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1.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(6): 1949-1959, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819919

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to investigate eHealth literacy about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among older adults during the pandemic. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic promoted the development of online health care. Higher demand for accessing information from the Internet was seen. METHODS: This was a sequential explanatory mixed-method study, involving a survey of older adults to explore the status and influencing factors of eHealth literacy regarding COVID-19. Semi-structured interviews were used to understand experiences and challenges regarding information retrieval, judgment and utilization. RESULTS: A total of 337 older adults participated in the online questionnaire survey. Overall, older adults had slightly higher scores on eHealth literacy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants' location in the past month and current health issues were associated with eHealth literacy. Qualitative data were collected from nine older adults and included that some older adults retrieved health-related information during the pandemic. However, those who used non-smartphones described difficulties in information retrieval. A glut of misinformation has resulted in an 'infodemic', which has not only increased the difficulty of judging information but also posed challenges in information utilization for older adults. CONCLUSION: Improving older adults' eHealth literacy is essential in promoting an improved response to major public health events and in providing better health care for this group in the future. It is essential that government health agencies and health care providers provide evidence-based health information via social media platforms. Further efforts are needed to combine aspects of traditional and online health care services and provide reliable and updated online information and resources for older adults. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Providing evidence to eHealth literacy improvement and health management of older adults in the context of public health events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electronics , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 11-17, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719332

ABSTRACT

The severe 2019 outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, would be expected to impact the mental health of local medical and nursing staff and thus lead them to seek help. However, those outcomes have yet to be established using epidemiological data. To explore the mental health status of medical and nursing staff and the efficacy, or lack thereof, of critically connecting psychological needs to receiving psychological care, we conducted a quantitative study. This is the first paper on the mental health of medical and nursing staff in Wuhan. Notably, among 994 medical and nursing staff working in Wuhan, 36.9% had subthreshold mental health disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 2.4), 34.4% had mild disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 5.4), 22.4% had moderate disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 9.0), and 6.2% had severe disturbance (mean PHQ-9: 15.1) in the immediate wake of the viral epidemic. The noted burden fell particularly heavily on young women. Of all participants, 36.3% had accessed psychological materials (such as books on mental health), 50.4% had accessed psychological resources available through media (such as online push messages on mental health self-help coping methods), and 17.5% had participated in counseling or psychotherapy. Trends in levels of psychological distress and factors such as exposure to infected people and psychological assistance were identified. Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions. These findings emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Mental Health Services , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 690295, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305691

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have an impact on the psychological distress of organ transplant recipients. We aimed to assess the status of psychological distress and its association with quality of life (QoL) in organ transplant recipients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 305 organ transplant recipients during March 30 and April 2, 2020, in Wuhan. Psychological distress comprised depression, anxiety, insomnia, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, and Impact of event scale-revised. QoL was assessed using the Chinese version of the short Form 36-item health survey. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and PTSD in organ transplant recipients was 13.4, 6.9, 11.8, and 30.5%, respectively. Organ transplant recipients with depression had significantly lower scores in all eight dimensions of QoL compared with participants without depression (all p < 0.05). Lower scores on the QoL dimensions of role physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, role emotional, and mental health were found in organ transplant recipients with anxiety, insomnia, or PTSD compared with their counterparts without the respective disorder (all p < 0.05). Limitation: The cross-sectional study design limited us to make causal conclusion and the influence of potential confounders cannot be ruled out. Conclusions: Psychological distress was prevalent in organ transplant recipients during the COVID-19 pandemic, and those with depression, anxiety, insomnia, and PTSD had poorer QoL. Therefore, timely psychological counseling, COVID-19 related health education, and essential community medical services should be provided to organ transplant recipients to relieve their psychological distress, and to improve their QoL.

4.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e047828, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225708

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the magnitude of mental health outcomes and associated factors among psychiatric professionals in mental health services during COVID-19 in China. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This cross-sectional, survey-based, region-stratified study collected demographic data and mental health measurements from psychiatric professionals in 34 hospitals between 29 January and 7 February 2020, in China. Hospitals equipped with fever clinics or deployed on wards for patients with COVID-19 were eligible. PRIMARY OUTCOME AND MEASURES: The severity of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and distress were assessed by the Chinese versions of 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, 7-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder, 7-item Insomnia Severity Index and 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression and structural equation modelling was performed to identify factors associated with mental health outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 610 psychiatric professionals were included. 29.8% were employed in Wuhan, and 22.5% were frontline workers. A considerable proportion of participants reported symptoms of depression (461 (75.6%)), anxiety (282 (46.2%)), insomnia (336 (55.1%)) and mental stress (481 (78.9%)). Psychiatric symptoms were associated with worrying about infection (eg, OR 2.36 (95% CI 1.27 to 4.39) for anxiety), risks of exposure to COVID-19 (eg, having inadequate personal protection equipment, OR 2.43 (1.32 to 4.47) for depression) and self-perceived physical health (eg, OR 3.22 (2.24 to 4.64) for mental stress). Information sources of COVID-19 were also found to be both positively (eg, information from relatives, OR 2.16 (1.46 to 3.21) for mental stress) and negatively (eg, information from TV, OR 0.52 (0.35 to 0.77) for mental stress) associated with mental stress. There is preliminary evidence that mental health might benefit from greater availability of mental healthcare services. The structural equation model analysis indicated that worrying about infection may be the primary mediator via which risk of exposure to COVID-19 pandemic affects the mental health of psychiatric professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The current findings demonstrate several pathways via which the COVID-19 pandemic may have negatively affected the mental health of psychiatric professionals in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Internet , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
5.
J Psychiatr Res ; 137: 393-400, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135471

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed both physical and psychological burdens on healthcare workers (HCWs). What is more, few studies have focused on the gender differences in mental health problems (MHPs) among HCWs during such an outbreak. Thus, the current study investigated the prevalence and gender differences of various MHPs among HCWs in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. This nationwide survey was conducted online from January 29 to February 3, 2020. General information was collected by questions about socio-demographics, work-related factors, and living situations. Depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. Among the 2198 contacted HCWs, 1563 (71.1%) responded with valid data, of whom 1293 (82.7%) were females. The prevalences of depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms in participants were 50.7%, 44.7%, 52.5%, and 36.1%, respectively. Female HCWs had significantly higher scores in all four scales (p < 0.001) and higher prevalences in all MHPs involved (range, odds ratio [OR] 1.55-1.97). After adjusting for potential confounders, female HCWs still had higher risks for all MHPs involved than males (range, adjusted OR 1.36-1.96). HCWs present high prevalences of depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms during the COVID-19 outbreak. Furthermore, female HCWs are more vulnerable to all MHPs involved. These findings highlight the need for timely, special care and support for HCWs during the outbreak, especially for females.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 348, 2020 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867547

ABSTRACT

To study the acute psychological effects of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak among healthcare workers (HCWs) in China, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among HCWs during the early period of COVID-19 outbreak. The acute psychological effects including symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire, and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and PTSD was estimated at 15.0%, 27.1%, and 9.8%, respectively. Having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, receiving insufficient training for protection, and lacking confidence in protection measures were significantly associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Being a nurse, having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, and lacking confidence in protection measures were risk factors for PTSD. Meanwhile, not worrying about infection was a protective factor for developing depression, anxiety, and PTSD. Psychological interventions should be implemented among HCWs during the COVID-19 outbreak to reduce acute psychological effects and prevent long-term psychological comorbidities. Meanwhile, HCWs should be well trained and well protected before their frontline exposure.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-532

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused not only extraordinary public health concerns but also tremendous psychological dis

11.
Front Psychiatry ; 11: 306, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-151710

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) not only caused particularly large public health problems, but also caused great psychological distress, especially for medical staff. We aimed to investigate the prevalence rate of insomnia and to confirm the related social psychological factors among medical staff in hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHOD: Medical staff members in China were recruited, including frontline medical workers. The questionnaire, administered through the WeChat program, obtained demographic data and asked self-design questions related to the COVID-19 outbreak, insomnia/depressive/anxiety symptoms, and stress-related symptoms. We used a logistic regression analysis to examine the associations between sociodemographic factors and insomnia symptoms. RESULT: There were a total of 1,563 participants in our study. Five-hundred-and-sixty-four (36.1%) participants had insomnia symptoms according to the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) (total score ≥ 8). A multiple binary logistic regression model revealed that insomnia symptoms were associated with an education level of high school or below (OR = 2.69, p = 0.042, 95% CI = 1.0-7.0), being a doctor (OR = 0.44, p = 0.007, 95% CI = 0.2-0.8), currently working in an isolation unit (OR = 1.71, p = 0.038, 95% CI = 1.0-2.8), is worried about being infected (OR = 2.30, p < 0.001, 95% CI = 1.6-3.4), perceived lack of helpfulness in terms of psychological support from news or social media with regard to COVID-19 (OR = 2.10, p = 0.001, 95% CI = 1.3-3.3), and having very strong uncertainty regarding effective disease control (OR = 3.30, p = 0.013, 95% CI = 1.3-8.5). CONCLUSION: Our study found that more than one-third of the medical staff suffered insomnia symptoms during the COVID-19 outbreak. The related factors included education level, an isolation environment, psychological worries about the COVID-19 outbreak, and being a doctor. Interventions for insomnia among medical staff are needed considering the various sociopsychological factors at play in this situation.

12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(3): e203976, 2020 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-11724

ABSTRACT

Importance: Health care workers exposed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could be psychologically stressed. Objective: To assess the magnitude of mental health outcomes and associated factors among health care workers treating patients exposed to COVID-19 in China. Design, Settings, and Participants: This cross-sectional, survey-based, region-stratified study collected demographic data and mental health measurements from 1257 health care workers in 34 hospitals from January 29, 2020, to February 3, 2020, in China. Health care workers in hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 were eligible. Main Outcomes and Measures: The degree of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and distress was assessed by the Chinese versions of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, the 7-item Insomnia Severity Index, and the 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with mental health outcomes. Results: A total of 1257 of 1830 contacted individuals completed the survey, with a participation rate of 68.7%. A total of 813 (64.7%) were aged 26 to 40 years, and 964 (76.7%) were women. Of all participants, 764 (60.8%) were nurses, and 493 (39.2%) were physicians; 760 (60.5%) worked in hospitals in Wuhan, and 522 (41.5%) were frontline health care workers. A considerable proportion of participants reported symptoms of depression (634 [50.4%]), anxiety (560 [44.6%]), insomnia (427 [34.0%]), and distress (899 [71.5%]). Nurses, women, frontline health care workers, and those working in Wuhan, China, reported more severe degrees of all measurements of mental health symptoms than other health care workers (eg, median [IQR] Patient Health Questionnaire scores among physicians vs nurses: 4.0 [1.0-7.0] vs 5.0 [2.0-8.0]; P = .007; median [interquartile range {IQR}] Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale scores among men vs women: 2.0 [0-6.0] vs 4.0 [1.0-7.0]; P < .001; median [IQR] Insomnia Severity Index scores among frontline vs second-line workers: 6.0 [2.0-11.0] vs 4.0 [1.0-8.0]; P < .001; median [IQR] Impact of Event Scale-Revised scores among those in Wuhan vs those in Hubei outside Wuhan and those outside Hubei: 21.0 [8.5-34.5] vs 18.0 [6.0-28.0] in Hubei outside Wuhan and 15.0 [4.0-26.0] outside Hubei; P < .001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed participants from outside Hubei province were associated with lower risk of experiencing symptoms of distress compared with those in Wuhan (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.88; P = .008). Frontline health care workers engaged in direct diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with COVID-19 were associated with a higher risk of symptoms of depression (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.11-2.09; P = .01), anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.22-2.02; P < .001), insomnia (OR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.92-4.60; P < .001), and distress (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.25-2.04; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey of heath care workers in hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan and other regions in China, participants reported experiencing psychological burden, especially nurses, women, those in Wuhan, and frontline health care workers directly engaged in the diagnosis, treatment, and care for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19 , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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