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1.
Eur J Pain ; 2021 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic forced the Spanish government to declare a state of emergency. A stringent lockdown was enforced, restricting access to healthcare services, including chiropractic. Reduced access to care provision in combination with psychological stress, social isolation and physical inactivity during the lockdown were shown to negatively influence pain conditions. However, data on strategies to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on these conditions are lacking. METHODS: Upon easing of restrictions in May 2020, 51 chiropractic clinics throughout Spain pseudo-randomly invited patients, recruiting a total of 385 participants. During a 14-day period, participants were exposed to in-person chiropractic care in either one (n = 177) or multiple encounters (n = 109) or to no care (n = 99). The effects of access to chiropractic care on patients' pain-related and psychological outcomes were assessed online through validated self-reported questionnaires before and after the period of care. Coprimary outcomes included pain intensity, pain interference and pain cognitions. RESULTS: When comparing to participants without access to care, pain intensity and interference were significantly decreased at follow-up, irrespective of the number of encounters. Kinesiophobia was also significantly reduced at follow-up, though only after multiple encounters. The relationship between fear of movement, changes in pain intensity and interference was mediated by catastrophizing. CONCLUSION: Access to in-person chiropractic care may provide pain relief, associated with reductions in interference and pain cognitions. Prioritizing in-person care for patients with maladaptive pain cognitions may help dampen the detrimental consequences of the pandemic on physical and psychological well-being.

2.
Trials ; 22(1): 595, 2021 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398873

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic lower limb ischemia develops earlier and more frequently in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetes remains the main cause of lower-extremity non-traumatic amputations. Current medical treatment, based on antiplatelet therapy and statins, has demonstrated deficient improvement of the disease. In recent years, research has shown that it is possible to improve tissue perfusion through therapeutic angiogenesis. Both in animal models and humans, it has been shown that cell therapy can induce therapeutic angiogenesis, making mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapy one of the most promising therapeutic alternatives. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of cell therapy based on mesenchymal stromal cells derived from adipose tissue intramuscular administration to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with critical limb ischemia and without possibility of revascularization. METHODS: A multicenter, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial has been designed. Ninety eligible patients will be randomly assigned at a ratio 1:1:1 to one of the following: control group (n = 30), low-cell dose treatment group (n = 30), and high-cell dose treatment group (n = 30). Treatment will be administered in a single-dose way and patients will be followed for 12 months. Primary outcome (safety) will be evaluated by measuring the rate of adverse events within the study period. Secondary outcomes (efficacy) will be measured by assessing clinical, analytical, and imaging-test parameters. Tertiary outcome (quality of life) will be evaluated with SF-12 and VascuQol-6 scales. DISCUSSION: Chronic lower limb ischemia has limited therapeutic options and constitutes a public health problem in both developed and underdeveloped countries. Given that the current treatment is not established in daily clinical practice, it is essential to provide evidence-based data that allow taking a step forward in its clinical development. Also, the multidisciplinary coordination exercise needed to develop this clinical trial protocol will undoubtfully be useful to conduct academic clinical trials in the field of cell therapy in the near future. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04466007 . Registered on January 07, 2020. All items from the World Health Organization Trial Registration Data Set are included within the body of the protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Noma , Adipose Tissue , Animals , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Ischemia/diagnosis , Ischemia/therapy , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 668074, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278394

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies on the role of eosinophils in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are scarce, though available findings suggest a possible association with disease severity. Our study analyzes the relationship between eosinophils and COVID-19, with a focus on disease severity and patients with underlying chronic respiratory diseases. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 3018 subjects attended at two public hospitals in Madrid (Spain) with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from January 31 to April 17, 2020. Patients with eosinophil counts less than 0.02×109/L were considered to have eosinopenia. Individuals with chronic respiratory diseases (n=384) were classified according to their particular underlying condition, i.e., asthma, chronic pulmonary obstructive disease, or obstructive sleep apnea. Results: Of the 3018 patients enrolled, 479 were excluded because of lack of information at the time of admission. Of 2539 subjects assessed, 1396 patients presented an eosinophil count performed on admission, revealing eosinopenia in 376 cases (26.93%). Eosinopenia on admission was associated with a higher risk of intensive care unit (ICU) or respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) admission (OR:2.21; 95%CI:1.42-3.45; p<0.001) but no increased risk of mortality (p>0.05). Conclusions: Eosinopenia on admission conferred a higher risk of severe disease (requiring ICU/RICU care), but was not associated with increased mortality. In patients with chronic respiratory diseases who develop COVID-19, age seems to be the main risk factor for progression to severe disease or death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Eosinophils , Lung Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Chronic Disease , Eosinophils/immunology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
5.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 212: 105928, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253267

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Currently, there are no definitive data on the relationship between low levels of vitamin D in the blood and a more severe disease course, in terms of the need for hospital admission, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and mortality, in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We aimed to study the association between levels of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and adverse clinical outcomes linked to SARS-CoV-2 infection. We further aimed to observe the incidence of low, below-average, and normal levels of 25(OH)D in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 between March 12, 2020, and May 20, 2020, and assess whether these values differed between these patients and a normal population. Finally, we determined whether the need for transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) and the mortality rate were related to low levels of 25(OH)D. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective observational study. SETTING: Quironsalud Hospitals in Madrid, Spain. PARTICIPANTS: We analyzed 1549 patients (mean age, 70 years; range, 21-104 years); 835 were male (53.9 %; mean age, 73.02 years), and 714 were female (46.1 %; mean age, 68.05 years). Subsequently, infected patients admitted to the ICU (n = 112) and those with a fatal outcome (n = 324) were analyzed. PROCEDURES: Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured by electrochemiluminescence. RESULTS: More hospitalized patients (66 %, n = 1017) had low baseline levels of 25(OH)D (<20 ng/mL) than normal individuals (45 %) (p < 0.001). An analysis by age group revealed that COVID-19 patients between the ages of 20 and 80 years old had significantly lower vitamin D levels than those of the normal population (p < 0.001). Patients admitted to the ICU tended to have lower levels of 25(OH)D than other inpatients (p < 0.001); if we stratified patients by 25(OH)D levels, we observed that the rate of ICU admission was higher among patients with vitamin D deficiency (p < 0.001), indicating that higher vitamin D levels are associated with a lower risk of ICU admission due to COVID-19. ICU admission was related to sex (higher rates in men, p < 0.001) and age (p < 0.001). When using a logistic regression model, we found that vitamin D levels continued to show a statistically significant relationship with ICU admission rates, even when adjusting for sex and age. Therefore, the relationship found between vitamin D levels and the risk of ICU admission was independent of patient age and sex in both groups. Deceased patients (n = 324 tended to have lower levels of 25 (OH)D that normal population of the same age (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency in patients with COVID-19 is correlated with an increased risk of hospital admission and the need for critical care. We found no clear relationship between vitamin D levels and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/virology , Young Adult
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