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1.
BMJ : British Medical Journal (Online) ; 368, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1837197

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveTo delineate the clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) who died.DesignRetrospective case series.SettingTongji Hospital in Wuhan, China.ParticipantsAmong a cohort of 799 patients, 113 who died and 161 who recovered with a diagnosis of covid-19 were analysed. Data were collected until 28 February 2020.Main outcome measuresClinical characteristics and laboratory findings were obtained from electronic medical records with data collection forms.ResultsThe median age of deceased patients (68 years) was significantly older than recovered patients (51 years). Male sex was more predominant in deceased patients (83;73%) than in recovered patients (88;55%). Chronic hypertension and other cardiovascular comorbidities were more frequent among deceased patients (54 (48%) and 16 (14%)) than recovered patients (39 (24%) and 7 (4%)). Dyspnoea, chest tightness, and disorder of consciousness were more common in deceased patients (70 (62%), 55 (49%), and 25 (22%)) than in recovered patients (50 (31%), 48 (30%), and 1 (1%)). The median time from disease onset to death in deceased patients was 16 (interquartile range 12.0-20.0) days. Leukocytosis was present in 56 (50%) patients who died and 6 (4%) who recovered, and lymphopenia was present in 103 (91%) and 76 (47%) respectively. Concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, cardiac troponin I, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and D-dimer were markedly higher in deceased patients than in recovered patients. Common complications observed more frequently in deceased patients included acute respiratory distress syndrome (113;100%), type I respiratory failure (18/35;51%), sepsis (113;100%), acute cardiac injury (72/94;77%), heart failure (41/83;49%), alkalosis (14/35;40%), hyperkalaemia (42;37%), acute kidney injury (28;25%), and hypoxic encephalopathy (23;20%). Patients with cardiovascular comorbidity were more likely to develop cardiac complications. Regardless of history of cardiovascular disease, acute cardiac injury and heart failure were more common in deceased patients.ConclusionSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection can cause both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, leading to multi-organ dysfunction in patients at high risk. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory failure, sepsis, acute cardiac injury, and heart failure were the most common critical complications during exacerbation of covid-19.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Follow-up study of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors has rarely been reported. We aimed to investigate longitudinal changes in the characteristics of COVID-19 survivors after discharge. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 594 COVID-19 survivors discharged from Tongji Hospital in Wuhan from February 10 to April 30, 2020 were included and followed up until May 17, 2021. Laboratory and radiological findings, pulmonary function tests, electrocardiogram, symptoms and signs were analyzed. 257 (51.2%) patients had at least one symptom at 3 months post-discharge, which decreased to 169 (40.0%) and 138 (28.4%) at 6-month and 12-month visit respectively. During follow-up period, insomnia, chest tightness, and fatigue were the most prevalent symptoms. Most laboratory parameters returned to normal, whereas increased incidence of abnormal liver and renal function and cardiovascular injury was evidenced after discharge. Fibrous stripes (213; 42.4%), pleural thickening and adhesions (188; 37.5%) and enlarged lymph nodes (120; 23.9%) were the most common radiographical findings at 3 months post-discharge. The abnormalities of pulmonary function included obstructive, restrictive, and mixed, which were 5.5%, 4.0%, 0.9% at 6 months post, and 1.9%, 4.7%, 0.2% at 12 months. Electrocardiogram abnormalities occurred in 256 (51.0%) patients at 3 months post-discharge, including arrhythmia, ST-T change and conduction block, which increased to 258 (61.1%) cases at 6-month visit and were maintained at high frequency (242;49.8%) at 12-month visit. CONCLUSIONS: Physiological, laboratory, radiological or electrocardiogram abnormalities, particularly those related to renal, cardiovascular, liver functions are common in patients who recovered from COVID-19 up to 12months post-discharge.

4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 57, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702971

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly transmissible disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that poses a major threat to global public health. Although COVID-19 primarily affects the respiratory system, causing severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in severe cases, it can also result in multiple extrapulmonary complications. The pathogenesis of extrapulmonary damage in patients with COVID-19 is probably multifactorial, involving both the direct effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the indirect mechanisms associated with the host inflammatory response. Recognition of features and pathogenesis of extrapulmonary complications has clinical implications for identifying disease progression and designing therapeutic strategies. This review provides an overview of the extrapulmonary complications of COVID-19 from immunological and pathophysiologic perspectives and focuses on the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets for the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Lymphopenia/complications , Myocarditis/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/virology , Myocarditis/drug therapy , Myocarditis/immunology , Myocarditis/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/immunology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325276

ABSTRACT

Background: The implications of the menstrual cycle for disease susceptibility, development, and severity of acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are largely unknown. Case presentation: We report a 37-year-old woman infected with SARS-CoV-2 who showed a 16-day incubation period. She developed a fever on the first day of her menstrual period, and again on the first day of her next menstrual period after hospital discharge. RT-PCR test results were positive during the first menstrual period before admission, turned negative during hospitalization, and then positive again during the second menstrual period after hospital discharge. Conclusions: : This case indicates sex hormones may play an important role in SARS-CoV-2 infection. For women with history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the management protocol should include assessment of the menstrual status.

6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319504

ABSTRACT

Background: In December 2019, a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout China. The immune response is likely to be highly involved in the pathological process of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, information on specific changes of immune response in COVID-19 are limited. Methods: Demographic and clinical data of all confirmed cases with COVID-19 on admission at Tongji Hospital from January 10 to February 12, 2020, were collected and analyzed. The expression of lymphocytes, lymphocyte subsets, infection related biomarkers and inflammatory cytokines were analyzed and compared between severe cases and non-severe patients. Findings: Of the 452 patients with COVID-19 recruited from January 10 to February 12, 2020, 286 were diagnosed as severe infection. The median age was 58 years and 235 were male. 201 patients had chronic diseases and a higher percentage in the severe cases. The most common symptoms were fever, shortness of breath, expectoration, and fatigue. Severe cases tend to have higher white blood cell and neutrophil lymphopenia ratio (NLR), as well as lower percentages of monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. Most of severe cases demonstrated elevated levels of infection-related biomarkers, and inflammatory cytokines. The numbers of B cells, T cells and NK cells was significantly decreased in patients with COVID-19, and more severely decreased in the severe cases. T cells were shown to be most affected by SARS-CoV-2, and more hampered in severe cases. Both helper T cells and suppressor T cells in patients with COVID-19 were below normal levels. Helper T cells tend to be more affected in severe cases. The percentage of naïve helper T cells increased and memory helper T cells decreased in severe cases. Patients with COVID-19 have lower level of regulatory T cells, and more obviously damaged in severe cases. Interpretation: SARS-CoV-2 might mainly act on lymphocytes, especially T lymphocytes, and induce a cytokine storm in the body, generate a series of immune responses. Surveillance of NLR and lymphocyte subsets is helpful in the early screening of critical illness, diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19.Funding Statement: None.Declaration of Interests: All authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: The study was performed in accordance with Tongji Hospital Ethics Committee (IRB ID: TJ-C20200121). Written informed consent was waived by the Ethics Commission of the designated hospital for emerging infectious disease.

7.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316850

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection is a global public health issue and has now affected more than 70 countries worldwide. Severe adult respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pneumonia is associated with high risk of mortality. However, prognostic factors assessing poor clinical outcomes of individual patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia remain unclear. Methods: : We conducted a retrospective, multicenter study of patients with SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted to four hospitals in Wuhan, China from December 2019 to February 2020. Mortality at the of end of follow up period was the primary outcome. Prognostic factors for mortality were also assessed and a prognostic model was developed, calibrated and validated. Results: : The study included 492 patients with SARS-CoV-2, which were divided into three cohorts, the training cohort (n=237), the validation cohort 1 (n=120), and the validation cohort 2 (n=135). Multivariate analysis showed that five clinical parameters were predictive of mortality at the end of follow up period, including age, odds ratio (OR), 1.1 / years increase (p<0.001);neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio OR, 1.14 (p<0.001), body temperature on admission OR, 1.53 / °C increase (p=0.005), increase of aspartate transaminase OR, 2.47 (p=0.019), and decrease of total protein OR, 1.69 (p=0.018).Furthermore, the prognostic model drawn from the training cohort was validated with the validation cohort 1 and 2 with comparable area under curve (AUC) at 0.912, 0.928, and 0.883, respectively. While individual survival probabilities were assessed, the model yielded a Harrell’s C index of 0.758 for the training cohort, 0.762 for the validation cohort 1, and 0.711 for the validation cohort 2, which were comparable among each other. Conclusions: : A validated prognostic model was developed to assist in determining the clinical prognosis for SARS- CoV-2 pneumonia. Using this established model, individual patients categorized in the high risk group were associated with an increased risk of mortality, whereas patients predicted in the low risk group had a high probability of survival.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316849

ABSTRACT

Background: Elderly patients infected with COVID-19 are reported to be facing a substantially increased risk of mortality. Clinical characteristics, treatment options, and potential survival factors remain under investigation. This study aimed to fill this gap and provide clinically relevant factors associated with survival of elderly patients with COVID-19.MethodsIn this multi-center study, elderly patients (age ≥65 years old) with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from 4 Wuhan hospitals were included. The clinical end point was hospital discharge or deceased with last date of follow-up on Mar. 08, 2020. Clinical, demographic, and laboratory data were collected.Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to analyze survival and risk factors. A metabolic flux analysis using a large-scale molecular model was applied to investigate the pathogenesis of SARS- CoV-2 with regard to metabolism pathways.ResultsA total of 223 elderly patients infected with COVID-19 were included, 91 (40.8%) were discharged and 132 (59.2%) deceased. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developed in 140 (62.8%) patients, 23 (25.3%) of these patients survived. Multivariate analysis showed that potential risk factors were D- Dimer (odds ratio: 1.13 [95% CI 1.04 - 1.22], p=.005), immune-related metabolic index (6.42 [95% CI 2.66 - 15.48], p<.001), and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (1.08 [95% 1.03 - 1.13], p<.001). Elderly patients receiving interferon atmotherapy showed an increased probability of survival (0.29 [95% CI0.17 - 0.51], p<.001). Based on these factors, an algorithm (AlgSurv) was developed to predict survival for elderly patients. The metabolic flux analysis showed that 12 metabolic pathways including phenylalanine (odds ratio: 28.27 [95% CI 10.56 - 75.72], p<0.001), fatty acid (15.61 [95% CI 6.66 - 36.6], p<0.001), and pyruvate (12.86 [95% CI 5.85 - 28.28], p<0.001) showed a consistently lower flux in the surviving versus the deceased subgroup. This may reflect a key pathogenesis of COVID-19 infection.ConclusionAlthough a high mortality has been reported for elderly patients with COVID-19, in this analysis, several factors such as interferon atmotherapy and activity of metabolic pathways were found to be associated with survival of elderly patients. Based on these findings, the survival algorithm (AlgSurv) was developed to assist the clinical stratification for elderly patients. Deregulation of metabolic pathways revealed in this study may aid in the drug development against COVID-19.

9.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med ; 2022: 9791434, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642949
10.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2022: 5397733, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635531

ABSTRACT

The infection of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) seriously threatens human life. It is urgent to generate effective and safe specific antibodies (Abs) against the pathogenic elements of COVID-19. Mice were immunized with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein antigens: S ectodomain-1 (CoV, in short) mixed in Alum adjuvant for 2 times and boosted with CoV weekly for 6 times. A portion of mice were treated with Maotai liquor (MTL, in short) or/and heat stress (HS) together with CoV boosting. We observed that the anti-CoV Ab was successfully induced in mice that received the CoV/Alum immunization for 2 times. However, upon boosting with CoV, the CoV Ab production diminished progressively; spleen CoV Ab-producing plasma cell counts reduced, in which substantial CoV-specific Ab-producing plasma cells (sPC) were apoptotic. Apparent oxidative stress signs were observed in sPCs; the results were reproduced by exposing sPCs to CoV in the culture. The presence of MTL or/and HS prevented the CoV-induced oxidative stress in sPCs and promoted and stabilized the CoV Ab production in mice in re-exposure to CoV. In summary, CoV/Alum immunization can successfully induce CoV Ab production in mice that declines upon reexposure to CoV. Concurrent administration of MTL/HS stabilizes and promotes the CoV Ab production in mice.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Apoptosis , COVID-19/immunology , Plasma Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Superoxide Dismutase-1/physiology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Alcoholic Beverages , Alum Compounds , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Heat-Shock Response , Immunization, Secondary , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Janus Kinase 2/physiology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Oxidative Stress , Plasma Cells/drug effects , Plasma Cells/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , STAT1 Transcription Factor/physiology , Signal Transduction , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e047227, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398666

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate epidemiological characteristics and transmission dynamics of COVID-19 outbreak resurged in Beijing and to assess the effects of three non-pharmaceutical interventions. DESIGN: Descriptive and modelling study based on surveillance data of COVID-19 in Beijing. SETTING: Outbreak in Beijing. PARTICIPANTS: The database included 335 confirmed cases of COVID-19. METHODS: To conduct spatiotemporal analyses of the outbreak, we collected individual records on laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 from 11 June 2020 to 5 July 2020 in Beijing, and visitor flow and products transportation data of Xinfadi Wholesale Market. We also built a modified susceptible-exposed-infected-removed model to investigate the effect of interventions deployed in Beijing. RESULTS: We found that the staff working in the market (52.2%) and the people around 10 km to this epicentre (72.5%) were most affected, and the population mobility entering-exiting Xinfadi Wholesale Market significantly contributed to the spread of COVID-19 (p=0.021), but goods flow of the market had little impact on the virus spread (p=0.184). The prompt identification of Xinfadi Wholesale Market as the infection source could have avoided a total of 25 708 (95% CI 13 657 to 40 625) cases if unnoticed transmission lasted for a month. Based on the model, we found that active screening on targeted population by nucleic acid testing alone had the most significant effect. CONCLUSIONS: The non-pharmaceutical interventions deployed in Beijing, including localised lockdown, close-contact tracing and community-based testing, were proved to be effective enough to contain the outbreak. Beijing has achieved an optimal balance between epidemic containment and economic protection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Beijing/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Jpn J Infect Dis ; 74(4): 359-366, 2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380104

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to develop and validate a bedside risk analysis system for predicting the clinical severity and prognosis of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In total, 444 COVID-19 patients were included and randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to 2 groups: derivation group and validation group. The new scoring system comprised of the following 8 variables: history of malignant diseases, history of diabetes mellitus, dyspnea, respiratory rate >24 breaths/min, C-reactive protein level >14 mg/L, white blood cell count >8×109/L, platelets count <180 × 1012/L, and lymphocyte count <1 × 109/L. The sensitivity analysis revealed that this new scoring system was more efficient than the sequential organ failure assessment scoring system on the first day of admission. The receiver characteristic curve analysis revealed that the new risk scoring predicted the severe cases of COVID-19 infection with an area under the curve of 0.831 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.783-0.879) and 0.798 (95% CI: 0.727-0.869) in the derivation and validation groups, respectively. This proposed risk score system is a fairly reliable and robust tool for evaluating the severity and prognosis of patients with COVID-19. This may help in the early identification of severe COVID-19 patients with poor prognosis, requiring more intense interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Risk Assessment/methods , Aged , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356658

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Follow-up study of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors has rarely been reported. We aimed to investigate longitudinal changes in the characteristics of COVID-19 survivors after discharge. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 594 COVID-19 survivors discharged from Tongji Hospital in Wuhan from February 10 to April 30, 2020 were included and followed up until May 17, 2021. Laboratory and radiological findings, pulmonary function tests, electrocardiogram, symptoms and signs were analyzed. 257 (51.2%) patients had at least one symptom at 3 months post-discharge, which decreased to 169 (40.0%) and 138 (28.4%) at 6-month and 12-month visit respectively. During follow-up period, insomnia, chest tightness, and fatigue were the most prevalent symptoms. Most laboratory parameters returned to normal, whereas increased incidence of abnormal liver and renal function and cardiovascular injury was evidenced after discharge. Fibrous stripes (213; 42.4%), pleural thickening and adhesions (188; 37.5%) and enlarged lymph nodes (120; 23.9%) were the most common radiographical findings at 3 months post-discharge. The abnormalities of pulmonary function included obstructive, restrictive, and mixed, which were 5.5%, 4.0%, 0.9% at 6 months post, and 1.9%, 4.7%, 0.2% at 12 months. Electrocardiogram abnormalities occurred in 256 (51.0%) patients at 3 months post-discharge, including arrhythmia, ST-T change and conduction block, which increased to 258 (61.1%) cases at 6-month visit and were maintained at high frequency (242;49.8%) at 12-month visit. CONCLUSIONS: Physiological, laboratory, radiological or electrocardiogram abnormalities, particularly those related to renal, cardiovascular, liver functions are common in patients who recovered from COVID-19 up to 12months post-discharge.

14.
J Med Virol ; 93(1): 541-545, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206793

ABSTRACT

The implications of the menstrual cycle for disease susceptibility, development, and severity of acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are largely unknown. Here, we describe two women infected with SARS-CoV-2 whose real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test results and symptoms changed during the menstrual cycle. The first patient developed a fever on the first day of her menstrual period, and again on the first day of her next menstrual period after hospital discharge. RT-PCR test results were positive during the first menstrual period before admission, but turned negative during hospitalization, and then were positive again during the second menstrual period after hospital discharge. Another one also developed a fever again on the first day of her menstrual period after hospital discharge. RT-PCR test results were negative before admission and during hospitalization, but turned positive during the first menstrual period after hospital discharge. The cases indicate sex hormones may play an important role in SARS-CoV-2 infection. For women with history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the management protocol should include assessment of the menstrual status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Menstrual Cycle/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods
15.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 596518, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156116

ABSTRACT

Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT04365634. Context: Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased severity and mortality of disease in COVID-19 pneumonia. So far the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) or hyperglycemia on the immune system among COVID-19 disease has remained unclear. Objective: We aim to explore the clinical and immunological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among COVID-19 patients. Design and Methods: In this retrospective study, the clinical and immunological characteristics of 306 hospitalized confirmed COVID-19 patients (including 129 diabetic and 177 non-diabetic patients) were analyzed. The serum concentrations of laboratory parameters including cytokines and numbers of immune cells were measured and compared between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Results: Compared with non-diabetic group, diabetic cases more frequently had lymphopenia and hyperglycemia, with higher levels of urea nitrogen, myoglobin, D-dimer and ferritin. Diabetic cases indicated the obviously elevated mortality and the higher levels of cytokines IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, as well as the distinctly reduced Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios compared with non-diabetic cases. The longitudinal assays showed that compared to that at week 1, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly elevated at week 2 after admission in non-survivors of diabetic cases, whereas there were greatly reductions from week 1 to week 2 in survivors of diabetic cases. Compared with survival diabetic patients, non-survival diabetic cases displayed distinct higher serum concentrations of IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and lower Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios at week 2. Samples from a subset of participants were evaluated by flow cytometry for the immune cells. The counts of peripheral total T lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells were markedly lower in diabetic cases than in non-diabetic cases. The non-survivors showed the markedly declined counts of CD8+ T cells and NK cells than survivors. Conclusion: The elevated cytokines, imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios and reduced of peripheral numbers of CD8+ T cells and NK cells might contribute to the pathogenic mechanisms of high mortality of COVID-19 patients with T2DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , China/epidemiology , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/immunology , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/complications , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th1 Cells/pathology , Th2 Cells/pathology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085096

ABSTRACT

Western countries are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases and deaths due to increasing public transportation during holiday seasons. This study aimed to explore whether mainland China will face an epidemic rebound during the Spring Festival holiday, when millions of Chinese people travel across the country, and investigate which nucleic acid testing (NAT) strategy is optimal to contain the epidemic. A microsimulation model was used to simulate SARS-CoV-2 transmission among railway travelers and evaluated the effects of various NAT strategies. An extended susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) model was built to forecast local transmission during the Spring Festival period under different scenarios of testing strategies. The total number of infections, testing burden, and medical expenditure were calculated to devise an optimal strategy during the Spring Festival travel rush. Assuming the daily incidence of 20 per 10 million persons, our model simulated that there would be 97 active infections on the day of travel among 10 million railway passengers without NAT and symptom screening. Pre-travel testing could reduce the number of active infections. Compared with no NAT, testing passengers from risk tier 2-4 regions 3 days before travelling could significantly reduce the risk of transmission, and it is more economical and efficient than testing for all passengers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Holidays , Travel , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Computer Simulation , Humans , Seasons
17.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 595503, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054985

ABSTRACT

Background: Elderly patients infected with COVID-19 are reported to be facing a substantially increased risk of mortality. Clinical characteristics, treatment options, and potential survival factors remain under investigation. This study aimed to fill this gap and provide clinically relevant factors associated with survival of elderly patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this multi-center study, elderly patients (age ≥65 years old) with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from 4 Wuhan hospitals were included. The clinical end point was hospital discharge or deceased with last date of follow-up on Jul. 08, 2020. Clinical, demographic, and laboratory data were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to analyze survival and risk factors. A metabolic flux analysis using a large-scale molecular model was applied to investigate the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 with regard to metabolism pathways. Results: A total of 223 elderly patients infected with COVID-19 were included, 91 (40.8%) were discharged and 132 (59.2%) deceased. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developed in 140 (62.8%) patients, 23 (25.3%) of these patients survived. Multivariate analysis showed that potential risk factors for mortality were elevated D-Dimer (odds ratio: 1.13 [95% CI 1.04 - 1.22], p = 0.005), high immune-related metabolic index (6.42 [95% CI 2.66-15.48], p < 0.001), and increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (1.08 [95% 1.03-1.13], p < 0.001). Elderly patients receiving interferon atmotherapy showed an increased probability of survival (0.29 [95% CI 0.17-0.51], p < 0.001). Based on these factors, an algorithm (AlgSurv) was developed to predict survival for elderly patients. The metabolic flux analysis showed that 12 metabolic pathways including phenylalanine (odds ratio: 28.27 [95% CI 10.56-75.72], p < 0.001), fatty acid (15.61 [95% CI 6.66-36.6], p < 0.001), and pyruvate (12.86 [95% CI 5.85-28.28], p < 0.001) showed a consistently lower flux in the survivors vs. the deceased subgroup. This may reflect a key pathogenic mechanism of COVID-19 infection. Conclusion: Several factors such as interferon atmotherapy and recreased activity of specific metabolic pathways were found to be associated with survival of elderly patients. Based on these findings, a survival algorithm (AlgSurv) was developed to assist the clinical stratification for elderly patients. Dysregulation of the metabolic pathways revealed in this study may aid in the drug and vaccine development against COVID-19.

18.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 22451, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003312

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) infection is a global public health issue, that has now affected more than 200 countries worldwide and caused a second wave of pandemic. Severe adult respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pneumonia is associated with a high risk of mortality. However, prognostic factors predicting poor clinical outcomes of individual patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia remain under intensive investigation. We conducted a retrospective, multicenter study of patients with SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted to four hospitals in Wuhan, China from December 2019 to February 2020. Mortality at the end of the follow up period was the primary outcome. Factors predicting mortality were also assessed and a prognostic model was developed, calibrated and validated. The study included 492 patients with SARS-CoV-2 who were divided into three cohorts: the training cohort (n = 237), the validation cohort 1 (n = 120), and the validation cohort 2 (n = 135). Multivariate analysis showed that five clinical parameters were predictive of mortality at the end of follow up period, including advanced age [odds ratio (OR), 1.1/years increase (p < 0.001)], increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio [(NLR) OR, 1.14/increase (p < 0.001)], elevated body temperature on admission [OR, 1.53/°C increase (p = 0.005)], increased aspartate transaminase [OR, 2.47 (p = 0.019)], and decreased total protein [OR, 1.69 (p = 0.018)]. Furthermore, the prognostic model drawn from the training cohort was validated with validation cohorts 1 and 2 with comparable area under curves (AUC) at 0.912, 0.928, and 0.883, respectively. While individual survival probabilities were assessed, the model yielded a Harrell's C index of 0.758 for the training cohort, 0.762 for the validation cohort 1, and 0.711 for the validation cohort 2, which were comparable among each other. A validated prognostic model was developed to assist in determining the clinical prognosis for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Using this established model, individual patients categorized in the high risk group were associated with an increased risk of mortality, whereas patients predicted to be in the low risk group had a higher probability of survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Models, Statistical , Mortality , Aged , China , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Lymphopenia/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
19.
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 69(5): 470-474, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At present, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading all over the world. The occurrence of spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients might be higher than the fact, and we should pay high clinical attention to them. METHOD: Data regarding clinical investigation, laboratory investigation, diagnosis, and treatment measures of 21 COVID-19 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax from January to March of 2020 were collected and analyzed in this study. RESULTS: Seven patients had a history of basic lung diseases. All patients used different methods of oxygen therapy before the occurrence of spontaneous pneumothorax according to the severity of the COVID-19, including 18 patients with ventilator-assisted breathing, 2 patients with bilevel positive airway pressure assisted breathing, and 1 patient with mask oxygen inhalation. All patients were confirmed cases of COVID-19 by chest CT (computed tomography) and virus nucleic acid detection and were found to have spontaneous pneumothorax through physical examination, bedside X-ray, and/or bedside ultrasound. 13 of 21 patients combined with pleural effusion at the same time. All the patients underwent closed thoracic drainage for spontaneous pneumothorax and the pleural effusion, if any. Nine patients died, and 12 patients recovered smoothly. CONCLUSION: Spontaneous pneumothorax might be an overlooked complication of COVID-19 patients and may be associated with poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumothorax/etiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Tubes , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumothorax/diagnosis , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med ; 2020: 8899079, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947870

ABSTRACT

Lily disease was first recorded in Synopsis of the Golden Chamber by Zhang Zhongjing. It is a disease of heart and lung internal heat by Yin deficiency, which belongs to the category of emotion disease in Chinese medicine. In recent years, researchers believe that lily disease and depression syndrome of Yin deficiency and internal heat have many similarities in etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations. This review summarizes the clinical symptoms, etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic medication of lily disease and modern Yin-deficient internal heat depression and discusses the relationship between them. Furthermore, the relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and lily disease was discussed from the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment. It provides new ideas for the treatment of COVID-19 and the treatment of psychological problems after recovery.

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