Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
2.
Neurol India ; 70(1): 409-411, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726256

ABSTRACT

Background: Postmarketing surveillance of COVID-19 vaccination reveals that the COVID-19 vaccine administration is associated with several rare but serious neurological complications. Case Report: We report a case of new-onset tumefactive demyelinating brain lesion that developed after administration of an adenovector-based COVID-19 vaccine. A middle-aged female presented with recent right hemiparesis, which was noticed 2 days after she received the first dose of the vaccine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities involving corpus callosum as well. The patient responded to oral methylprednisolone. At 4 weeks, a follow-up MRI revealed a reduction in size of the lesion. Conclusion: To conclude, adenovector-based COVID-19 vaccination may be associated with a tumefactive demyelinating lesion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Demyelinating Diseases/chemically induced , Adenoviridae , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Corpus Callosum/diagnostic imaging , Corpus Callosum/pathology , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 6045-6049, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432431

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to be associated with a lot of neurological complications, of whom Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an important post-infectious consequentiality. More than 220 patients with GBS have been reported thus far. We intend to share our experience with five patients of GBS where one of them had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This is the first-ever report demonstrating the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of an adult patient; a similar occurrence has recently been described in a pediatric patient. We wish to emphasize the fact that commonly GBS occurs as a result of a post-infectious process but in a few cases where the symptoms of COVID-19 and GBS occur concurrently, corresponding to the viremic phase, separate pathogenesis needs to be thought of. This para-infectious nature is exemplified by the presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of one of our patients. We review the neuroinvasive potential of SARS-Cov-2 in this regard and draw parallels with Cytomegalovirus, Zika virus, and Human Immunodeficiency virus-associated occurrences of GBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
4.
Neurol India ; 69(2): 260-271, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A variety of neuroimaging abnormalities in COVID-19 have been described. OBJECTIVES: In this article, we reviewed the varied neuroimaging patterns in patients with COVID-19-associated neurological complications. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus and preprint databases (medRxiv and bioRxiv). The search terms we used were "COVID -19 and encephalitis, encephalopathy, neuroimaging or neuroradiology" and "SARS-CoV-2 and encephalitis, encephalopathy, neuroimaging or neuroradiology". RESULTS: Neuroimaging abnormalities are common in old age and patients with comorbidities. Neuroimaging abnormalities are largely vascular in origin. COVID-19-associated coagulopathy results in large vessel occlusion and cerebral venous thrombosis. COVID-19-associated intracerebral hemorrhage resembles anticoagulant associated intracerebral hemorrhage. On neuroimaging, hypoxic-ischemic damage along with hyperimmune reaction against the SARS-COV-2 virus manifests as small vessel disease. Small vessel disease appears as diffuse leukoencephalopathy and widespread microbleeds, and subcortical white matter hyperintensities. Occasionally, gray matter hyperintensity, similar to those observed seen in autoimmune encephalitis, has been noted. In many cases, white matter lesions similar to that in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis have been described. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in COVID-19 seems to be a parainfectious event and autoimmune in origin. Many cases of acute necrotizing encephalitis resulting in extensive damage to thalamus and brain stem have been described; cytokine storm has been considered a pathogenic mechanism behind this. None of the neuroimaging abnormalities can provide a clue to the possible pathogenic mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: Periventricular white-matter MR hyperintensity, microbleeds, arterial and venous infarcts, and hemorrhages are apparently distinctive neuroimaging abnormalities in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Neuroimaging , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Leukoencephalitis, Acute Hemorrhagic
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 6045-6049, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281226

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to be associated with a lot of neurological complications, of whom Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an important post-infectious consequentiality. More than 220 patients with GBS have been reported thus far. We intend to share our experience with five patients of GBS where one of them had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This is the first-ever report demonstrating the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of an adult patient; a similar occurrence has recently been described in a pediatric patient. We wish to emphasize the fact that commonly GBS occurs as a result of a post-infectious process but in a few cases where the symptoms of COVID-19 and GBS occur concurrently, corresponding to the viremic phase, separate pathogenesis needs to be thought of. This para-infectious nature is exemplified by the presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of one of our patients. We review the neuroinvasive potential of SARS-Cov-2 in this regard and draw parallels with Cytomegalovirus, Zika virus, and Human Immunodeficiency virus-associated occurrences of GBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL