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1.
Magnetochemistry ; 8(4):41, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1785798

ABSTRACT

In this study, we prepared a streptavidin magnetic bead based on graphene-coated iron nitride magnetic beads (G@FeN-MB) and tried to use it for the enrichment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). The outer shell of our magnetic bead was wrapped with multiple graphene sheets, and there is no report on the application of graphene to the magnetic-bead-coating material. First, the graphene shell of G@FeN-MB was oxidized by a modified Hummer method so as to generate the carboxyl groups required for the coupling of streptavidin (SA) on the surface of the magnetic beads. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the oxidized G@FeN-MB (GO@FeN-MB). Streptavidin was then linked to the surface of the GO@FeN-MB by coupling the amino of the streptavidin with the carboxyl on the magnetic beads by carbodiimide method;thus, the streptavidin magnetic beads (SAMBs) were successfully prepared. To prove the practicality of the SAMBs, biotinylated SARS-CoV-2 S1 antibody was linked with it to respectively capture SARS-CoV-2 Spike-protein-coupled polystyrene beads (S-PS) and pseudovirus with S-protein expressed. Microplate reader and fluorescence microscope results show that the SAMBs can effectively enrich viruses. In conclusion, the preparation of SAMBs with G@FeN-MB is feasible and has potential for application in the field of virus enrichment.

3.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 759152, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497097

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can present with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. However, the prevalence of GI symptoms and their association with outcomes remain controversial in COVID-19 patients. Methods: All COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to the Wuhan Huoshenshan hospital from February 2020 to April 2020 were collected. Disease severity and outcomes were compared between COVID-19 patients with and without GI symptoms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of GI symptoms with the composite endpoint and death in COVID-19 patients. A composite endpoint was defined as transfer to intensive care unit, requirement of mechanical ventilation, and death. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: Overall, 2,552 COVID-19 patients were included. The prevalence of GI symptoms was 21.0% (537/2,552). Diarrhea (8.9%, 226/2,552) was the most common GI symptom. Patients with GI symptoms had significantly higher proportions of severe COVID-19 and worse outcomes than those without. Univariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that GI symptoms were significantly associated with the composite endpoint (OR = 2.426, 95% CI = 1.608-3.661; P < 0.001) and death (OR = 2.137, 95% CI = 1.209-3.778; P = 0.009). After adjusting for age, sex, and severe/critical COVID-19, GI symptoms were still independently associated with the composite endpoint (OR = 2.029, 95% CI = 1.294-3.182; P = 0.002), but not death (OR = 1.726, 95% CI = 0.946-3.150; P = 0.075). According to the type of GI symptoms, GI bleeding was an independent predictor of the composite endpoint (OR = 8.416, 95% CI = 3.465-20.438, P < 0.001) and death (OR = 6.640, 95% CI = 2.567-17.179, P < 0.001), but not other GI symptoms (i.e., diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, nausea and/or vomiting, constipation, acid reflux and/or heartburn, or abdominal pain). Conclusion: GI symptoms are common in COVID-19 patients and may be associated with their worse outcomes. Notably, such a negative impact of GI symptoms on the outcomes should be attributed to GI bleeding.

4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25497, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262269

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients frequently develop liver biochemical abnormality. However, liver biochemical abnormality in COVID-19 patients with liver cirrhosis is under-recognized.Patients hospitalized during COVID-19 pandemic in China (ie, from February to April 2020) were screened. All of 17 COVID-19 patients with liver cirrhosis consecutively admitted to the Wuhan Huoshenshan Hospital were identified. Meanwhile, 17 age-, sex-, and severity-matched COVID-19 patients without liver cirrhosis admitted to this hospital were selected as a control group; all of 14 cirrhotic patients without COVID-19 consecutively admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of the General Hospital of Northern Theater Command were selected as another control group. Incidence of liver biochemical abnormality and decompensated events were primarily compared.Among the COVID-19 patients with liver cirrhosis, the incidence of liver biochemical abnormality at admission and during hospitalization were 76.50% and 84.60%, respectively; 7 (41.20%) had decompensated events at admission; 1 was transferred to intensive care unit due to gastrointestinal bleeding. Among the COVID-19 patients without liver cirrhosis, the incidence of liver biochemical abnormality at admission and during hospitalization were 58.80% (P = .271) and 60.00% (P = .150), respectively. Among the cirrhotic patients without COVID-19, the incidence of liver biochemical abnormality at admission and during hospitalization were 69.20% (P = .657) and 81.80% (P = .855), respectively; 11 (78.60%) had decompensated events at admission (P = .036). None died during hospitalization among the three groups.Liver biochemical abnormality is common in COVID-19 patients with liver cirrhosis. Management of decompensated events in cirrhotic patients without COVID-19 should not be neglected during COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/physiopathology , Liver Function Tests , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , China , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Int J Infect Dis ; 97: 278-282, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459551

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Although COVID-19 is known to be caused by human-to-human transmission, it remains largely unclear whether ambient air pollutants and meteorological parameters could promote its transmission. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to study whether air quality index (AQI), four ambient air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, NO2 and CO) and five meteorological variables (daily temperature, highest temperature, lowest temperature, temperature difference and sunshine duration) could increase COVID-19 incidence in Wuhan and XiaoGan between Jan 26th to Feb 29th in 2020. RESULTS: First, a significant correlation was found between COVID-19 incidence and AQI in both Wuhan (R2=0.13, p<0.05) and XiaoGan (R2=0.223, p<0.01). Specifically, among four pollutants, COVID-19 incidence was prominently correlated with PM2.5 and NO2 in both cities. In Wuhan, the tightest correlation was observed between NO2 and COVID-19 incidence (R2=0.329, p<0.01). In XiaoGan, in addition to the PM2.5 (R2=0.117, p<0.01) and NO2 (R2=0.015, p<0.05), a notable correlation was also observed between the PM10 and COVID-19 incidence (R2=0.105, p<0.05). Moreover, temperature is the only meteorological parameter that constantly correlated well with COVID-19 incidence in both Wuhan and XiaoGan, but in an inverse correlation (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: AQI, PM2.5, NO2, and temperature are four variables that could promote the sustained transmission of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Temperature , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carbon Monoxide/adverse effects , China/epidemiology , Cities , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Incidence , Nitrogen Dioxide/adverse effects , Pandemics , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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