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1.
Insights Imaging ; 13(1): 41, 2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731541

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Data from radiological departments provide important information on overall quantities of medical care provided. With this study we used a comprehensive analysis of radiological examinations as a surrogate marker to quantify the effect of the different COVID-19 waves on medical care provided. METHODS: Radiological examination volumes during the different waves of infection were compared among each other as well as to time-matched control periods from pre-pandemic years using a locally weighted scatterplot smoothing as well as negative binominal regression models. RESULTS: A total of 1,321,119 radiological examinations were analyzed. Examination volumes were reduced by about 10% over the whole study period (IRR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.89-0.92), with a focus on acute medical care (0.84; 0.83-0.85) and outpatients (0.93: 0.90-0.97). When compared to wave 1, examination volumes were about 17% higher during wave 2 (1.17; 1.10-1.25), and 33% higher in wave 3 of the pandemic (1.33; 1.24-1.42). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the severe effect of COVID-19 pandemic and related shutdown measures on overall provided medical care as measured by radiological examinations. When compared, the decrease of medical care was more pronounced in the earlier waves of the pandemic.

2.
Rofo ; 193(8): 937-946, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139768

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: As a cross-section discipline within the hospital infrastructure, radiological departments might be able to provide important information regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare. The goal of this study was to quantify changes in medical care during the first wave of the pandemic using radiological examinations as a comprehensive surrogate marker and to determine potential future workload. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all radiological examinations during the first wave of the pandemic was performed. The number of examinations was compared to time-matched control periods. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of radiological examinations attributed to various medical specialties was conducted and postponed examinations were extrapolated to calculate additional workload in the near future. RESULTS: A total of 596,760 examinations were analyzed. Overall case volumes decreased by an average of 41 % during the shutdown compared to the control period. The most affected radiological modalities were sonography (-54 %), X-ray (-47 %) followed by MRI (-42 %). The most affected medical specialty was trauma and orthopedics (-60 % case volume) followed by general surgery (-49 %). Examination numbers increased during the post-shutdown period leading to a predicted additional workload of up to 22 %. CONCLUSION: This study shows a marked decrease in radiological examinations in total and among several core medical specialties, indicating a significant reduction in medical care during the first COVID-19 shutdown. KEY POINTS: · Number of radiological examinations decreased by 41 % during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.. · Several core medical specialties were heavily affected with a reduction of case volumes up to 60 %.. · When extrapolating postponed examinations to the near future, the overall workload for radiological departments might increase up to 22 %.. CITATION FORMAT: · Fleckenstein FN, Maleitzke T, Böning G et al. Decreased Medical Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Comprehensive Analysis of Radiological Examinations. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; 193: 937 - 946.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Radiography , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology , Workload , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Orthopedics , Radiography/trends , Radiology/trends , Retrospective Studies
3.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0246956, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of drastic shutdown measures worldwide. While quarantine, self-isolation and shutdown laws helped to effectively contain and control the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the impact of COVID-19 shutdowns on trauma care in emergency departments (EDs) remains elusive. METHODS: All ED patient records from the 35-day COVID-19 shutdown (SHUTDOWN) period were retrospectively compared to a calendar-matched control period in 2019 (CTRL) as well as to a pre (PRE)- and post (POST)-shutdown period in an academic Level I Trauma Center in Berlin, Germany. Total patient and orthopedic trauma cases and contacts as well as trauma causes and injury patterns were evaluated during respective periods regarding absolute numbers, incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and risk ratios (RRs). FINDINGS: Daily total patient cases (SHUTDOWN vs. CTRL, 106.94 vs. 167.54) and orthopedic trauma cases (SHUTDOWN vs. CTRL, 30.91 vs. 52.06) decreased during the SHUTDOWN compared to the CTRL period with IRRs of 0.64 and 0.59. While absolute numbers decreased for most trauma causes during the SHUTDOWN period, we observed increased incidence proportions of household injuries and bicycle accidents with RRs of 1.31 and 1.68 respectively. An RR of 2.41 was observed for injuries due to domestic violence. We further recorded increased incidence proportions of acute and regular substance abuse during the SHUTDOWN period with RRs of 1.63 and 3.22, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: While we observed a relevant decrease in total patient cases, relative proportions of specific trauma causes and injury patterns increased during the COVID-19 shutdown in Berlin, Germany. As government programs offered prompt financial aid during the pandemic to individuals and businesses, additional social support may be considered for vulnerable domestic environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fractures, Bone/classification , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Germany , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans
4.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1650

ABSTRACT

Background: Profound evaluation on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and related political measures on healthcare infrastructure is scarce and only slowly eme

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