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1.
Mining Weekly ; 28(1), 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1824175
2.
Mining Weekly ; 28(2), 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1824174
3.
European Urology ; 79:S259, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1747436

ABSTRACT

Introduction & Objectives: Representatives from 9 global cancer coalitions/alliances, including international networks of kidney and bladder cancer patient organisations, totaling over 750 cancer patient groups and the interests of over 14 million patients have come together during the pandemic to review and evaluate the patient-perspective impact. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. For organisations that provide support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has put extra strain on them, while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Materials & Methods: 5 coalitions surveyed their member organisations. A number of coalitions consulted their members by individual surveys or consultations. Results: A survey of 157 organisations from 56 countries found that 57% experienced an average increase of 44% in patient calls and emails. 45% reported that their future viability may be under threat because of the impact of COVID-19 on income. Examples of good practice were reported where healthcare systems have acted to protect patients and cancer services. These include the introduction of COVID-free centres, separation of cancer patients from those who may have COVID-19, and the introduction of virtual and telemedicine services. Organisations have also introduced new ways of working including virtual psychological support services and app-based support groups. These best practices should form part of a global plan of action for future health crisis. Conclusions: Collaboration between patient advocacy organisations, governments and health services is needed to ensure the ground lost to the COVID-19 pandemic is regained. Action is required to restore cancer services safely and effectively without delay. Additional resources for organisations that support cancer patients are required to ensure that they continue to provide vital services. Finally, a global plan of action for cancer is required to meet the challenges of any future health crisis.

7.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 848-854, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454702

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Harmonic Scalpel and Ligasure (Covidien) devices are commonly used in head and neck surgery. Parotidectomy is a complex and intricate surgery that requires careful dissection of the facial nerve. This study aimed to compare surgical outcomes in parotidectomy using these haemostatic devices with traditional scalpel and cautery. METHOD: A systematic review of the literature was performed with subsequent meta-analysis of seven studies that compared the use of haemostatic devices to traditional scalpel and cautery in parotidectomy. Outcome measures included: temporary facial paresis, operating time, intra-operative blood loss, post-operative drain output and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: A total of 7 studies representing 675 patients were identified: 372 patients were treated with haemostatic devices, and 303 patients were treated with scalpel and cautery. Statistically significant outcomes favouring the use of haemostatic devices included operating time, intra-operative blood loss and post-operative drain output. Outcome measures that did not favour either treatment included facial nerve paresis and length of hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Overall, haemostatic devices were found to reduce operating time, intra-operative blood loss and post-operative drain output.


Subject(s)
Dissection/adverse effects , Facial Nerve/surgery , Hemostasis, Surgical/instrumentation , Parotid Gland/surgery , Blood Loss, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Drainage/trends , Electrocoagulation/adverse effects , Facial Paralysis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Period , Surgical Instruments/adverse effects
8.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S1147, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432894

ABSTRACT

Background: The Global Cancer Coalitions Network (GCCN), established in May 2020, collectively represents over 750 cancer patient organisations representing over 14 million patients around the world. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. Substantial increases in the number of avoidable cancer deaths are to be expected as a result of diagnostic delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: 6 global cancer coalitions surveyed their member organisations in December 2020. Results: Among 104 organisations from 46 countries representing advanced breast, bladder, colorectal, lymphoma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer patient groups: · Demand for services has increased · 2/3 organisations experienced a fall in income from December 2020, averaging -48% · Over 1 in 10 organisations have closed temporarily, and some permanently · Only 1 in 10 organisations believe their 2021 income will return to levels seen before the pandemic · Almost half report that their ability to operate is under threat · Half do not have access to any national funding schemes to ensure operation during the pandemic · Staff shrunk -20%;volunteer numbers -70% · <20% organisations report normalised cancer services in December 2020;more respondents report services are “worse than ever” · Patient distress, isolation and financial hardship have increased markedly. Conclusions: For organisations providing support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has added strain while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Emergency support, including funding, must be made available to these organisations to ensure that the needs of cancer patients worldwide continue to be met. Legal entity responsible for the study: The authors. Funding: Has not received any funding. Disclosure: All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

9.
European Urology ; 79:S259-S259, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1357858
10.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339378

ABSTRACT

Background: Representatives from 8 global cancer coalitions/alliances, representing 650 cancer patient groups and the interests of over 14 million patients have come together during the pandemic to review and evaluate the patient-perspective impact. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. For organisations that provide support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has put extra strain while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Methods: 5 coalitions surveyed their member organisations. A number of coalitions consulted their members by individual surveys or consultations. Results: A survey of 157 organisations representing advanced breast, bladder, lymphoma, ovarian and pancreatic cancer patient groups from 56 countries found that 57% experienced an average increase of 44% in patient calls and emails. 45% reported that their future viability may be under threat because of the impact of COVID-19 on income. Examples of good practice were reported where healthcare systems have acted to protect patients and cancer services. These include the introduction of COVID-free centres, separation of cancer patients from those who may have COVID-19, and the introduction of virtual and telemedicine services. Organisations have also introduced new ways of working including virtual psychological support services and appbased support groups. These best practices should form part of a global plan of action for future health crisis. Conclusions: Collaboration between patient advocacy organisations, governments and health services is needed to ensure the ground lost to the COVID-19 pandemic is regained. Action is required to restore cancer services safely and effectively without delay. Additional resources for organisations that support cancer patients are required to ensure that they continue to provide vital services. Finally, a global plan of action for cancer is required to meet the challenges of any future health crisis.

11.
Mining Weekly ; 27(10), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1321066
12.
Mining Weekly ; 27(14), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1321065
13.
Mining Weekly ; 27(10), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1321064
14.
Mining Weekly ; 27(18), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1321063
15.
Engineering News ; 41(9), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1320763
16.
Engineering News ; 41(3), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1187495
17.
Engineering News ; 41(2), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1187494
18.
Engineering News ; 41(3), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1187493
19.
Mining Weekly ; 26(37), 2020.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1098370
20.
Mining Weekly ; 26(37), 2020.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1098369
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