinical severity in a prospective observational cohort study of 100 patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (mean age, 46 years; 56% male; 38% with comorbidities). Respiratory samples (n = 74) were collected for viral culture, serum samples for measurement of IgM/IgG levels (n = 30), and plasma samples for levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (n = 81). Disease severity was correlated with results from viral culture, serologic testing, and immune markers. RESULTS: Fifty-seven (57%) patients developed viral pneumonia, of whom 20 (20%) required supplemental oxygen, including 12 (12%) with invasive mechanical ventilation. Viral culture from respiratory samples was positive for 19 of 74 patients (26%). No virus was isolated when the PCR cycle threshold (Ct) value was >30 or >14 days after symptom onset. Seroconversion occurred at a median (IQR) of 12.5 (9-18) days for IgM and 15.0 (12-20) days for IgG; 54/62 patients (87.1%) sampled at day 14 or later seroconverted. Severe infections were associated with earlier seroconversion and higher peak IgM and IgG levels. Levels of IP-10, HGF, IL-6, MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-12p70, IL-18, VEGF-A, PDGF-BB, and IL-1RA significantly correlated with disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We found virus viability was associated with lower PCR Ct value in early illness. A stronger antibody response was associated with disease severity. The overactive proinflammatory immune signatures offer targets for host-directed immunotherapy, which should be evaluated in randomized controlled trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia, Viral , Antibodies, Viral , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroconversion
6.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 50(9): 686-694, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464249

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 is associated with a high mortality rate, though outcomes of the different lung compliance phenotypes are unclear. We aimed to measure lung compliance and examine other factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients with ARDS. METHODS: Adult patients with COVID-19 ARDS who required invasive mechanical ventilation at 8 hospitals in Singapore were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with both mortality and differences between high (<40mL/cm H2O) and low (<40mL/cm H2O) compliance were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients with COVID-19 who required invasive mechanical ventilation were analysed; 15 (14.7%) did not survive. Non-survivors were older (median 70 years, interquartile range [IQR] 67-75 versus median 61 years, IQR 52-66; P<0.01), and required a longer duration of ventilation (26 days, IQR 12-27 vs 8 days, IQR 5-15; P<0.01) and intensive care unit support (26 days, IQR 11-30 vs 11.5 days, IQR 7-17.3; P=0.01), with a higher incidence of acute kidney injury (15 patients [100%] vs 40 patients [46%]; P<0.01). There were 67 patients who had lung compliance data; 24 (35.8%) were classified as having high compliance and 43 (64.2%) as having low compliance. Mortality was higher in patients with high compliance (33.3% vs 11.6%; P=0.03), and was associated with a drop in compliance at day 7 (-9.3mL/cm H2O (IQR -4.5 to -15.4) vs 0.2mL/cm H2O (4.7 to -5.2) P=0.04). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 ARDS patients with higher compliance on the day of intubation and a longitudinal decrease over time had a higher risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Lung Compliance , Phenotype , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19713, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454811

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) presents with non-specific clinical features. This may result in misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, and lead to further transmission in the community. We aimed to derive early predictors to differentiate COVID-19 from influenza and dengue. The study comprised 126 patients with COVID-19, 171 with influenza and 180 with dengue, who presented within 5 days of symptom onset. All cases were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests. We used logistic regression models to identify demographics, clinical characteristics and laboratory markers in classifying COVID-19 versus influenza, and COVID-19 versus dengue. The performance of each model was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Shortness of breath was the strongest predictor in the models for differentiating between COVID-19 and influenza, followed by diarrhoea. Higher lymphocyte count was predictive of COVID-19 versus influenza and versus dengue. In the model for differentiating between COVID-19 and dengue, patients with cough and higher platelet count were at increased odds of COVID-19, while headache, joint pain, skin rash and vomiting/nausea were indicative of dengue. The cross-validated area under the ROC curve for all four models was above 0.85. Clinical features and simple laboratory markers for differentiating COVID-19 from influenza and dengue are identified in this study which can be used by primary care physicians in resource limited settings to determine if further investigations or referrals would be required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dengue/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Adult , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Dengue/complications , Dengue/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Diarrhea/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/metabolism , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vomiting/etiology , Young Adult
8.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439746

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 patients demonstrate hypercoagulability, necessitating thromboprophylaxis. However, less is known about the haemostatic profile in mild COVID-19 patients. We performed an age and gender-matched prospective study of 10 severe and 10 mild COVID-19 patients. Comprehensive coagulation profiling together with Thromboelastography and Clot Waveform Analysis were performed. FBC, PT, APTT, D-dimer, fibrinogen and CWA were repeated every 3 days for both groups and repeat TEG was performed for severe patients up till 15 days. On recruitment, severe patients had markers reflecting hypercoagulability including raised median D-dimer 1.0 µg/mL (IQR 0.6, 1.4) (p = 0.0004), fibrinogen 5.6 g/L (IQR 4.9, 6.6) (p = 0.002), Factor VIII 206% (IQR 171, 203) and vWF levels 265.5% (IQR 206, 321). Mild patients had normal values of PT, aPTT, fibrinogen and D-dimer, and slightly elevated median Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. Repeated 3-day assessments for both groups showed declining trends in D-dimer and Fibrinogen. CWA of severe COVID-19 group demonstrated hypercoagulability with an elevated median values of aPTT delta change 78.8% (IQR 69.8, 85.2) (p = 0.001), aPTT clot velocity (min1) 7.8%/s (IQR 6.7, 8.3) (p = 0.001), PT delta change 22.4% (IQR 19.4, 29.5) (p = 0.004), PT min1 7.1%/s (IQR 6.3, 9.0) (p = 0.02), PT clot acceleration (min 2) 3.6%/s2 (IQR 3.2, 4.5) (p = 0.02) and PT clot deceleration (max2) 2.9%/s2 (IQR 2.5, 3.5) (p = 0.02). TEG of severe patients reflected hypercoagulability with significant increases in the median values of CFF MA 34.6 mm (IQR 27.4,38.6) (p = 0.003), CRT Angle 78.9° (IQR 78.3, 80.0) (p = 0.0006), CRT A10 67.6 mm (IQR 65.8, 69.6) (p = 0.007) and CFF A10 32.0 mm (IQR 26.8, 34.0) (p = 0.003). Mild COVID-19 patients had absent hypercoagulability in both CWA and TEG. 2 severe patients developed thromboembolic events while none occurred in the mild COVID-19 group. Mild COVID-19 patients show absent parameters of hypercoagulability in global haemostatic tests while those with severe COVID-19 demonstrated parameters associated with hypercoagulability on the global haemostatic tests together with raised D-Dimer, fibrinogen, Factor VIII and vWF levels.

9.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: he impact of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) on disease severity is unclear. In this retrospective study, we compared outcomes of patients infected with B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and B.1.617.2 with those with wild-type strains from early 2020. METHODS: National surveillance data from 1-January-2021 to 22-May-2021 were obtained from the Ministry of Health, and outcomes in relation to VOC were explored. Detailed patient level data from all patients with VOC infection admitted to our center between 20-December-2020 and 12-May-2021 were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were compared with a cohort of 846 patients admitted from January-April 2020. RESULTS: 829 patients in Singapore in the study period were infected with these 3 VOCs. After adjusting for age and sex, B.1.617.2 was associated with higher odds of oxygen requirement, ICU admission, or death (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.90, [95% CI 1.43-30.78]). 157 of these patients were admitted to our center. After adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, and vaccination, aOR for pneumonia with B.1.617.2 was 1.88 [95% CI 0.95-3.76]) compared with wild-type. These differences were not seen with B.1.1.7 and B.1.351. Vaccination status was associated with decreased severity. B.1.617.2 was associated with significantly lower PCR Ct values and longer duration of Ct value ≤30 (median duration 18 days for B.1.617.2, 13 days for wild-type). CONCLUSIONS: There was a signal toward increased severity associated with B.1.617.2. The association of B.1.617.2 with lower Ct value and longer viral shedding provides a potential mechanism for increased transmissibility. These findings provide an impetus for the rapid implementation of vaccination programs.

11.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(7): ofab278, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317924

ABSTRACT

Background: Remdesivir is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has been shown to shorten time to recovery and improve clinical outcomes in randomized trials. Methods: This was the final day 28 comparative analysis of data from a phase 3, randomized, open-label study comparing 2 remdesivir regimens (5 vs 10 days, combined for this analysis [remdesivir cohort]) and a real-world retrospective longitudinal cohort study of patients receiving standard-of-care treatment (nonremdesivir cohort). Eligible patients, aged ≥18 years, had confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), oxygen saturation ≤94% on room air or required supplemental oxygen, with pulmonary infiltrates. Propensity score matching (up to 1:10 ratio) was used to ensure comparable populations. We assessed day 14 clinical recovery (determined using a 7-point ordinal scale) and day 28 all-cause mortality (coprimary endpoints). Results: A total of 368 (remdesivir) and 1399 (nonremdesivir) patients were included in the matched analysis. The day 14 clinical recovery rate was significantly higher among the remdesivir versus the nonremdesivir cohort (65.2% vs 57.1%; odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.90; P = 0.002). The day 28 mortality rate was significantly lower in the remdesivir cohort versus the nonremdesivir cohort (12.0% vs 16.2%; OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.47-.95; P = .03). Conclusions: Remdesivir was associated with significantly higher rates of day 14 clinical recovery, and lower day 28 mortality, compared with standard-of-care treatment in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. These data, taken together, support the use of remdesivir to improve clinical recovery and decrease mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection.

12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 680188, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311374

ABSTRACT

A significant proportion of COVID-19 patients will progress to critical illness requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. This accentuates the need for a therapy that can reduce the severity of COVID-19. Clinical trials have shown the effectiveness of remdesivir in shortening recovery time and decreasing progression to respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. However, some studies have highlighted its lack of efficacy in patients on high-flow oxygen and mechanical ventilation. This study uncovers some underlying immune response differences between responders and non-responders to remdesivir treatment. Immunological analyses revealed an upregulation of tissue repair factors BDNF, PDGF-BB and PIGF-1, as well as an increase in ratio of Th2-associated cytokine IL-4 to Th1-associated cytokine IFN-γ. Serological profiling of IgG subclasses corroborated this observation, with significantly higher magnitude of increase in Th2-associated IgG2 and IgG4 responses. These findings help to identify the mechanisms of immune regulation accompanying successful remdesivir treatment in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokines/blood , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Becaplermin/blood , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Membrane Proteins/blood , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Treatment Outcome
13.
Respirology ; 26(8): 745-767, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301542

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is ongoing and many drugs have been studied in clinical trials. From a pathophysiological perspective, anti-viral drugs may be more effective in the early stage while immunomodulators may be more effective in severe patients in later stages of infection. While drugs such as lopinavir-ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin have proved to be ineffective in randomized controlled trials, corticosteroids, neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, remdesivir, tocilizumab and baricitinib have been reported to benefit certain groups of patients with COVID-19. In this review, we will present the key clinical evidence and progress in promising COVID-19 therapeutics, as well as summarize the experience and lessons learned from the development of the current therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 674279, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266662

ABSTRACT

An accurate depiction of the convalescent COVID-19 immunome will help delineate the immunological milieu crucial for disease resolution and protection. Using mass cytometry, we characterized the immune architecture in patients recovering from mild COVID-19. We identified a virus-specific immune rheostat composed of an effector T (Teff) cell recall response that is balanced by the enrichment of a highly specialized regulatory T (Treg) cell subset. Both components were reactive against a peptide pool covering the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein. We also observed expansion of IFNγ+ memory CD4+ T cells and virus-specific follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Overall, these findings pinpoint critical immune effector and regulatory mechanisms essential for a potent, yet harmless resolution of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T Follicular Helper Cells/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Young Adult
15.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(6): ofab156, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258788

ABSTRACT

Background: The complications and sequelae of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their effect on long-term health are unclear, and the trajectory of associated immune dysregulation is poorly understood. Methods: We conducted a prospective longitudinal multicenter cohort study at 4 public hospitals in Singapore. Patients with COVID-19 were monitored for a median of 6 months after recovery from acute infection. Clinical symptoms and radiologic data were collected, along with plasma samples for quantification of immune mediators. The relationship between clinical symptoms and immune cytokine profiles was investigated. Results: Two hundred eighty-eight participants were recruited, and follow-up data were available for 183, 175, and 120 participants at days 30, 90, and 180 postsymptom onset, respectively. Symptoms related to COVID-19 were present in 31 (16.9%), 13 (7.4%), and 14 (11.7%) at days 30, 90, and 180. In a multivariable model, age >65 years, non-Chinese ethnicity, and the severity of acute infection were associated with increased likelihood of persistent symptoms. Recovered COVID-19 patients had elevated levels of proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-17A, stem cell factor, IL-12p70, and IL-1ß and pro-angiogenic macrophage inflammatory protein 1ß, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor at day 180 compared with healthy controls. Higher levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB were detected in patients with persistent symptoms, versus symptom-free patients. Conclusions: Approximately 10% of recovered patients had persistent symptoms 6 months after initial infection. Immune cytokine signatures of the recovered patients reflected ongoing chronic inflammation and angiogenesis. Patients with COVID-19 should be monitored closely for emerging long-term health consequences.

17.
Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore ; 49(10):764-778, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1231748

ABSTRACT

As of 27 October 2020, there have been 57,980 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Singapore, with 28 fatalities. To summarise the Singapore experience in managing and containing COVID-19 based on available published data and from relevant sources, a review of literature using research databases such as PubMed and OVID Medline, along with non-peer-reviewed articles and other sources, was conducted with the search terms 'COVID-19' and 'Singapore'. Research conducted in Singapore has provided insight into the clinical manifestations and period of infectivity of COVID-19, demonstrated evidence of pre-symptomatic transmission, linked infection clusters using serological tools, and highlighted aspects of hospital-based environmental contamination. It has also provided guidance for diagnostic testing and has described immune and virologic correlates with disease severity. Evidence of effectiveness of containment measures such as early border control, rigorous contact training, and calibrated social distancing measures have also been demonstrated. Singapore's multipronged strategy has been largely successful at containing COVID-19 and minimising fatalities, but the risk of re-emergence is high.

18.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(6): e14045, 2021 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219070

ABSTRACT

The immune responses and mechanisms limiting symptom progression in asymptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection remain unclear. We comprehensively characterized transcriptomic profiles, cytokine responses, neutralization capacity of antibodies, and cellular immune phenotypes of asymptomatic patients with acute SARS-CoV-2 infection to identify potential protective mechanisms. Compared to symptomatic patients, asymptomatic patients had higher counts of mature neutrophils and lower proportion of CD169+ expressing monocytes in the peripheral blood. Systemic levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were also lower in asymptomatic patients, accompanied by milder pro-inflammatory gene signatures. Mechanistically, a more robust systemic Th2 cell signature with a higher level of virus-specific Th17 cells and a weaker yet sufficient neutralizing antibody profile against SARS-CoV-2 was observed in asymptomatic patients. In addition, asymptomatic COVID-19 patients had higher systemic levels of growth factors that are associated with cellular repair. Together, the data suggest that asymptomatic patients mount less pro-inflammatory and more protective immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 indicative of disease tolerance. Insights from this study highlight key immune pathways that could serve as therapeutic targets to prevent disease progression in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Carrier State/immunology , Biomarkers/metabolism , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Carrier State/pathology , Carrier State/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Monocytes/cytology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Th17 Cells/cytology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Transcriptome , Up-Regulation , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor D/metabolism
20.
EBioMedicine ; 66: 103319, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Host determinants of severe coronavirus disease 2019 include advanced age, comorbidities and male sex. Virologic factors may also be important in determining clinical outcome and transmission rates, but limited patient-level data is available. METHODS: We conducted an observational cohort study at seven public hospitals in Singapore. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and compared between individuals infected with different SARS-CoV-2 clades. Firth's logistic regression was used to examine the association between SARS-CoV-2 clade and development of hypoxia, and quasi-Poisson regression to compare transmission rates. Plasma samples were tested for immune mediator levels and the kinetics of viral replication in cell culture were compared. FINDINGS: 319 patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection had clinical and virologic data available for analysis. 29 (9%) were infected with clade S, 90 (28%) with clade L/V, 96 (30%) with clade G (containing D614G variant), and 104 (33%) with other clades 'O' were assigned to lineage B.6. After adjusting for age and other covariates, infections with clade S (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0·030 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0·0002-0·29)) or clade O (B·6) (aOR 0·26 (95% CI 0·064-0·93)) were associated with lower odds of developing hypoxia requiring supplemental oxygen compared with clade L/V. Patients infected with clade L/V had more pronounced systemic inflammation with higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. No significant difference in the severity of clade G infections was observed (aOR 0·95 (95% CI: 0·35-2·52). Though viral loads were significantly higher, there was no evidence of increased transmissibility of clade G, and replicative fitness in cell culture was similar for all clades. INTERPRETATION: Infection with clades L/V was associated with increased severity and more systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Infection with clade G was not associated with changes in severity, and despite higher viral loads there was no evidence of increased transmissibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/transmission , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/therapy , Hypoxia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Singapore/epidemiology , Viral Load
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