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1.
GMS journal for medical education ; 39(2), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1888144

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiac auscultation is a core clinical skill taught in medical school. Due to contact restrictions during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, interaction with patients was very limited. Therefore, a peer-to-peer virtual case-based auscultation course via video conference was established. Methods: A randomized controlled cross-over study was conducted to evaluate whether participation in a virtual auscultation course could improve heart auscultation skills in 3rd-year medical students. A total of sixty medical students were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group after informed consent was obtained. Due to no-shows, 55 students participated. Depending on allocation, students attended three ninety-minute courses in intervals of one week in a different order: a virtual case-based auscultation course held via video chat, literature self-study, and an on-site course using a high-fidelity auscultation simulator (SAM II). The study's primary endpoint was the performance of the two groups at the simulator after participating in the virtual auscultation course or literature self-study. To evaluate their auscultation skills, students participated in five assessments using the same six pathologies: stenosis and regurgitation of the aortic and mitral valve, ventricular septal defect, and patent ductus arteriosus. Moreover, participants rated their satisfaction with each course and provided a self-assessment of competence. Results: Compared to literature self-study, participation in the virtual auscultation course led to a significantly improved description of heart murmurs at the auscultation simulator with regard to the presence in systole and diastole, low- and high-pitched sounds, and volume dynamics. There was no significant difference between the groups in diagnostic accuracy and identification of the point of maximal intensity. After the virtual course, students showed higher satisfaction rates and a higher increase in self-assessed competence compared to participants who engaged in literature self-study. Conclusions: For the first time, this study demonstrates that a case-based virtual auscultation course can improve aspects of cardiac auscultation skills on a simulator. This may facilitate the further acquisition of an essential clinical skill, even when contact restrictions will be lifted.

2.
GMS J Med Educ ; 39(2): Doc21, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855297

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiac auscultation is a core clinical skill taught in medical school. Due to contact restrictions during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, interaction with patients was very limited. Therefore, a peer-to-peer virtual case-based auscultation course via video conference was established. Methods: A randomized controlled cross-over study was conducted to evaluate whether participation in a virtual auscultation course could improve heart auscultation skills in 3rd-year medical students. A total of sixty medical students were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group after informed consent was obtained. Due to no-shows, 55 students participated. Depending on allocation, students attended three ninety-minute courses in intervals of one week in a different order: a virtual case-based auscultation course held via video chat, literature self-study, and an on-site course using a high-fidelity auscultation simulator (SAM II). The study's primary endpoint was the performance of the two groups at the simulator after participating in the virtual auscultation course or literature self-study. To evaluate their auscultation skills, students participated in five assessments using the same six pathologies: stenosis and regurgitation of the aortic and mitral valve, ventricular septal defect, and patent ductus arteriosus. Moreover, participants rated their satisfaction with each course and provided a self-assessment of competence. Results: Compared to literature self-study, participation in the virtual auscultation course led to a significantly improved description of heart murmurs at the auscultation simulator with regard to the presence in systole and diastole, low- and high-pitched sounds, and volume dynamics. There was no significant difference between the groups in diagnostic accuracy and identification of the point of maximal intensity. After the virtual course, students showed higher satisfaction rates and a higher increase in self-assessed competence compared to participants who engaged in literature self-study. Conclusions: For the first time, this study demonstrates that a case-based virtual auscultation course can improve aspects of cardiac auscultation skills on a simulator. This may facilitate the further acquisition of an essential clinical skill, even when contact restrictions will be lifted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Over Studies , Heart Auscultation , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1940765, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269454

ABSTRACT

Due to comprehensive social distancing measures related to the COVID-19 pandemic, medical faculties worldwide have made a virtue of necessity in resorting to online teaching. Medical faculties grapple with how to convey clinical competencies to students in this context. There is a need for research not only to map but also to explain the effect of these secondary measures on students' learning and mental wellbeing. During a period of ongoing comprehensive social distancing measures in Germany, we translated a competency-based curriculum including obstetrics, paediatrics, and human genetics to an e-learning course based on online patient and teacher encounters. In our qualitative study on students' and teachers' views, we identify potential enablers and drivers as well as barriers and challenges to undergraduate medical education under lockdown. In summer 2020, we conducted six focus group interviews to investigate medical students' and teachers' perspectives, experiences and attitudes. All focus groups were videotaped, transcribed verbatim and coded. To guide our deductive and inductive analysis, we applied the theoretical framework of Regmi and Jones. Content analysis was performed in a multi-perspective group. We identified five major themes contributing to a successful use of clinical competency-based e-learning under lockdown: Communication (with teachers, students, and patients), Mental wellbeing, Structure and self-organization, Technical issues, and Learning and commitment. We discuss enablers and potential barriers within all themes and their overlap and link them in an explanatory model. In our setting, students and teachers find e-learning holds strong potential and especially in times of COVID-19 it is greatly appreciated. We broaden the understanding of the impact of distant learning on acquiring competencies, on attitudes, and on mental wellbeing. Our model may serve for a thoughtful, necessary transition to future e-learning and hybrid programs for a competency-based medical education with ongoing social distancing measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/standards , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Adult , Competency-Based Education/organization & administration , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Faculty, Medical , Focus Groups , Germany , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical
4.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc102, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970665

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Auscultation skills are among the basic techniques to be learned in medical school. Such skills are achieved through supervised examination of patients often supported by simulator-based learning. The emergence of COVID-19 has disrupted and continues to hinder hands-on on-site medical training on a global scale. Project description: An effective virtual auscultation course was established in times of contact restrictions due to COVID-19 at the Medical Faculty of the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf. The interactive case-based webinar was designed to improve listening techniques, description and interpretation of auscultation findings in an off-site context. Clinical cases with pre-recorded auscultation sounds and additional case-based diagnostics were presented. The course focused on common heart murmurs including aortic and mitral valve stenosis and regurgitation as well as congenital heart defects (ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus). Results: The course was well received by the students and assessed as being useful and instructive. Assessment of learning effects, such as detection of pathological findings before and after training, is ongoing as part of a subsequent trial. Conclusion: Virtual interactive learning using a sound simulation lesson with clinical case presentations via video chat can well be used as a supplement to practical auscultation training. This learning format could also play a useful role in the curriculum of medical studies once contact restrictions are revoked.


Subject(s)
Auscultation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology
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