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1.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 14: 1161637, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323988

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Diabetes is one of the comorbidities associated with poor prognosis in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. In this nationwide retrospective study, we evaluated the risk of in-hospital death attributed to diabetes. Methods: We analyzed data from discharge reports of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in 2020 as submitted to the Polish National Health Fund. Several multivariate logistic regression models were used. In each model, in-hospital death was estimated with explanatory variables. Models were built either on the whole cohorts or cohorts matched with propensity score matching (PSM). The models examined either the main effects of diabetes itself or the interaction of diabetes with other variables. Results: We included 174,621 patients with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in the year 2020. Among them, there were 40,168 diabetic patients (DPs), and the proportion of DPs in this group was higher than in the general population (23.0% vs. 9.5%, p<0.001). In this group of COVID-19 hospitalizations, 17,438 in-hospital deaths were recorded, and the mortality was higher among DPs than non-diabetics (16.3% vs. 8.1%, p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regressions showed that diabetes was a risk factor of death, regardless of sex and age. In the main effect analysis, odds of in-hospital death were higher by 28.3% for DPs than for non-diabetic patients. Similarly, PSM analysis including 101,578 patients, of whom 19,050 had diabetes, showed that the risk of death was higher in DPs regardless of sex with odds higher by 34.9%. The impact of diabetes differed among age groups and was the highest for patients aged 60-69. Conclusions: This nationwide study confirmed that diabetes was an independent risk factor of in-hospital death in the course of COVID-19 infection. However, the relative risk differed across the age groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Poland/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Risk Factors
2.
Ginekol Pol ; 94(5): 389-394, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305695

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The medical care of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during the COVID-19 pandemic was influenced by changing epidemiological conditions and government regulations. Aim - To compare the clinical pregnancy data of GDM women between waves I and III of the pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records from the GDM clinic and compared the periods of March-May 2020 (wave I) and March-May 2021 (wave III). RESULTS: Women with GDM during wave I (n = 119) compared to wave III (n = 116) were older (33.0 ± 4.7 vs 32.1 ± 4.8 years; p = 0.07), booked later (21.8 ± 8.4 vs 20.3 ± 8.5 weeks; p = 0.17), and had their last appointment earlier (35.5 ± 2.0 vs 35.7 ± 3.2 weeks; p < 0.01). Telemedicine consultations were used more frequently during wave I (46.8% vs 24.1%; p < 0.01), while insulin therapy was used less often (64.7% vs 80.2%; p < 0.01). Mean fasting self-measured glucose did not differ (4.8 ± 0.3 vs 4.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L; p = 0.49), but higher postprandial glucose was reported during wave I (6.6 ± 0.9 vs 6.3 ± 0.6 mmol/l; p < 0.01). Pregnancy outcome data were available for 77 wave I pregnancies and 75 wave III pregnancies. The groups were similar in terms of gestational week of delivery (38.3 ± 1.4 vs 38.1 ± 1.6 weeks), cesarean sections (58.4% vs 61.3%), APGAR scores (9.7 ± 1.0 vs 9.7 ± 1.0 pts), and birth weights (3306.6 ± 457.6 g vs 3243.9 ± 496.8 g) (p = NS for all). The mean wave I neonate length was slightly higher (54.3 ± 2.6 cm vs 53.3 ± 2.6 cm; p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: We identified differences between wave I and wave III pregnancies for several clinical characteristics. However, nearly all pregnancy outcomes were found to be similar.


Subject(s)
Diabetes, Gestational , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Glycemic Control , Pregnancy Outcome , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Diabetes, Gestational/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Blood Glucose , Adult
3.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 10: 1133373, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283820

ABSTRACT

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with increasing prevalence with respect to age and comorbidities. AF may influence the prognosis in patients hospitalized with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to assess the prevalence of AF among patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 and the association of AF and in-hospital anticoagulation treatment with prognosis. Methods and results: We assessed the prevalence of AF among patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 and the association of AF and in-hospital anticoagulation treatment with prognosis. Data of all COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the University Hospital in Krakow, Poland, between March 2020 and April 2021, were analyzed. The following outcomes: short-term (30-days since hospital admission) and long-term (180-days after hospital discharge) mortality, major cardiovascular events (MACEs), pulmonary embolism, and need for red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion, as a surrogate for major bleeding events during hospital stay were assessed. Out of 4,998 hospitalized patients, 609 had AF (535 pre-existing and 74 de novo). Compared to those without AF, patients with AF were older and had more cardiovascular disorders. In adjusted analysis, AF was independently associated with an increased risk of short-term {p = 0.019, Hazard Ratio [(HR)] 1.236; 95% CI: 1.035-1.476} and long-term mortality (Log-rank p < 0.001) as compared to patients without AF. The use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in AF patients was associated with reduced short-term mortality (HR 0.14; 95% CI: 0.06-0.33, p < 0.001). Moreover, in AF patients, NOAC use was associated with a lower probability of MACEs (Odds Ratio 0.3; 95% CI: 0.10-0.89, p = 0.030) without increase of RBCs transfusion. Conclusions: AF increases short- and long-term risk of death in patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. However, the use of NOACs in this group may profoundly improve prognosis.

4.
Int J Endocrinol ; 2023: 8700302, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265435

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes is a risk factor for a severe course of COVID-19. We evaluated the characteristics and risk factors associated with undesirable outcomes in diabetic patients (DPs) hospitalized due to COVID-19. Materials and Methods: The data analysis of patients admitted between March 6, 2020, and May 31, 2021, to the University Hospital in Krakow (Poland), a reference center for COVID-19, was performed. The data were gathered from their medical records. Results: A total number of 5191 patients were included, of which 2348 (45.2%) were women. The patients were at the median age of 64 (IQR: 51-74) years, and 1364 (26.3%) were DPs. DPs, compared to nondiabetics, were older (median age: 70 years, IQR: 62-77 vs. 62, IQR: 47-72, and p < 0.001) and had a similar gender distribution. The DP group had a higher mortality rate (26.2% vs. 15.7%, p < 0.001) and longer hospital stays (median: 15 days, IQR: 10-24 vs. 13, IQR: 9-20, and p < 0.001). DPs were admitted to the ICU more frequently (15.7% vs. 11.0%, p < 0.001) and required mechanical ventilation more often (15.5% vs. 11.3%, p < 0.001). In a multivariate logistic regression, factors associated with a higher risk of death were age >65 years, glycaemia >10 mmol/L, CRP and D-dimer level, prehospital insulin and loop diuretic use, presence of heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Factors contributing to lower mortality were in-hospital use of statin, thiazide diuretic, and calcium channel blocker. Conclusion: In this large COVID-19 cohort, DPs constituted more than a quarter of hospitalized patients. The risk of death and other outcomes compared to nondiabetics was higher in this group. We identified a number of clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic variables associated with the risk of hospital death in DPs.

5.
J Diabetes Complications ; 37(1): 108379, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2180331

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 has brought many challenges for providing quality healthcare for type 1 diabetes (T1DM). We evaluated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the medical care, glycemic control, and selected outcomes in T1DM patients. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed medical records from 357 T1DM adults enrolled in the Program of Comprehensive Outpatient Specialist Care at the University Hospital in Krakow, and assessed differences in patient data from before the COVID-19 period (March 2019-February 2020) and after it started COVID-19 (March 2020-February 2021). RESULTS: The median HbA1c levels and the percentage of patients within the HbA1c target of <7 % (53 mmol/mol) were similar in both periods: before and after the beginning of the pandemic (6.86 % [51.5 mmol/mol], IQR 6.23-7.58 % [44.6-59.3 mmol/mol] vs. 6.9 % [51.9 mmol/mol], IQR 6.2-7.61 % [44.3-59.7 mmol/mol]; p = 0.50 and 56.3 % vs. 57.1 %, p = 0.42, respectively). However, we observed a rise in BMI and body weight (median 24.25, IQR 21.97-27.05 vs. 24.82, IQR 22.17-27.87 and median weight 71.0 IQR 61-82 vs. 72.55, IQR 55-85; p < 0.001 for both comparisons). There was no reduction in the numbers of total diabetes-related visits (median 4, IQR 4-5 vs. 5, IQR 4-5; p = 0.065), but the frequency of other specialist consultations decreased (2, IQR 0-2 vs. 1, IQR 0-2). During the pandemic, telehealth visits constituted of 1191 out of 1609 (71.6 %) total visits. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-center observation, the COVID-19 pandemic did not have a negative impact on glycemic control in T1DM patients, but the patients' weight did increase. Telemedicine proved to be a valuable tool for T1DM care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Adult , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Retrospective Studies , Glycated Hemoglobin , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome , Ambulatory Care
6.
Journal of diabetes and its complications ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2147369

ABSTRACT

Purpose COVID-19 has brought many challenges for providing quality healthcare for type 1 diabetes (T1DM). We evaluated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the medical care, glycemic control, and selected outcomes in T1DM patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed medical records from 357 T1DM adults enrolled in the Program of Comprehensive Outpatient Specialist Care at the University Hospital in Krakow, and assessed differences in patient data from before the COVID-19 period (March 2019–February 2020) and after it started COVID-19 (March 2020–February 2021). Results The median HbA1c levels and the percentage of patients within the HbA1c target of <7 % (53 mmol/mol) were similar in both periods: before and after the beginning of the pandemic (6.86 % [51.5 mmol/mol], IQR 6.23–7.58 % [44.6–59.3 mmol/mol] vs. 6.9 % [51.9 mmol/mol], IQR 6.2–7.61 % [44.3–59.7 mmol/mol];p = 0.50 and 56.3 % vs. 57.1 %, p = 0.42, respectively). However, we observed a rise in BMI and body weight (median 24.25, IQR 21.97–27.05 vs. 24.82, IQR 22.17–27.87 and median weight 71.0 IQR 61–82 vs. 72.55, IQR 55–85;p < 0.001 for both comparisons). There was no reduction in the numbers of total diabetes-related visits (median 4, IQR 4–5 vs. 5, IQR 4–5;p = 0.065), but the frequency of other specialist consultations decreased (2, IQR 0–2 vs. 1, IQR 0–2). During the pandemic, telehealth visits constituted of 1191 out of 1609 (71.6 %) total visits. Conclusions In this single-center observation, the COVID-19 pandemic did not have a negative impact on glycemic control in T1DM patients, but the patients' weight did increase. Telemedicine proved to be a valuable tool for T1DM care.

7.
Pol Arch Intern Med ; 132(10)2022 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091285

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The course of consecutive COVID­19 waves was influenced by medical and organizational factors. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the outcomes of patients hospitalized for COVID­19 during the first 3 waves of the pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of all COVID­19 patients admitted to the University Hospital in Kraków, Poland, a designated COVID­19 hospital in Malopolska province, between March 1, 2020 and May 31, 2021. The waves were defined as 1, 2, and 3, and covered the periods of March 2020 to July 2020, August 2020 to January 2021, and February 2021 to May 2021, respectively. Patients' characteristics and outcomes for waves 1 through 3 were compared. RESULTS: Data analyses included 5191 patients with COVID­19. We found differences in age (mean [SD], 60.2 [17.3] years vs 62.4 [16.8] years vs 61.9 [16.1] years, respectively, for waves 1, 2, and 3; P = 0.003), sex distribution (proportion of women, 51.4% vs 44.2% vs 43.6%; P = 0.003), as well as concentrations of inflammatory markers and oxygen saturation (the lowest and the highest for wave 1, respectively; P <0.001). Hospital death rates in subsequent waves were 10.4%, 19.8%, and 20.3% (P <0.001). Despite similarities in patients' characteristics, the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay was shorter for wave 3 than for wave 2. The risk factors for in­hospital death were: advanced age, male sex, cardiovascular or chronic kidney disease, higher C­reactive protein level, and hospitalization during the second or third wave. CONCLUSIONS: We identified differences in patients' clinical characteristics and outcomes between consecutive pandemic waves, which probably reflect changes in terms of COVID­19 isolation policy, hospitalization and treatment indications, and treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Humans , Male , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, University , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Poland/epidemiology , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged
8.
Hypertension ; 79(11): 2601-2610, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020594

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases including arterial hypertension are common comorbidities among patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. We assessed the influence of preexisting hypertension and its pharmacological treatment on in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. METHODS: We studied all consecutive patients who were admitted to the University Hospital in Krakow, Poland, due to COVID-19 between March 2020 and May 2021. Data of 5191 patients (mean age 61.9±16.7 years, 45.2% female) were analyzed. RESULTS: The median hospitalization time was 14 days, and the mortality rate was 18.4%. About a quarter of patients had an established cardiovascular disease including coronary artery disease (16.6%) or stroke (7.6%). Patients with hypertension (58.3%) were older and had more comorbidities than patients without hypertension. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, age above median (64 years), male gender, history of heart failure or chronic kidney disease, and higher C-reactive protein level, but not preexisting hypertension, were independent risk factors for in-hospital death in the whole study group. Patients with hypertension already treated (n=1723) with any first-line antihypertensive drug (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or thiazide/thiazide-like diuretics) had a significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio, 0.25 [95% CI, 0.2-0.3]; P<0.001) compared to nontreated hypertensives (n=1305). CONCLUSIONS: Although the diagnosis of preexisting hypertension per se had no significant impact on in-hospital mortality among patients with COVID-19, treatment with any first-line blood pressure-lowering drug had a profound beneficial effect on survival in patients with hypertension. These data support the need for antihypertensive pharmacological treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Hypertension , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Pandemics , Hospital Mortality , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/chemically induced , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Thiazides/therapeutic use , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Hospitalization
9.
Diabetes ; 71, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1923969

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Diabetes is a risk factor for severe COVID-course. In this one-center report, we assessed clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with unfavorable outcomes in diabetic patients (DP) hospitalized due to COVID-19. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from a cohort of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV2 infection admitted to the University Hospital in Krakow (Poland) , a regional reference center for COVID-19, between March 6th 2020 and May 15th 2021. The data was collected from electronic medical records. Results: We included 5191 patients, mean age 61.98±16.66 years, 2348 (45.2%) women, 1364 (26.3%) DP. DP were older as compared to non-diabetics (median age 70 vs. 62 years, IQR 62-77 and 47-72, p<0.001) with similar gender distribution. DP were characterized by higher mortality (26.4% vs. 15.6%, p<0.001) , longer hospital stay (median 15 vs. 13 days, IQR 10-24 and 9-20, p<0.001) , more frequent ICU admission (15.7% vs. 11%, p<0.001) and more frequent requirement for mechanical ventilation (15.5% vs. 11.3%, p<0.001) . When adjusted for sex and age, the relative risk for in-hospital death, ICU admission and mechanical ventilation was 1.32 (95%CI 1.13-1.54) , 1.4 (95%CI 1.17-1.69) and 1.3 (95%CI 1.08-1.57) , respectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed age, CRP and D-dimer level, history of heart failure, and loop diuretic use were associated with higher risk of death, whereas anticoagulation therapy, ACEI/sartan/mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist use and thiazide use were associated with lower risk. Conclusions: In this large COVID-cohort, DP constituted more than one fourth of hospitalized patients. Their risk of death was ca. 30% higher as compared to non-diabetics, as was the risk of other important clinical outcomes. We identified a number of clinical, laboratory and therapeutical variables associated with risk of hospital death in DP with COVID-19.

10.
Pol Arch Intern Med ; 132(7-8)2022 08 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1836208

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: High­sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT­ proBNP) are known markers of cardiac injury. However, their role in predicting the severity of COVID­19 remains to be investigated. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to analyze the association between hs­cTnT and NT-proBNP levels and in hospital mortality in patients with COVID­19, with emphasis on those with concomitant chronic heart failure (CHF). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 1729 consecutive patients with COVID­19 were enrolled. Demographic data, laboratory parameters, and clinical outcomes (discharge or death) were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between hs­cTnT and NT-proBNP values and the risk of death. RESULTS: Evaluation of hs­cTnT was performed in 1041 patients, while NT-proBNP was assessed in 715 individuals. CHF was present in 179 cases (10.4% of the cohort). Median values of hs­cTnT and NT-proBNP and in­hospital mortality were higher in CHF patients than in those without CHF. Among patients without CHF, mortality was the highest in those with hs­cTnT or NT-proBNP values in the fourth quartile. In ROC analysis, hs­cTnT equal to or above 142 ng/l and NT-proBNP equal to or above 969 pg/ml predicted in­hospital death. In patients without CHF, each 10-ng/l increase in hs-cTnT or 100-pg/ml increase in NT­proBNP was associated with a higher risk of death (odds ratio [OR], 1.01 and OR, 1.02, respectively; P <0.01 for both). CONCLUSION: The level of hs­cTnT or NT-proBNP predicts in hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. Both hs­cTnT and NT-proBNP should be routinely measured on admission in all patients hospitalized due to COVID­19 for early detection of individuals with an increased risk of in hospital death, even if they do not have concomitant heart failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Biomarkers , Chronic Disease , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain , ROC Curve
11.
Folia Med Cracov ; 61(4): 5-44, 2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700594

ABSTRACT

The complex course of the COVID-19 and the distant complications of the SARS-CoV-2 infection still remain an unfaded challenge for modern medicine. The care of patients with the symptomatic course of COVID-19 exceeds the competence of a single specialty, often requiring a multispecialist approach. The CRACoV-HHS (CRAcow in CoVid pandemic - Home, Hospital and Staff) project has been developed by a team of scientists and clinicians with the aim of optimizing medical care at hospital and ambulatory settings and treatment of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The CRACoV project integrates 26 basic and clinical research from multiple medical disciplines, involving different populations infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus and exposed to infection. Between January 2021 and April 2022 we plan to recruit subjects among patients diagnosed and treated in the University Hospital in Cracow, the largest public hospital in Poland, i.e. 1) patients admitted to the hospital due to COVID-19 [main module: 'Hospital']; 2) patients with signs of infection who have been confirmed as having SARS-CoV-2 infection and have been referred to home isolation due to their mild course (module: 'Home isolation'); 3) patients with symptoms of infection and high exposure to SARS- CoV-2 who have a negative RT-PCR test result. In addition, survey in various professional groups of hospital employees, both medical and non-medical, and final-fifth year medical students (module: 'Staff') is planned. The project carries both scientific and practical dimension and is expected to develop a multidisciplinary model of care of COVID-19 patients as well as recommendations for the management of particular groups of patients including: asymptomatic patient or with mild symptoms of COVID-19; symptomatic patients requiring hospitalization due to more severe clinical course of disease and organ complications; patient requiring surgery; patient with diabetes; patient requiring psychological support; patient with undesirable consequences of pharmacological treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Brain Sci ; 12(2)2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667051

ABSTRACT

We aimed to search whether neurological symptoms or signs (NSS) and the MEWS (Modified Early Warning Score) score were associated with in-hospital mortality or oxygen requirement during the first 14 days of hospitalization in COVID-19 patients recruited at the University Hospital in Krakow, Poland. The detailed clinical questionnaires on twenty NSS were either filled out by patients prospectively or retrospectively assessed by neurologists based on daily medical records. NSS were considered high or low-risk if they were associated with increased or decreased mortality in the univariable analysis. This cohort study included 349 patients with COVID-19 (median age 64, interquartile range (51-77), women 54.72%). The presence of high-risk NSS (decreased level of consciousness, delirium, seizures, and symptoms of stroke or transient ischemic attack) or its combination with the absence of low-risk NSS (headache, dizziness, decreased mood, and fatigue) increased the risk of in-hospital mortality in SARS-CoV-2 infection 3.13 and 7.67-fold, respectively. The presence of low-risk NSS decreased the risk of in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients more than 6-fold. Death in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, apart from NSS, was predicted by older age, neoplasm, and higher MEWS scores on admission. High-risk NSS or their combination with the absence of low-risk NSS increased the risk of oxygen requirement during hospitalization in COVID-19 patients 4.48 and 1.86-fold, respectively. Independent predictors of oxygen therapy during hospitalization in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were also older age, male sex, neoplasm, and higher MEWS score on admission.

13.
Kardiol Pol ; 79(7-8): 773-780, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) recently became one of the leading causes of death worldwide, similar to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Coexisting CVD may influence the prognosis of patients with COVID-19. AIMS: We analyzed the impact of CVD and the use of cardiovascular drugs on the in-hospital course and mortality of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively studied data for consecutive patients admitted to our hospital, with COVID-19 between March 6th and October 15th, 2020. RESULTS: 1729 patients (median interquartile range age 63 [50-75] years; women 48.8%) were included. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 12.9%. The most prevalent CVD was arterial hypertension (56.1%), followed by hyperlipidemia (27.4%), diabetes mellitus (DM) (25.7%), coronary artery disease (16.8%), heart failure (HF) (10.3%), atrial fibrillation (13.5%), and stroke (8%). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEIs/ARBs) were used in 25.0% of patients, ß-blockers in 40.7%, statins in 15.6%, and antiplatelet therapy in 19.9%. Age over 65 years (odds ratio [OR], 6.4; 95% CI, 4.3-9.6), male sex (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-2.0), pre-existing DM (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.1), and HF (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.5-3.5) were independent predictors of in-hospital death, whereas treatment with ACEIs/ARBs (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3-0.6), ß-blockers (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9), statins (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.8), or antiplatelet therapy (OR, 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) was associated with lower risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Among cardiovascular risk factors and diseases, HF and DM appeared to increase in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, whereas the use of cardiovascular drugs was associated with lower mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Agents , Cardiovascular Diseases , Hypertension , Aged , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Psychiatr Pol ; 55(3): 511-523, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English, Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395318

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Assessment of mental state of patients with T1DM - the level of anxiety, stress and general mental health in the stressful conditions of an epidemic. Moreover, it was checked whether the stress response to the epidemic in the T1DM group differed from that in the control group. This is the first study to address these questions in the type 1 diabetes population in Poland. METHODS: An e-mail was sent to all T1DM patients under the care of a diabetes clinic with information about the possibility of online consultation with a psychologist / psychiatrist, with a set of psychological tests attached. The study included 49 patients with T1DM who responded within the first month and agreed to participate in the study. 38 people from the control group were randomly recruited. Each person completed a set of psychological tools. RESULTS: In both groups, the level of stress was higher than typical for the general population in the situation without stressor. T1DM patients who have been ill for over 10 years more often cope with stress through a task-oriented approach. Patients who have been ill for less than 10 years use avoidance strategies. In the first phase of the epidemic,women with T1DM used avoidance strategies. Patients with diabetes and mental disorders react more anxiously and thus require special care in coping with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: In a situation of stress such as a epidemic, patients suffering from T1DM require optimization of treatment and cooperation of specialists in the field of diabetes and psychology / psychiatry.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Diabetes ; 70, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1362286

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a rapid adaptation of healthcare services to secure medical care for many patients' groups. This includes women with Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We evaluated the impacts of the first COVID-19 wave on parameters such as the GDM treatment, glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes. In this retrospective study from a reference diabetes centre (Krakow, Poland), we compared patient data from two different time periods: the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020 - June 2020) and the preceding five months (October 2019 - February 2020). Data was collected from the medical records and telephone surveys. No patient was diagnosed with concomitant COVID-19. We included 155 women - Group 1 N=73 and Group 2 N= 82 from the COVID-19 pandemic period and non-COVID-19 period, respectively. During the COVID-19 pandemic, almost half of all GDM women (N1=36, 49.3%) used telemedicine as a method of contacting their diabetic specialist while this tool was not utilized in the earlier period. Moreover, these patients reported difficulties in performing blood glucose self-control more often (N1=20, 27.4% vs. N2=7, 8.5% p=0.002) and spent less time on diabetes education and training than the control group on average (N1=39, 53.4% vs. N2=9, 9.8% below 2 hours of training;p≤0.001). Glycemic control parameters were very similar and most analysed pregnancy outcomes occurred with comparable frequencies. Differences were found with respect to the incidence of prolonged labour which was more frequent in the COVID-19 period Group 1 (N1=12, 16.4% vs. N2=3, 3.7% p=0.007) whereas no episodes of pre-eclampsia were observed in this group (N1=0 vs. N2=7, 8.5% p=0.01) during this same time period. We report that the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did not seem to have a negative impact on glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in GDM women, in spite of difficulties in diabetes management delivery.

17.
J Diabetes Res ; 2021: 5515902, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301733

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a rapid adaptation of healthcare services to secure care for many patient groups. This includes women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We evaluated the impacts of the first COVID-19 wave on parameters such as the GDM treatment, glycemic control, and pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: In this retrospective study from a reference diabetes center (Krakow, Poland), we compared patient data from two different time periods: the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020-June 2020) and the preceding five months (October 2019-February 2020). Data was collected from the medical records and telephone surveys. RESULTS: We included 155 consecutive women (group N1 = 73 and group N2 = 82 from the COVID-19 pandemic period and non-COVID-19 period, respectively). During the COVID-19 pandemic, almost half of all GDM women (N1 = 36, 49.3%) used telemedicine as a method of contacting their diabetic specialists while this tool was not utilized in the earlier period. Moreover, these patients reported difficulties in performing blood glucose self-control more often (N1 = 20, 27.4%, vs N2 = 7, 8.5%; p ≤ 0.01) and spent less time on diabetes education than the control group on average (N1 = 39, 53.4%, vs N2 = 9, 9.8% below 2 hours of training; p ≤ 0.01). Most analyzed glycemic parameters and pregnancy outcomes were similar. Differences were found with respect to the incidence of prolonged labor (N1 = 12, 16.4%, vs N2 = 3, 3.7%; p ≤ 0.01) and preeclampsia (N1 = 0 vs N2 = 7, 8.5%; p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: In this single-center observational study, the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did not seem to have a negative impact on pregnancy outcomes in GDM women, despite the difficulties in diabetes management delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes, Gestational/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Diabetes, Gestational/blood , Disease Management , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Poland/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine
18.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(6): e28097, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the worldviews of most people. Social isolation after the COVID-19 lockdown has not only led to economic difficulties but also resulted in adverse psychological reactions. As in most countries, including Poland, this situation has been very challenging for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). In Poland, a crisis intervention team for patients with T1DM was established. The goal of the team was to provide psychological support for these patients, if needed, and to present information concerning how these patients may obtain medical consultations and prescriptions. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to analyze the psychological parameters and main emotional reactions of patients with T1DM during the COVID-19 lockdown. METHODS: An email with information concerning the possibility of having a web-based consultation with psychologists and psychiatrists and an attached set of psychological tests was sent to all patients with T1DM who were under the care of an outpatient diabetes clinic. The consultations were performed by licensed clinical psychologists and psychologists. This study was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. RESULTS: The patients who decided to use psychological support had statistically higher levels of anxiety (state P=.043; trait P=.022), stress (P=.001) than those of patients from the group who did not seek support. CONCLUSIONS: The presented intervention team may be perceived as an example of important and successful cooperation and communication between specialists of different fields of medicine (diabetology, psychiatry, and psychology) in a crisis situation.

19.
Neurol Neurochir Pol ; 55(3): 314-321, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244327

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the spectrum of neurological symptoms in patients with COVID-19 during the first 14 days of hospitalisation and its association with in-hospital mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included 200 patients with RT-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 admitted to University Hospital in Krakow, Poland. In 164 patients, a detailed questionnaire concerning neurological symptoms and signs was performed prospectively within 14 days of hospitalisation. In the remaining 36 patients, such questionnaires were completed retrospectively based on daily observations in the Department of Neurology. RESULTS: During hospitalisation, 169 patients (84.5%) experienced neurological symptoms; the most common were: fatigue (62.5%), decreased mood (45.5%), myalgia (43.5%), and muscle weakness (42.5%). Patients who died during hospitalisation compared to the remainder were older (79 [70.5-88.5] vs. 63.5 [51-77] years, p = 0.001), and more often had decreased level of consciousness (50.0% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.001), delirium (33.3% vs. 4.4%, p < 0.001), arterial hypotension (50.0% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.005) or stroke during (18.8% vs. 3.3%, p = 0.026) or before hospitalisation (50.0% vs. 7.1, p < 0.001), whereas those who survived more often suffered from headache (42.1% vs. 0%, p = 0.012) or decreased mood (51.7% vs. 0%, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Most hospitalised patients with COVID-19 experience neurological symptoms. Decreased level of consciousness, delirium, arterial hypotension, and stroke during or before hospitalisation increase the risk of in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Poland , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Case Rep Infect Dis ; 2021: 6627207, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201312

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a patient with clinical symptoms of pneumonia, negative in several polymerase chain reaction COVID-19 tests from nasopharyngeal swabs but suspected in computed tomography and finally confirmed in bronchoalveolar lavage material.

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