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1.
Geriatr Gerontol Int ; 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752550

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate whether the type and frequency of social interaction during the state of emergency due to coronavirus disease were associated with self-rated health (SRH) after the state of emergency. METHODS: Data from a cross-sectional study were collected for 889 oldest-old adults in Bibai City, Hokkaido, Japan. In total, 612 participants (mean age: 83.0 ± 4.3 years; women: 51.8%) were included in the analysis, taking biological sex into account. The self-reported questionnaire included questions about demographic variables, SRH (July 2020, after the emergency), and the type and frequency of social interaction (March 2020, during the state of emergency). RESULTS: There was no significant association between social interaction and SRH in men (P > 0.05). Women who had social interactions (both face-to-face and non-face-to-face) more than once a week during the state of emergency reported higher SRH after the emergency than those who did not (odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.07-4.41). CONCLUSIONS: Having both types of interaction more than once a week during the state of emergency was related to higher SRH after the emergency among oldest-old women. It is suggested that having opportunities for both types of interaction at least once a week would potentially be beneficial for high SRH in women, even in situations where the declaration of a state of emergency restricts face-to-face interaction. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2022; ••: ••-••.

2.
Pain Manag Nurs ; 2022 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Poor sleep quality has a negative effect on pain among older adults. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) state of emergency, lifestyle changes can cause psychologic stressors and lead to poor sleep quality. AIM: This study examined whether sleep quality status was associated with low back or knee pain changes during the COVID-19 state of emergency among community-dwelling Japanese old-old adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional investigation. METHODS: In July 2020, during the COVID-19 epidemic, we conducted a postal survey for old-old adults aged ≥77 years and collected data on 597 participants. For those who had low back or knee pain at the time of the survey (in July), characteristics such as low back pain, knee pain, changes in pain status, and sleep quality status during the COVID-19 state of emergency (in March) were assessed. RESULTS: Data from 597 participants showed the prevalence of low back pain (50.6%) and knee pain (40.7%) in July. Of those with low back or knee pain, 374 had pain changes during the state of emergency, with 12.3% worsening. Of these, 23.9% had poor sleep quality in March compared to non-change (p = .008). In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with pain worsening (odds ratio 2.80, 95% confidence interval 1.26-6.22). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 state of emergency, poor sleep quality was associated with worsening low back or knee pain. This may indicate the need to pay attention to poor sleep quality to prevent the exacerbation of pain among old-old adults.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 Jan 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625376

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent longitudinal studies have reported proportion of frailty transition in older individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our study aimed at clarifying the impact of social frailty in community-dwelling older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic and at identifying factors that can predict transition to social frailty. METHODS: We performed this study from 2019 (before declaration of the state of emergency over the rising number of COVID-19 cases) to 2020 (after declaration of the emergency). We applied Makizako's social frail index to our study subjects at the baseline and classified into robust, social prefrailty, and social frailty groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed using robust, social prefrailty, or social frailty status as dependent variable. RESULTS: Analysis by the Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant differences in the score on the GDS-15 among the robust, social prefrailty, and social frailty groups (p < 0.05). Furthermore, multiple regression analysis identified a significant association between the social frailty status and the score on GDS-15 (odds ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.15-2.13; p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The increase in the rate of transition of elderly individuals to the social frailty group could have been related to the implementation of the stay-at-home order as part of the countermeasures for COVID-19. Furthermore, the increased prevalence of depressive symptoms associated with the stay-at-home order could also have influenced the increase in the prevalence of social frailty during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , Depression/epidemiology , Frail Elderly , Frailty/epidemiology , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Independent Living , Pandemics , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Pain management nursing : official journal of the American Society of Pain Management Nurses ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1615291

ABSTRACT

Purpose Poor sleep quality has a negative effect on pain among older adults. During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) state of emergency, lifestyle changes can cause psychological stressors and lead to poor sleep quality. This study examined whether sleep quality status was associated with low back or knee pain changes during the COVID-19 state of emergency among community-dwelling Japanese old-old adults. Design Cross-sectional investigation. Methods In July 2020, during the COVID-19 epidemic, we conducted a postal survey for old-old adults aged ≥77 years and collected data on 597 participants. For those who had low back or knee pain at the time of the survey (in July), characteristics such as low back pain, knee pain, changes in pain status, and sleep quality status during the COVID-19 state of emergency (in March) were assessed. Results Data from 597 participants showed the prevalence of low back pain (50.6%) and knee pain (40.7%) in July. Of those with low back or knee pain, 374 had pain changes during the state of emergency, with 12.3% worsening. Of these, 23.9% had poor sleep quality in March compared to non-change (p=0.008). In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with pain worsening (odds ratio 2.80, 95% confidence interval 1.26–6.22). Conclusions During the COVID-19 state of emergency, poor sleep quality was associated with worsening low back or knee pain. This may indicate the need to pay attention to poor sleep quality to prevent the exacerbation of pain among old-old adults.

5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27533, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501206

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Understanding the relationship between pain and physical activity (PA) levels is beneficial for maintaining good health status. However, the impact of pain on changes in PA during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine whether PA levels pre-, during, and post-COVID-19 state of emergency differ between Japanese adults who had pain after the COVID-19 state of emergency and those who did not.Data were collected from a cross-sectional online survey conducted between October 19 and 28, 2020. The analytic sample consisted of 1967 Japanese adults aged ≥40 years who completed the online survey. Participants completed questionnaires on the presence of pain and duration of PA, defined as the total PA time per week based on activity frequency and time. Participants were asked to report their PA at 3 time points: October 2019 (before the COVID-19 pandemic), April 2020 (during the COVID-19 state of emergency), and October 2020 (after the COVID-19 state of emergency).Among participants aged ≥60 years who reported pain in October 2020, the total PA time was significantly lower than participants who did not report having pain. Furthermore, the total PA time in April 2020 was significantly lower than that in October 2019; however, no significant difference in total PA time was observed between April and October 2020. Among participants aged 40 to 59 years, no significant differences were observed in total PA times at the 3 time points between those with and without pain. In addition, the total PA time in October 2020 significantly increased compared to that in April 2020, although it significantly decreased in April 2020 compared to October 2019.This study suggests that older adults with pain have lower PA levels after the COVID-19 state of emergency.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Pain/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468399

ABSTRACT

Regular exercise may be associated with better self-rated health and sleep status. However, this correlation among various age groups, such as young, middle-aged, and older people, as well as during the COVID-19 pandemic, has not been examined. This study examined the correlation between regular exercise and self-rated health and sleep quality among adults in Japan during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected using an online survey conducted between February 26 and 27, 2021. A total of 1410 adults in Japan (age range, 20-86 years) completed the online survey. Regular exercise was divided into: (1) more than 30 min of moderate exercise a day, (2) more than 2 days per week, and (3) continuous for 1 year or longer. Self-rated health and sleep quality were assessed using the Likert scale. After adjusting for multiple confounders, regular exercise was correlated with decreased poor self-rated health and poor sleep quality in middle-aged adults; however, no significant correlation was observed among young and older adults. The promotion of regular exercise among middle-aged people during the COVID-19 pandemic may contribute to better self-rated health and sleep quality status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Exercise , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Young Adult
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217087

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an abrupt change in lifestyle for many people with restrictions, often leading to a decrease in physical activity (PA), and thus contributing to a negative perception of health status. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the COVID-19 epidemic on physical activity and perceived physical fitness in Japanese adults aged 40 to 69 years. Data were collected from an online survey conducted between October 19 and 28, 2020. The analytic sample consisted of 1989 Japanese adults (mean age, 50.1 ± 6.9 years; women, 38.9%) who were aged between 40 and 69 years and completed the online survey. Overall, the PA time per week decreased by 32.4% between October 2019 and April 2020. A decrease in PA time was recorded in October 2020; however, a decline of 15.5% was observed. Compared to individuals who did not perceive a decline in physical fitness, individuals who perceived declining physical fitness during the COVID-19 state of emergency demonstrated a greater decrease in PA time in April 2020 (-50.5%), and this trend continued into October 2020 (-25.0%). These findings may indicate that Japanese adults aged 40 to 69 years who perceived declining physical fitness experienced a greater decrease in physical activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Exercise , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Physical Fitness , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090333

ABSTRACT

Health literacy is important for promoting and maintaining good health in old-old adults. It may influence the implementation of exercise in the coronavirus disease epidemic. The present cross-sectional study investigated the association of each dimension of health literacy with the implementation of exercise during the declaration of a state of emergency due to coronavirus disease in community-dwelling old-old adults. We collected data from 483 community-dwelling old-old adults (52.8% women) aged between 77 and 99 years who participated in a mail survey. Participants were divided into exercise or nonexercise groups based on the implementation of exercise during the declaration of a state of emergency. Health literacy was assessed using a 14-item health literacy scale. There were 327 (67.7%) participants in the exercise group and 156 (32.3%) in the nonexercise group. A significantly higher score of health literacy was observed in the exercise group than in the nonexercise group (communicative health literacy score = 14.0 ± 3.6 vs. 12.7 ± 3.8, p = 0.001). In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders, high communicative health literacy scores were significantly associated with the implementation of exercise during the declaration of a state of emergency (odds ratio = 1.88, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-2.93). Approximately two-thirds of community-dwelling old-old adults implement exercise during the declaration of a state of emergency. High communicative health literacy was associated with the implementation of exercise during this period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Health Literacy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Independent Living , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics
11.
Geriatr Gerontol Int ; 21(4): 364-369, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082744

ABSTRACT

AIM: Perceived health status, including physical and cognitive fitness, will be negatively associated with future health conditions among old-old adults. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused sudden changes in lifestyle. Thus, this study examined the associations of participation in an exercise class before the COVID-19 pandemic and the exercise habits and disruption to the rhythms of daily life during the COVID-19 state of emergency with perceived declining physical and cognitive fitness among community-dwelling old-old adults. METHODS: In July 2020, we carried out a mail survey of community-dwelling old-old adults aged between 77 and 99 years in Bibai, Hokkaido, Japan, to determine their perceived declining physical and cognitive fitness during the COVID-19 state of emergency. RESULTS: Of the 774 responders, 339 (43.8%) participants reported a decline in physical fitness, whereas 259 (33.5%) perceived declining cognitive fitness during the COVID-19 state of emergency. In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders, exercise habits during the COVID-19 state of emergency were significantly associated with a lower perception of declining physical fitness. Disruption to the rhythms of daily life during the COVID-19 state of emergency was significantly associated with a higher perception of declining physical and cognitive fitness. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately half and more than one-third of community-dwelling old-old adults perceived declining physical and cognitive fitness, respectively, during the COVID-19 state of emergency. During this period, exercise habits were positively correlated with perceived health status among old-old adults, whereas disruption to the rhythms of daily life was negatively correlated. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2021; 21: 364-369.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Exercise , Health Status , Physical Fitness , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Independent Living , Japan , Male , Self Report
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