Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis ; 5(SUPPL 2), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1509122

ABSTRACT

Background : Patients with COVID-19 have a hypercoagulable state with increased risk of thrombotic venous events (VTE). These thrombotic complications could be responsible for a significant part of the morbidity and mortality seen in COVID-19 patients. The high incidence of VTE is seen even despite the use of apparently adequate thrombosis prophylaxis. Therefore, it is suggested that in COVID-19 patients increased intensity thromboprophylaxis or therapeutic anticoagulation should be considered. Aims : We investigated whether the use of therapeutic anticoagulation prior to infection has a beneficial effect on morbidity and mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Methods : In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, all ≥18 years old COVID-19 patients admitted to 6 hospitals in the Netherlands between March and May 2020 were included. We applied 1:3 propensity score matching to evaluate the association between prior therapeutic anticoagulation use and clinical outcome, with in hospital mortality as primary endpoint. Relevant secondary outcomes included admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), need for invasive mechanical ventilation, pulmonary embolism and length of hospital stay Results : A total of 1154 patients were included, of whom 190 (16%) patients used therapeutic anticoagulation prior to admission. In the propensity score matched analyses, we observed no association between prior use of therapeutic anticoagulation and in hospital mortality compared to no prior use of anticoagulation (RR 1.02 (95% CI;0.80-1.30). We also found no significant differences in secondary outcomes apart from a lower risk of pulmonary embolism in patients using therapeutic anticoagulation prior to infection (RR 0.19 (95% CI;0.05-0.80). Conclusions : Although prior therapeutic anticoagulation use is associated with reduced PE occurrence, it is not associated with better outcome parameters in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in terms of all-cause mortality, ICU admittance, need for mechanical ventilation, and length of hospital stay.

2.
Journal of Urology ; 206(SUPPL 3):e342-e343, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1483603

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has drastically changed didactic residency education. The urologic community displayed its resilience and adaptability by swiftly converting in-person education to webinar events in response to the pandemic. The goal of this study was to analyze the trends of urology webinars since the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The official social media accounts for all AUAregistered urology residency and urologic-oncology fellowship programs were systematically searched for webinar listings. All of the free webinars available to the greater urologic community posted between January 1, 2020 and June 1, 2020 were included in this study. Data was abstracted from each webinar including the date of delivery, topic of discussion, and number of speakers. Temporal trends were analyzed via join-point regression modelling. RESULTS: A total of 450 webinars were offered in the initial 18 weeks following the pandemic declaration. A total of 629 speakers from 96 academic institutions were involved in at least one webinar. The mean webinar duration was 58.7 minutes. At the peak of the “webinar frenzy,” a mean of 7.1 webinars/day were offered with 12.7 speakers/day involved. Urologic webinars increased in availability significantly from weeks 1 to 9 and decreased in availability non-significantly from weeks 10 to 18. Urologic-oncology was the most commonly discussed sub-specialty, representing 113 (25.1%) separate lectures with 151 speakers. Urologic-oncology increased in interest significantly over weeks 1 to 9 (AWPC: 110.7%;p<0.001) with a stable trend (AWPC -5.5, p=0.3) from weeks 10 to 18. Prostate cancer (33.9%) was the most discussed subject, followed by bladder cancer (29.5%), kidney cancer (12.5%), testis cancer (8%), upper urinary tract cancer (7.2%) and penile cancer (3.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our analysis demonstrates impressive and immediate reaction of the academic urologic community and specifically, the urologic-oncologic community, to continuing medical education amidst a pandemic. While webinars have some limitations, they have the opportunity to increase educational access across geographical and financial barriers. Time will show if webinars have a permanent role in the future of medical education or if we have witnessed the rise and fall of a “webin-era.”. (Table Presented).

3.
European Urology ; 79:S1357-S1358, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1357815
4.
Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies ; 11(2):295-310, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1082609

ABSTRACT

This paper explores the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic through the framework of existential risks - a class of extreme risks that threaten the entire future of humanity. In doing so, we tease out three lessons: (1) possible reasons underlying the limits and shortfalls of international law, international institutions and other actors which COVID-19 has revealed, and what they reveal about the resilience or fragility of institutional frameworks in the face of existential risks;(2) using COVID-19 to test and refine our prior 'Boring Apocalypses' model for understanding the interplay of hazards, vulnerabilities and exposures in facilitating a particular disaster, or magnifying its effects;and (3) to extrapolate some possible futures for existential risk scholarship and governance.

5.
Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies ; 11(2):295-310, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1011046

ABSTRACT

This paper explores the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic through the framework of existential risks - a class of extreme risks that threaten the entire future of humanity. In doing so, we tease out three lessons: (1) possible reasons underlying the limits and shortfalls of international law, international institutions and other actors which Covid-19 has revealed, and what they reveal about the resilience or fragility of institutional frameworks in the face of existential risks;(2) using Covid-19 to test and refine our prior 'Boring Apocalypses' model for understanding the interplay of hazards, vulnerabilities and exposures in facilitating a particular disaster, or magnifying its effects;and (3) to extrapolate some possible futures for existential risk scholarship and governance. © 2020

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL