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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(5): e2110314, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230184

ABSTRACT

Importance: After the emergence of COVID-19, studies reported a decrease in hospitalizations of patients with ischemic stroke (IS), but there are little to no data regarding hospitalizations for the remainder of 2020, including outcome data from a large cohort of patients with IS and comorbid COVID-19. Objective: To assess hospital discharge rates, demographic factors, and outcomes of hospitalization associated with the COVID-19 pandemic among US patients with IS before vs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study used data from the Vizient Clinical Data Base on 324 013 patients with IS at 478 nonfederal hospitals in 43 US states between January 1, 2019, and December 31, 2020. Patients were eligible if they were admitted to the hospital on a nonelective basis and were not receiving hospice care at the time of admission. A total of 41 166 discharged between January and March 2020 were excluded from the analysis because they had unreliable data on COVID-19 status, leaving 282 847 patients for the study. Exposure: Ischemic stroke and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Monthly counts of discharges among patients with IS in 2020. Demographic characteristics and outcomes, including in-hospital death, among patients with IS who were discharged in 2019 (control group) were compared with those of patients with IS with or without comorbid COVID-19 (COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 groups, respectively) who were discharged between April and December 2020. Results: Of the 282 847 patients included in the study, 165 912 (50.7% male; 63.4% White; 26.3% aged ≥80 years) were allocated to the control group; 111 418 of 116 935 patients (95.3%; 51.9% male; 62.8% White; 24.6% aged ≥80 years) were allocated to the non-COVID-19 group and 5517 of 116 935 patients (4.7%; 58.0% male; 42.5% White; 21.3% aged ≥80 years) to the COVID-19 group. A mean (SD) of 13 846 (553) discharges per month among patients with IS was reported in 2019. Discharges began decreasing in February 2020, reaching a low of 10 846 patients in April 2020 before returning to a prepandemic level of 13 639 patients by July 2020. A mean (SD) of 13 492 (554) discharges per month was recorded for the remainder of 2020. Black and Hispanic patients accounted for 21.4% and 7.0% of IS discharges in 2019, respectively, but accounted for 27.5% and 16.0% of those discharged with IS and comorbid COVID-19 in 2020. Compared with patients in the control and non-COVID-19 groups, those in the COVID-19 group were less likely to smoke (16.0% vs 17.2% vs 6.4%, respectively) and to have hypertension (73.0% vs 73.1% vs 68.2%) or dyslipidemia (61.2% vs 63.2% vs 56.6%) but were more likely to have diabetes (39.8% vs 40.5% vs 53.0%), obesity (16.2% vs 18.4% vs 24.5%), acute coronary syndrome (8.0% vs 9.2% vs 15.8%), or pulmonary embolus (1.9% vs 2.4% vs 6.8%) and to require intubation (11.3% vs 12.3% vs 37.6%). After adjusting for baseline factors, patients with IS and COVID-19 were more likely to die in the hospital than were patients with IS in 2019 (adjusted odds ratio, 5.17; 95% CI, 4.83-5.53; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale adjusted odds ratio, 3.57; 95% CI, 3.15-4.05). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, after the emergence of COVID-19, hospital discharges of patients with IS decreased in the US but returned to prepandemic levels by July 2020. Among patients with IS between April and December 2020, comorbid COVID-19 was relatively common, particularly among Black and Hispanic populations, and morbidity was high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/standards , Patients/classification , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patients/statistics & numerical data , /statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology
3.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0248728, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183650

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the outcomes of adult patients with spontaneous intracranial and subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnosed with comorbid COVID-19 infection in a large, geographically diverse cohort. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis using the Vizient Clinical Data Base. We separately compared two cohorts of patients with COVID-19 admitted April 1-October 31, 2020-patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and those with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-with control patients with ICH or SAH who did not have COVID-19 admitted at the same hospitals in 2019. The primary outcome was in-hospital death. Favorable discharge and length of hospital and intensive-care stay were the secondary outcomes. We fit multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression models to our outcomes. RESULTS: There were 559 ICH-COVID patients and 23,378 ICH controls from 194 hospitals. In the ICH-COVID cohort versus controls, there was a significantly higher proportion of Hispanic patients (24.5% vs. 8.9%), Black patients (23.3% vs. 20.9%), nonsmokers (11.5% vs. 3.2%), obesity (31.3% vs. 13.5%), and diabetes (43.4% vs. 28.5%), and patients had a longer hospital stay (21.6 vs. 10.5 days), a longer intensive-care stay (16.5 vs. 6.0 days), and a higher in-hospital death rate (46.5% vs. 18.0%). Patients with ICH-COVID had an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 2.43 [1.96-3.00] for the outcome of death and an aOR of 0.55 [0.44-0.68] for favorable discharge. There were 212 SAH-COVID patients and 5,029 controls from 119 hospitals. The hospital (26.9 vs. 13.4 days) and intensive-care (21.9 vs. 9.6 days) length of stays and in-hospital death rate (42.9% vs. 14.8%) were higher in the SAH-COVID cohort compared with controls. Patients with SAH-COVID had an aOR of 1.81 [1.26-2.59] for an outcome of death and an aOR of 0.54 [0.37-0.78] for favorable discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with spontaneous ICH or SAH and comorbid COVID infection were more likely to be a racial or ethnic minority, diabetic, and obese and to have higher rates of death and longer hospital length of stay when compared with controls.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/therapy , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/mortality , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
4.
Neurology ; 96(4): e647-e649, 2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1048799
6.
Neurology ; 95(9): 404-407, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606934

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has changed the way we engage patient care, with a move toward telemedicine-based health care encounters. Teleneurology is now being rapidly embraced by neurologists in clinics and hospitals nationwide but for many, this paradigm of care is unfamiliar. Exposure to telemedicine in neurology training programs is scarce despite previous calls to expand teleneurology education. Programs that provide a teleneurology curriculum have demonstrated increased proficiency, accuracy, and post-training utilization among their trainees. With the current changes in health care, broad incorporation of teleneurology education in resident and fellow training after this pandemic dissipates will only serve to improve trainee preparedness for independent practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Neurologists , Pandemics , Videoconferencing
7.
Neurology ; 95(3): 124-133, 2020 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-209566

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic requires drastic changes in allocation of resources, which can affect the delivery of stroke care, and many providers are seeking guidance. As caregivers, we are guided by 3 distinct principles that will occasionally conflict during the pandemic: (1) we must ensure the best care for those stricken with COVID-19, (2) we must provide excellent care and advocacy for patients with cerebrovascular disease and their families, and (3) we must advocate for the safety of health care personnel managing patients with stroke, with particular attention to those most vulnerable, including trainees. This descriptive review by a diverse group of experts in stroke care aims to provide advice by specifically addressing the potential impact of this pandemic on (1) the quality of the stroke care delivered, (2) ethical considerations in stroke care, (3) safety and logistic issues for providers of patients with stroke, and (4) stroke research. Our recommendations on these issues represent our best opinions given the available information, but are subject to revision as the situation related to the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve. We expect that ongoing emergent research will offer additional insights that will provide evidence that could prompt the modification or removal of some of these recommendations.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Needs and Demand , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Stroke/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Ethics, Medical , Health Care Rationing/ethics , Health Resources , Health Services Accessibility , Hospital Bed Capacity , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Neurology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine
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