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1.
Am J Med Sci ; 364(1): 16-22, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can progress to cardiovascular complications which are linked to higher in-hospital mortality rates. Infective endocarditis (IE) can develop in patients with recent COVID-19 infections, however, characterization of IE following COVID-19 infection has been lacking. To better characterize this disease, we performed a systematic review with descriptive analysis of the clinical features and outcomes of these patients. METHODS: Our search was conducted in 8 databases for all published reports of probable or definite IE in patients with a prior COVID-19 confirmed diagnosis. After ensuring an appropriate inclusion of the articles, we extracted data related to clinical characteristics, modified duke criteria, microbiology, outcomes, and procedures. RESULTS: Searches generated a total of 323 published reports, and 20 articles met our inclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 52.2 ± 16.9 years and 76.2% were males. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 8 (38.1%) patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 3 patients (14.3%) and Streptococcus mitis/oralis in 2 (9.5%) patients. The mean time interval between COVID-19 and IE diagnoses was 16.7 ± 15 days. Six (28.6%) patients required critical care due to IE, 7 patients (33.3%) underwent IE-related cardiac surgery and 5 patients (23.8%) died during their IE hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review provides a profile of clinical features and outcomes of patients with a prior COVID-19 infection diagnosis who subsequently developed IE. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is essential that clinicians appreciate the possibility of IE as a unique complication of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Staphylococcal Infections , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis/epidemiology , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Staphylococcal Infections/complications
2.
J Clin Tuberc Other Mycobact Dis ; 23: 100238, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198877

ABSTRACT

A global multi-disciplinary faculty was established to work collaboratively and provide virtual technical assistance, using a point-of-care continuing education model, to clinicians across the world engaged in the care of patients with either HIV infection or tuberculosis. Ancillary offerings included live or virtual lectures, case-based conferences, and courses. In spite of the considerable disruption of the program due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we engaged and assisted a substantial number of clinicians across the world and provided meaningful contributions to their continuous professional development and patient care. In light of the ongoing pandemic, virtual technical assistance models such as this should be scaled to continue essential high-quality HIV/TB services.

4.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(7): 1420-1425, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-831291

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic in March 2020. A major challenge in this worldwide pandemic has been efficient and effective large-scale testing for the disease. In this communication, we discuss lessons learned in the set up and function of a locally organized drive-through testing facility.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Automobiles , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Elife ; 92020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635065

ABSTRACT

Understanding temporal dynamics of COVID-19 symptoms could provide fine-grained resolution to guide clinical decision-making. Here, we use deep neural networks over an institution-wide platform for the augmented curation of clinical notes from 77,167 patients subjected to COVID-19 PCR testing. By contrasting Electronic Health Record (EHR)-derived symptoms of COVID-19-positive (COVIDpos; n = 2,317) versus COVID-19-negative (COVIDneg; n = 74,850) patients for the week preceding the PCR testing date, we identify anosmia/dysgeusia (27.1-fold), fever/chills (2.6-fold), respiratory difficulty (2.2-fold), cough (2.2-fold), myalgia/arthralgia (2-fold), and diarrhea (1.4-fold) as significantly amplified in COVIDpos over COVIDneg patients. The combination of cough and fever/chills has 4.2-fold amplification in COVIDpos patients during the week prior to PCR testing, in addition to anosmia/dysgeusia, constitutes the earliest EHR-derived signature of COVID-19. This study introduces an Augmented Intelligence platform for the real-time synthesis of institutional biomedical knowledge. The platform holds tremendous potential for scaling up curation throughput, thus enabling EHR-powered early disease diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Chills/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diarrhea/virology , Dysgeusia/virology , Female , Fever/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/virology , Olfaction Disorders/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
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