Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
J Thromb Haemost ; 20(6): 1412-1420, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection is associated with an increased incidence of thrombosis. OBJECTIVES: By studying the fibrin network structure of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, we aimed to unravel pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to this increased risk of thrombosis. This may contribute to optimal prevention and treatment of COVID-19 related thrombosis. PATIENTS/METHODS: In this case-control study, we collected plasma samples from intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19, with and without confirmed thrombosis, between April and December 2020. Additionally, we collected plasma from COVID-19 patients admitted to general wards without thrombosis, from ICU patients with pneumococcal infection, and from healthy controls. Fibrin fiber diameters and fibrin network density were quantified in plasma clots imaged with stimulated emission depletion microscopy and confocal microscopy. Finally, we determined the sensitivity to fibrinolysis. RESULTS: COVID-19 ICU patients (n = 37) and ICU patients with pneumococcal disease (n = 7) showed significantly higher fibrin densities and longer plasma clot lysis times than healthy controls (n = 7). No differences were observed between COVID-19 ICU patients with and without thrombosis, or ICU patients with pneumococcal infection. At a second time point, after diagnosis of thrombosis or at a similar time point in patients without thrombosis, we observed thicker fibers and longer lysis times in COVID-19 ICU patients with thrombosis (n = 19) than in COVID-19 ICU patients without thrombosis (n = 18). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that severe COVID-19 is associated with a changed fibrin network structure and decreased susceptibility to fibrinolysis. Because these changes were not exclusive to COVID-19 patients, they may not explain the increased thrombosis risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumococcal Infections , Thrombosis , Case-Control Studies , Fibrin , Fibrin Clot Lysis Time , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pneumococcal Infections/complications
2.
J Thromb Haemost ; 20(5): 1206-1212, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs in one-third of critically-ill COVID-19 patients. Although prior studies identified several pathways contributing to thrombogenicity, it is unknown whether this is COVID-19-specific or also occurs in ARDS patients with another infection. OBJECTIVE: To compare pathway activity among patients having COVID-19 with PE (C19PE+), COVID-19 without PE (C19PE-), and influenza-associated ARDS (IAA) using a targeted proteomics approach. METHODS: We exploited an existing biorepository containing daily plasma samples to carefully match C19PE+ cases to C19PE- and IAA controls on mechanical ventilation duration, PEEP, FiO2, and cardiovascular-SOFA (n = 15 per group). Biomarkers representing various thrombosis pathways were measured using proximity extension- and ELISA-assays. Summed z-scores of individual biomarkers were used to represent total pathway activity. RESULTS: We observed no relevant between-group differences among 22 biomarkers associated with activation of endothelium, platelets, complement, coagulation, fibrinolysis or inflammation, except sIL-1RT2 and sST2, which were lower in C19PE- than IAA (log2-Foldchange -0.67, p = .022 and -1.78, p = .022, respectively). However, total pathway analysis indicated increased activation of endothelium (z-score 0.2 [-0.3-1.03] vs. 0.98 [-2.5--0.3], p = .027), platelets (1.0 [-1.3-3.0] vs. -3.3 [-4.1--0.6], p = .023) and coagulation (0.8 [-0.5-2.0] vs. -1.0 [-1.6-1.0], p = .023) in COVID-19 patients (C19PE+/C19PE- groups combined) compared to IAA. CONCLUSION: We observed only minor differences between matched C19PE+, C19PE-, and IAA patients, which suggests individual biomarkers mostly reflect disease severity. However, analysis of total pathway activity suggested upregulation of some distinct processes in COVID-19 could be etiologically related to increased PE-risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Pulmonary Embolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Thrombosis , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Proteomics , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Mol Med (Berl) ; 100(4): 555-568, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653411

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is overwhelming the healthcare systems. Identification of systemic reactions underlying COVID-19 will lead to new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for monitoring and early intervention in this viral infection. We performed targeted metabolomics covering up to 630 metabolites within several key metabolic pathways in plasma samples of 20 hospitalized COVID-19 patients and 37 matched controls. Plasma metabolic signatures specifically differentiated severe COVID-19 from control patients. The identified metabolic signatures indicated distinct alterations in both lipid and amino acid metabolisms in COVID-19 compared to control patient plasma. Systems biology-based analyses identified sphingolipid, tryptophan, tyrosine, glutamine, arginine, and arachidonic acid metabolism as mostly impacted pathways in COVID-19 patients. Notably, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was significantly reduced in COVID-19 patients and GABA plasma levels allowed for stratification of COVID-19 patients with high sensitivity and specificity. The data reveal large metabolic disturbances in COVID-19 patients and suggest use of GABA as potential biomarker and therapeutic target for the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , Humans , Lipids , Metabolomics , Pandemics , Tryptophan
4.
Hemasphere ; 4(4): e457, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388044

ABSTRACT

Recent evidence is focusing on the presence of a hypercoagulable state with development of both venous and arterial thromboembolic complications in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. The ongoing activation of coagulation related to the severity of the illness is further characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy and endotheliitis. These microangiopathic changes cannot be classified as classical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). In this short review we describe the interaction between coagulation and inflammation with focus on the possible mechanisms that might be involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection associated coagulopathy in the critically ill.

5.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 5(5): e12532, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372774

ABSTRACT

This year's Congress of the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) was hosted virtually from Philadelphia July 17-21, 2021. The conference, now held annually, highlighted cutting-edge advances in basic, population and clinical sciences of relevance to the Society. Despite being held virtually, the 2021 congress was of the same scope and quality as an annual meeting held in person. An added feature of the program is that talks streamed at the designated times will then be available on-line for asynchronous viewing. The program included 77 State of the Art (SOA) talks, thematically grouped in 28 sessions, given by internationally recognized leaders in the field. The SOA speakers were invited to prepare brief illustrated reviews of their talks that were peer reviewed and are included in this article. The topics, across the main scientific themes of the congress, include Arterial Thromboembolism, Coagulation and Natural Anticoagulants, COVID-19 and Coagulation, Diagnostics and Omics, Fibrinogen, Fibrinolysis and Proteolysis, Hemophilia and Rare Bleeding Disorders, Hemostasis in Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity, Pediatrics, Platelet Disorders, von Willebrand Disease and Thrombotic Angiopathies, Platelets and Megakaryocytes, Vascular Biology, Venous Thromboembolism and Women's Health. These illustrated capsules highlight the major scientific advances with potential to impact clinical practice. Readers are invited to take advantage of the excellent educational resource provided by these illustrated capsules. They are also encouraged to use the image in social media to draw attention to the high quality and impact of the science presented at the congress.

6.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 5(5): e12532, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321717

ABSTRACT

This year's Congress of the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) was hosted virtually from Philadelphia July 17-21, 2021. The conference, now held annually, highlighted cutting-edge advances in basic, population and clinical sciences of relevance to the Society. Despite being held virtually, the 2021 congress was of the same scope and quality as an annual meeting held in person. An added feature of the program is that talks streamed at the designated times will then be available on-line for asynchronous viewing. The program included 77 State of the Art (SOA) talks, thematically grouped in 28 sessions, given by internationally recognized leaders in the field. The SOA speakers were invited to prepare brief illustrated reviews of their talks that were peer reviewed and are included in this article. The topics, across the main scientific themes of the congress, include Arterial Thromboembolism, Coagulation and Natural Anticoagulants, COVID-19 and Coagulation, Diagnostics and Omics, Fibrinogen, Fibrinolysis and Proteolysis, Hemophilia and Rare Bleeding Disorders, Hemostasis in Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity, Pediatrics, Platelet Disorders, von Willebrand Disease and Thrombotic Angiopathies, Platelets and Megakaryocytes, Vascular Biology, Venous Thromboembolism and Women's Health. These illustrated capsules highlight the major scientific advances with potential to impact clinical practice. Readers are invited to take advantage of the excellent educational resource provided by these illustrated capsules. They are also encouraged to use the image in social media to draw attention to the high quality and impact of the science presented at the congress.

7.
EBioMedicine ; 67: 103382, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and inflammation are hallmarks of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are associated with increased mortality. Clinical and experimental data have revealed a role for neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in COVID-19 disease. The mechanisms that drive thrombo-inflammation in COVID-19 are poorly understood. METHODS: We performed proteomic analysis and immunostaining of postmortem lung tissues from COVID-19 patients and patients with other lung pathologies. We further compared coagulation factor XII (FXII) and DNase activities in plasma samples from COVID-19 patients and healthy control donors and determined NET-induced FXII activation using a chromogenic substrate assay. FINDINGS: FXII expression and activity were increased in the lung parenchyma, within the pulmonary vasculature and in fibrin-rich alveolar spaces of postmortem lung tissues from COVID-19 patients. In agreement with this, plasmaaac acafajföeFXII activation (FXIIa) was increased in samples from COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, FXIIa colocalized with NETs in COVID-19 lung tissue indicating that NETs accumulation leads to FXII contact activation in COVID-19. We further showed that an accumulation of NETs is partially due to impaired NET clearance by extracellular DNases as DNase substitution improved NET dissolution and reduced FXII activation in vitro. INTERPRETATION: Collectively, our study supports that the NET/FXII axis contributes to the pathogenic chain of procoagulant and proinflammatory responses in COVID-19. Targeting both NETs and FXIIa may offer a potential novel therapeutic strategy. FUNDING: This study was supported by the European Union (840189), the Werner Otto Medical Foundation Hamburg (8/95) and the German Research Foundation (FR4239/1-1, A11/SFB877, B08/SFB841 and P06/KFO306).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Factor XII/metabolism , Autopsy , Case-Control Studies , Deoxyribonucleases/blood , Deoxyribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Neutrophil Activation , Pneumonia , Proteomics
8.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 650129, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221952

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a prothrombotic state and a high incidence of thrombotic event(s) (TE). Objectives: To study platelet reactivity in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and determine a possible association with the clinical outcomes thrombosis and all-cause mortality. Methods: Seventy nine hospitalized COVID-19 patients were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study and provided blood samples in which platelet reactivity in response to stimulation with ADP and TRAP-6 was determined using flow cytometry. Clinical outcomes included thrombotic events, and all-cause mortality. Results: The incidence of TE in this study was 28% and all-cause mortality 16%. Patients that developed a TE were younger than patients that did not develop a TE [median age of 55 vs. 70 years; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.96 per 1 year of age, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.00; p = 0.041]. Furthermore, patients using preexisting thromboprophylaxis were less likely to develop a thrombotic complication than patients that were not (18 vs. 54%; AOR = 0.19, 95% CI 0.04-0.84; p = 0.029). Conversely, having asthma strongly increased the risk on TE development (AOR = 6.2, 95% CI 1.15-33.7; p = 0.034). No significant differences in baseline P-selectin expression or platelet reactivity were observed between the COVID-19 positive patients (n = 79) and COVID-19 negative hospitalized control patients (n = 21), nor between COVID-19 positive survivors or non-survivors. However, patients showed decreased platelet reactivity in response to TRAP-6 following TE development. Conclusion: We observed an association between the use of preexisting thromboprophylaxis and a decreased risk of TE during COVID-19. This suggests that these therapies are beneficial for coping with COVID-19 associated hypercoagulability. This highlights the importance of patient therapy adherence. We observed lowered platelet reactivity after the development of TE, which might be attributed to platelet desensitization during thromboinflammation.

9.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 5(2): 278-290, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120206

ABSTRACT

The incidence of venous thrombosis, mostly pulmonary embolism (PE), ranging from local immunothrombosis to central emboli, but also deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in people with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is reported to be remarkably high. The relevance of better understanding, predicting, treating, and preventing COVID-19-associated venous thrombosis meets broad support, as can be concluded from the high number of research, review, and guideline papers that have been published on this topic. The Dutch COVID & Thrombosis Coalition (DCTC) is a multidisciplinary team involving a large number of Dutch experts in the broad area of venous thrombosis and hemostasis research, combined with experts on virology, critically ill patients, pulmonary diseases, and community medicine, across all university hospitals and many community hospitals in the Netherlands. Within the consortium, clinical data of at least 5000 admitted COVID-19-infected individuals are available, including substantial collections of biobanked materials in an estimated 3000 people. In addition to considerable experience in preclinical and clinical thrombosis research, the consortium embeds virology-hemostasis research models within unique biosafety facilities to address fundamental questions on the interaction of virus with epithelial and vascular cells, in relation to the coagulation and inflammatory system. The DCTC has initiated a comprehensive research program to answer many of the current questions on the pathophysiology and best anticoagulant treatment of COVID-19-associated thrombotic complications. The research program was funded by grants of the Netherlands Thrombosis Foundation and the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development. Here, we summarize the design and main aims of the research program.

10.
J Infect Dis ; 223(8): 1322-1333, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1057852

ABSTRACT

The clinical spectrum of COVID-19 varies and the differences in host response characterizing this variation have not been fully elucidated. COVID-19 disease severity correlates with an excessive proinflammatory immune response and profound lymphopenia. Inflammatory responses according to disease severity were explored by plasma cytokine measurements and proteomics analysis in 147 COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production assays and whole blood flow cytometry were performed. Results confirm a hyperinflammatory innate immune state, while highlighting hepatocyte growth factor and stem cell factor as potential biomarkers for disease severity. Clustering analysis revealed no specific inflammatory endotypes in COVID-19 patients. Functional assays revealed abrogated adaptive cytokine production (interferon-γ, interleukin-17, and interleukin-22) and prominent T-cell exhaustion in critically ill patients, whereas innate immune responses were intact or hyperresponsive. Collectively, this extensive analysis provides a comprehensive insight into the pathobiology of severe to critical COVID-19 and highlights potential biomarkers of disease severity.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Blood Adv ; 4(13): 2967-2978, 2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-625455

ABSTRACT

Thrombocytopenia is a common complication of influenza virus infection, and its severity predicts the clinical outcome of critically ill patients. The underlying cause(s) remain incompletely understood. In this study, in patients with an influenza A/H1N1 virus infection, viral load and platelet count correlated inversely during the acute infection phase. We confirmed this finding in a ferret model of influenza virus infection. In these animals, platelet count decreased with the degree of virus pathogenicity varying from 0% in animals infected with the influenza A/H3N2 virus, to 22% in those with the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus, up to 62% in animals with a highly pathogenic A/H5N1 virus infection. This thrombocytopenia is associated with virus-containing platelets that circulate in the blood. Uptake of influenza virus particles by platelets requires binding to sialoglycans and results in the removal of sialic acids by the virus neuraminidase, a trigger for hepatic clearance of platelets. We propose the clearance of influenza virus by platelets as a paradigm. These insights clarify the pathophysiology of influenza virus infection and show how severe respiratory infections, including COVID-19, may propagate thrombocytopenia and/or thromboembolic complications.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/virology , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Influenza, Human/complications , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid/metabolism , Polysaccharides/metabolism , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Animals , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Platelets/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Ferrets , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Influenza, Human/virology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/complications , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Thrombocytopenia/metabolism , Thrombocytopenia/pathology , Thrombocytopenia/virology , Virus Internalization
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL