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1.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(7): 1410-1417.e9, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic had a sudden, dramatic impact on healthcare. In Italy, since the beginning of the pandemic, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs have been forcefully suspended. We aimed to evaluate whether screening procedure delays can affect the outcomes of CRC screening. METHODS: We built a procedural model considering delays in the time to colonoscopy and estimating the effect on mortality due to up-stage migration of patients. The number of expected CRC cases was computed by using the data of the Italian screened population. Estimates of the effects of delay to colonoscopy on CRC stage, and of stage on mortality were assessed by a meta-analytic approach. RESULTS: With a delay of 0-3 months, 74% of CRC is expected to be stage I-II, while with a delay of 4-6 months there would be a 2%-increase for stage I-II and a concomitant decrease for stage III-IV (P = .068). Compared to baseline (0-3 months), moderate (7-12 months) and long (> 12 months) delays would lead to a significant increase in advanced CRC (from 26% to 29% and 33%, respectively; P = .008 and P < .001, respectively). We estimated a significant increase in the total number of deaths (+12.0%) when moving from a 0-3-months to a >12-month delay (P = .005), and a significant change in mortality distribution by stage when comparing the baseline with the >12-months (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Screening delays beyond 4-6 months would significantly increase advanced CRC cases, and also mortality if lasting beyond 12 months. Our data highlight the need to reorganize efforts against high-impact diseases such as CRC, considering possible future waves of SARS-CoV-2 or other pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Delayed Diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , Aged , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/mortality , Humans , Italy , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics
2.
Clin Nutr ; 2021 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284002

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: To investigate the association between the parameters used in nutritional screening assessment (body mass index [BMI], unintentional weight loss [WL] and reduced food intake) and clinical outcomes in non-critically ill, hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: This was a prospective multicenter real-life study carried out during the first pandemic wave in 11 Italian Hospitals. In total, 1391 patients were included. The primary end-point was a composite of in-hospital mortality or admission to ICU, whichever came first. The key secondary end-point was in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: Multivariable models were based on 1183 patients with complete data. Reduced self-reported food intake before hospitalization and/or expected by physicians in the next days since admission was found to have a negative prognostic impact for both the primary and secondary end-point (P < .001 for both). No association with BMI and WL was observed. Other predictors of outcomes were age and presence of multiple comorbidities. A significant interaction between obesity and multi-morbidity (≥2) was detected. Obesity was found to be a risk factor for composite end-point (HR = 1.36 [95%CI, 1.03-1.80]; P = .031) and a protective factor against in-hospital mortality (HR = 0.32 [95%CI, 0.20-0.51]; P < .001) in patients with and without multiple comorbidities, respectively. Secondary analysis (patients, N = 829), further adjusted for high C-reactive protein (>21 mg/dL) and LDH (>430 mU/mL) levels yielded consistent findings. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced self-reported food intake before hospitalization and/or expected by physicians in the next days since admission was associated with negative clinical outcomes in non-critically ill, hospitalized COVID-19 patients. This simple and easily obtainable parameter may be useful to identify patients at highest risk of poor prognosis, who may benefit from prompt nutritional support. The presence of comorbidities could be the key factor, which may determine the protective or harmful role of a high body mass index in COVID-19.

3.
J Autoimmun ; 114: 102511, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635467

ABSTRACT

In cases of COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome, an excessive host inflammatory response has been reported, with elevated serum interleukin-6 levels. In this multicenter retrospective cohort study we included adult patients with COVID-19, need of respiratory support, and elevated C-reactive protein who received intravenous tocilizumab in addition to standard of care. Control patients not receiving tocilizumab were matched for sex, age and respiratory support. We selected survival as the primary endpoint, along with need for invasive ventilation, thrombosis, hemorrhage, and infections as secondary endpoints at 30 days. We included 64 patients with COVID-19 in the tocilizumab group and 64 matched controls. At baseline the tocilizumab group had longer symptom duration (13 ± 5 vs. 9 ± 5 days) and received hydroxychloroquine more often than controls (100% vs. 81%). The mortality rate was similar between groups (27% with tocilizumab vs. 38%) and at multivariable analysis risk of death was not significantly influenced by tocilizumab (hazard ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.33-1.15), while being associated with the use at baseline of non invasive mechanical or invasive ventilation, and the presence of comorbidities. Among secondary outcomes, tocilizumab was associated with a lower probability of requiring invasive ventilation (hazard ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.83; P = 0.017) but not with the risk of thrombosis, bleeding, or infections. The use of intravenous tocilizumab was not associated with changes in 30-day mortality in patients with COVID-19 severe respiratory impairment. Among the secondary outcomes there was less use of invasive ventilation in the tocilizumab group.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Receptors, Interleukin-6/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
4.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 18(10): 2366-2368.e3, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-359348

ABSTRACT

Since February 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has spread to Italy affecting more than 100,000 people. Several studies have reported a high prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and investigated their potential association with clinical outcomes.1 The timing, clinical significance, and possible impact on viral spread of GI symptoms presentation have not been fully elucidated. Elevation of liver function tests and other laboratory values has also been reported; however, their prognostic significance has not been clearly established.2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
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