Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Haemophilia ; 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511310

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in lifestyle changes for children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on weight/BMI in children with severe bleeding disorders. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of patients age 3-18 years with severe bleeding disorders on prophylactic therapy treated at SickKids Hospital (Toronto, Canada) between February 01, 2018 and March 31, 2021. We evaluated the following pre- and post-COVID variables: weight (kg), weight percentile, BMI (kg/m2 ), BMI percentile, HJHS score, and prophylactic dosing (units/kg). RESULTS: One hundred and four patients were included in the final analysis. Diagnoses were as follows:  haemophilia A (n = 92; 70.8%), haemophilia B (n = 17; 13.1%), type 3 von Willebrand disease (n = 11; 8.5%), the remainder were diagnosed with rare factor deficiencies.  Median interval time from pre-COVID measurements to latest follow-up was 12.4 months (IQR 10.32-14.52 months) during which there was a statistically significant increase in median weight percentile +5.75 centiles (from 63rd centile to 68.75th centile). There was a statistically significant increase in mean BMI of +1.03 kg/m2 (P = < .001) while median BMI percentile increased +8.82 centiles (from 53.9th centile to 62.72nd centile) and mean BMI percentile increased 3.42 centiles (from 57.5 centile to 60.9 centile). The group that gained the most weight centiles, BMI and BMI centiles were 5-14 years old. CONCLUSION: There was a trend to weight gain over the study period. More long-term data is required to evaluate the impact of this increase in weight and BMI on children with bleeding disorders.

2.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E929-E939, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468744

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care workers have a critical role in the pandemic response to COVID-19 and may be at increased risk of infection. The objective of this study was to assess the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies among health care workers during and after the first wave of the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study involving health care workers in Ontario, Canada, to detect IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Blood samples and self-reported questionnaires were obtained at enrolment, at 6 weeks and at 12 weeks. A community hospital, tertiary care pediatric hospital and a combined adult-pediatric academic health centre enrolled participants from Apr. 1 to Nov. 13, 2020. Predictors of seropositivity were evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for clustering by hospital site. RESULTS: Among the 1062 health care workers participating, the median age was 40 years, and 834 (78.5%) were female. Overall, 57 (5.4%) were seropositive at any time point (2.5% when participants with prior infection confirmed by polymerase chain reaction testing were excluded). Seroprevalence was higher among those who had a known unprotected exposure to a patient with COVID-19 (p < 0.001) and those who had been contacted by public health because of a nonhospital exposure (p = 0.003). Providing direct care to patients with COVID-19 or working on a unit with a COVID-19 outbreak was not associated with higher seroprevalence. In multivariable logistic regression, presence of symptomatic contacts in the household was the strongest predictor of seropositivity (adjusted odds ratio 7.15, 95% confidence interval 5.42-9.41). INTERPRETATION: Health care workers exposed to household risk factors were more likely to be seropositive than those not exposed, highlighting the need to emphasize the importance of public health measures both inside and outside of the hospital.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Ontario/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 37(8): 427-434, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254929

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric emergency department (ED) utilization and outcomes. METHODS: This study is an interrupted-time-series observational study of children presenting to 11 Canadian tertiary-care pediatric EDs. Data were grouped into weeks in 3 study periods: prepandemic (January 1, 2018-January 27, 2020), peripandemic (January 28, 2020-March 10, 2020), and early pandemic (March 11, 2020-April 30, 2020). These periods were compared with the same time intervals in the 2 preceding calendar years. Primary outcomes were number of ED visits per week. The secondary outcomes were triage acuity, hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mortality, length of hospital stay, ED revisits, and visits for trauma and mental health concerns. RESULTS: There were 577,807 ED visits (median age, 4.5 years; 52.9% male). Relative to the prepandemic period, there was a reduction [-58%; 95% confidence interval (CI), -63% to -51%] in the number of ED visits during the early-pandemic period, with concomitant higher acuity. There was a concurrent increase in the proportion of ward [odds ratio (OR), 1.39; 95% CI, 1.32-1.45] and intensive care unit (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42) admissions, and trauma-related ED visits among children less than 10 years (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.45-1.56). Mental health-related visits in children declined in the early-pandemic period (in <10 years, -60%; 95% CI, -67% to -51%; in children ≥10 years: -56%; 95% CI, -63% to -47%) relative to the pre-COVID-19 period. There were no differences in mortality or length of stay; however, ED revisits within 72 hours were reduced during the early-pandemic period (percent change: -55%; 95% CI, -61% to -49%; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: After the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic, dramatic reductions in pediatric ED visits occurred across Canada. Children seeking ED care were sicker, and there was an increase in trauma-related visits among children more than 10 years of age, whereas mental health visits declined during the early-pandemic period. When faced with a future pandemic, public health officials must consider the impact of the illness and the measures implemented on children's health and acute care needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Environ Res ; 194: 110645, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996876

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Quantifying the impact of environmental factors on COVID-19 transmission is crucial in preventing more cases. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation and ozone (O3) have reported antimicrobial properties but few studies have examined associations with community infectivity of COVID-19. Research suggests UV light can be preventative while the effect of O3 is contested. We sought to determine the relationship between UV, O3, and COVID-19 incidence in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: In our time series analyses, we calculated daily incidence rates and reproductive number (Rt) from 34,975 cases between January and June 2020 across 34 Ontario Public Health Units. We used generalised linear models, adjusting for potential confounders, to calculate point estimates (PE) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for UV and O3. Analyses were further stratified by age groups and outbreaks at institutions versus community. RESULTS: We found that 1-week averaged UV was significantly associated with a 13% decrease (95% CI: 0.80-0.96) in overall COVID-19 Rt, per unit increase. A negative association with UV was also significant among community outbreaks (PE: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.81-0.96) but not institutional outbreaks (PE: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.85-1.03). A positive association of O3 with COVID-19 incidence is strongly suggested among institutional outbreak cases (PE: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00-1.13). CONCLUSION: Our study found evidence to support the hypothesis that higher UV reduced transmission of COVID-19 and some evidence that ground-level O3 positively influenced COVID-19 transmission. Setting of infection should be strongly considered as a factor in future research. UV and O3 may explain some of COVID-19's seasonal behaviour.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ozone , Humans , Linear Models , Ontario/epidemiology , Ozone/analysis , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Sci Total Environ ; 750: 141484, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693584

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus identified as the cause of COVID-19 and, as the pandemic evolves, many have made parallels to previous epidemics such as SARS-CoV (the cause of an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS]) in 2003. Many have speculated that, like SARS, the activity of SARS-CoV-2 will subside when the climate becomes warmer. We sought to determine the relationship between ambient temperature and COVID-19 incidence in Canada. We analyzed over 77,700 COVID-19 cases from four Canadian provinces (Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec) from January to May 2020. After adjusting for precipitation, wind gust speed, and province in multiple linear regression models, we found a positive, but not statistically significant, association between cumulative incidence and ambient temperature (14.2 per 100,000 people; 95%CI: -0.60-29.0). We also did not find a statistically significant association between total cases or effective reproductive number of COVID-19 and ambient temperature. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that higher temperatures will reduce transmission of COVID-19 and warns the public not to lose vigilance and to continue practicing safety measures such as hand washing, social distancing, and use of facial masks despite the warming climates.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Alberta , Betacoronavirus , British Columbia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Incidence , Ontario , Quebec , SARS-CoV-2 , Temperature
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...