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1.
Sustainability ; 14(14):8766, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1938994

ABSTRACT

The aquaculture and fisheries sectors are critical sources of nutrition and employment generation in many developed and developing countries. Hence, any disruptions to these sectors due to the COVID-19 pandemic have a far-reaching impact, leading to a cascading chain of disorder affecting people's food security and livelihoods. Relating to these fish sectors, we reviewed COVID-19's implications for the food security of these vulnerable countries. The current study indicated that COVID-19 and its related preventive measures have severely disrupted the fish demand and supply chain by creating considerable fish price volatility. As a result, the vulnerable aquatic communities have adopted several short-term coping strategies, including fish overwintering, delayed fish stocking time, and feeding the overcrowded fish with low-priced food. Since the long-term coping strategies are still unclear, we recommended certain longstanding methods that are likely to safeguard food security and livelihoods if adopted.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-304692

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an infectious disease spreading through human touch. This study explored the risk perception and knowledge towards COVID-19 infection among Bangladeshi adult participants. Two self-administered online surveys were administered at two different time points from 26-31 March 2020 (Early lockdown) and 11-16 May 2020 (Late lockdown) through social media on 1005 respondents (322 and 683 participants, respectively) during COVID-19 lockdown period in Bangladesh. Univariate and multiple linear regression models were used to examine factors associated with risk perception and knowledge towards COVID-19. The mean knowledge (8.4 vs. 8.1, P=0.022) and risk perception (11.2 vs. 10.6, P <0.001) scores differ significantly between early and late lockdown. Compared to the early lockdown period, the scores for perceived risk of contracting COVID-19 decreased significantly while public knowledge about COVID-19 was lower but not statistically significant. Female participants who practiced high quarantine particularly those who did so at the public health order during the lockdown reported increased knowledge towards the spread of COVID-19 and perceived high risk of contracting COVID-19. Education intervention using awareness to increase public knowledge and perception towards COVID-19 in Bangladesh should target male participants who practiced low quarantine and are less worried about the spread of such novel coronavirus even as the physical distancing persists.

3.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260821, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561237

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Studies related to the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy are scanty in Bangladesh, despite the growing necessity of understanding the population behavior related to vaccination. Thus, the present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and its associated factors in Bangladesh to fill the knowledge gap. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This study adopted a cross-sectional design to collect data from 1497 respondents using online (Google forms) and face-to-face interviews from eight administrative divisions of Bangladesh between 1-7 February 2021. We employed descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of vaccine hesitancy was 46.2%. The Muslims (aOR = 1.80, p ≤ 0.01) and the respondents living in the city corporation areas (aOR = 2.14, p ≤0.001) had more hesitancy. There was significant variation in vaccine hesitancy by administrative divisions (geographic regions). Compared to the Sylhet division, the participants from Khulna (aOR = 1.31, p ≤0.001) had higher hesitancy. The vaccine hesitancy tended to decrease with increasing knowledge about the vaccine (aOR = 0.88, p≤0.001) and the vaccination process (aOR = 0.91, p ≤ 0.01). On the other hand, hesitancy increased with the increased negative attitudes towards the vaccine (aOR = 1.17, p≤0.001) and conspiracy beliefs towards the COVID-19 vaccine (aOR = 1.04, p≤0.01). The perceived benefits of COVID-19 vaccination (aOR = 0.85, p≤0.001) were negatively associated with hesitancy, while perceived barriers (aOR = 1.16, p ≤0.001) were positively associated. The participants were more hesitant to accept the vaccine from a specific country of origin (India, USA, Europe). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings warrant that a vigorous behavior change communication campaign should be designed and implemented to demystify negative public attitudes and conspiracy beliefs regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine in Bangladesh. The policymakers should also think about revisiting the policy of the online registration process to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, as online registration is a key structural barrier for many due to the persistent digital divide in the country. Finally, the government should consider the population's preference regarding vaccines' country of manufacture to reduce the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , /psychology , Young Adult
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470832

ABSTRACT

Previous studies on internet use frequency were focused on mental health impact, with little known about the impact on physical health during the COVID-19 lockdown. This study examined the impact of internet use frequency on self-reported physical health during the COVID-19 lockdown in Bangladesh. A web-based cross-sectional study on 3242 individuals was conducted from 2 August-1 October 2020. The survey covered demographics, internet use frequency and self-reported physical health questions. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the impact of internet use frequency on physical health. 72.5%, 69.9%, 65.1% and 55.3% respondents reported headache, back pain, numbness of the fingers and neck pain, respectively. The analyses showed increased physical health impact among regular (coefficient ß = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18-0.85, p = 0.003), frequent (ß = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.88-1.54, p < 0.001) and intense (ß = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.91-2.57, p < 0.001) internet users. Other important predictors were gender, income, occupation, regions, and working status. Frequent and extensive uses of the internet were strong predictors of physical health problems, and our findings suggest the need for increased awareness about the physical health problems that can be triggered by excessive internet usage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Health Secur ; 19(5): 468-478, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467288

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated fear, panic, distress, anxiety, and depression among many people in Bangladesh. In this cross-sectional study, we examined factors associated with different levels of psychological impact as a result of COVID-19 in Bangladesh. From April 1 to 30, 2020, we used a self-administered online questionnaire to collect data from 10,609 respondents. Using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised to assess the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on respondents, we categorized the levels of impact as normal, mild, moderate, or severe. Ordinal logistic regression was used to examine the associated factors. The prevalence of mild, moderate, and severe psychological impact was 10.2%, 4.8%, and 45.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the odds of reporting normal vs mild, moderate, or severe psychological impact were 5.9 times higher for people living in the Chittagong Division, 1.7 times higher for women with lower education levels, 3.0 times higher among those who were divorced or separated, 1.8 times higher for those working full time, and 2.4 times higher for those living in shared apartments. The odds of reporting a psychological impact were also higher among people who did not enforce protective measures inside the home, those in self-quarantine, those who did not wear face masks, and those who did not comply with World Health Organization precautionary measures. Increased psychological health risks due to COVID-19 were significantly higher among people who experienced chills, headache, cough, breathing difficulties, dizziness, and sore throat before data collection. Our results showed that 1 in 2 respondents experienced a significant psychological impact as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Public health researchers should consider these factors when targeting interventions that would have a protective effect on the individual's psychological health during a pandemic or future disease outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Front Public Health ; 9: 711066, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399194

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the prevalence and investigate the constellations of psychological determinants of the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among the Bangladeshi adult population utilizing the health belief model-HBM (perceived susceptibility to and severity of COVID-19, perceived benefits of and barriers to COVID-19 vaccination, and cues to action), the theory of planned behavior-TPB (attitude toward COVID-19 vaccine, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and anticipated regret), and the 5C psychological antecedents (confidence, constraints, complacency, calculation, and collective responsibility). We compared the predictability of these theoretical frameworks to see which framework explains the highest variance in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. This study adopted a cross-sectional research design. We collected data from a nationally representative sample of 1,497 respondents through both online and face-to-face interviews. We employed multiple linear regression analysis to assess the predictability of each model of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. We found a 41.1% prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among our study respondents. After controlling the effects of socio-economic, demographic, and other COVID-19 related covariates, we found that the TPB has the highest predictive power (adjusted R 2 = 0.43), followed by the 5C psychological antecedents of vaccination (adjusted R 2 = 0.32) and the HBM (adjusted R 2 = 0.31) in terms of explaining total variance in the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among the adults of Bangladesh. This study provides evidence that theoretical frameworks like the HBM, the TPB, and the 5C psychological antecedents can be used to explore the psychological determinants of vaccine hesitancy, where the TPB has the highest predictability. Our findings can be used to design targeted interventions to reduce vaccine hesitancy and increase vaccine uptake to prevent COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Belief Model , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Mar Policy ; 129: 104523, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201303

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a shock affecting all areas of the global food system. We tracked the impacts of COVID-19 and associated policy responses on the availability and price of aquatic foods and production inputs during 2020, using a high frequency longitudinal survey of 768 respondents in Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Myanmar, Nigeria. We found the following: (1) Aquatic food value chains were severely disrupted but most effects on the availability and accessibility of aquatic foods and production inputs were short-lived. (2) Impacts on demand for aquatic foods, production inputs, and labor have been longer lasting than impacts on their supply. (3) Retail prices of aquatic foods spiked briefly during March-May 2020 but trended down thereafter, whereas prices of production inputs rose. These trends suggest a deepening 'squeeze' on the financial viability of producers and other value chain actors. (4) Survey respondents adapted to the challenges of COVID-19 by reducing production costs, sourcing alternative inputs, diversifying business activities, leveraging social capital, borrowing, seeking alternative employment, and reducing food consumption. Many of these coping strategies are likely to undermine well-being and longer-term resilience, but we also find some evidence of proactive strategies with potential to strengthen business performance. Global production of aquatic food likely contracted significantly in 2020. The importance of aquatic food value chains in supporting livelihoods and food and nutrition security in Asia and Africa makes their revitalization essential in the context of COVID-19 recovery efforts. We outline immediate and longer-term policies and interventions to support this goal.

8.
Stigma and Health ; : No Pagination Specified, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1172547

ABSTRACT

The state in Bangladesh has instituted a series of policies and practices during the COVID-19 pandemic that reflects structural stigma. Stigma is now considered a complex phenomenon rather than just one set of beliefs. Thus, the level and correlates of stigma toward individuals and households that have become positive with the Coronavirus are of critical interest and importance. This article describes the nature of the Bangladesh government's unusual labeling practices as a structural stigma and examines the stigma levels among Bangladeshi adults. A web-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,056 adult respondents. We used 10 Likert items (alpha = 0.630) to measure the level of stigmatized attitudes related to COVID-19. The data were analyzed using t-tests, ANOVA, and correlation coefficients to identify the factors associated with the dependent variable at the bivariate level. The multiple linear regression model was also fitted. The findings of the study show that 90.8% of the respondents had at least one stigmatized attitude. The regression analysis result shows that marital status, educational attainment, place of residence, risk perception, and attitudes toward COVID-19 were the most significant factors of stigmatized attitudes among the population in Bangladesh. This study suggests that state-sponsored labeling of COVID-19 positive people should be stopped immediately, and the privacy and confidentiality of the COVID-19 positive people should be appropriately maintained. Health education programs should also be adopted for all age groups to decrease negative attitudes toward this disease by increasing their knowledge and awareness for preventing COVID-19. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Glob Food Sec ; 29: 100526, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1128998

ABSTRACT

The effects of COVID-19 are continuing to increase around the world as the pandemic claims thousands of lives. Bangladesh is no exception and has been greatly affected by SARS-CoV-2. Apart from the number of people who are or have been directly getting infected with this disease, millions of people are directly or indirectly facing many challenges to their livelihoods and the security of their food and nutritional supply, along with other societal issues created by the pandemic. In this study, a hybrid approach of online and telephone questionnaire surveys was used to investigate the food security of Dhaka city's inhabitants at household level. Approximately 80% of the respondents reported reduced income, and a quarter of respondents lost their jobs between March and June 2020. The frequency of fish consumption, an essential component of Bangladeshi diets, significantly reduced during the pandemic. This was especially apparent in affluent segments of the community. Out of the respondents, 75% reported an increase in the price of fish in Dhaka city. A range of coping strategies were observed: including decreasing the frequency of grocery shopping, shifting to online shopping, reducing consumption of high price commodities, reducing junk food consumption, cleaning fish and meat with hot water and vinegar, and increasing the consumption of protein and vitamin C rich food items. Prior to COVID-19, 80% of the households surveyed bought fish from wet markets. This number dropped to 45% during the pandemic. Many households substituted fish and meat with poultry, eggs and dried fish. About half of the households stockpiled rice, lentils and potatoes during the peak of the pandemic. However, if the pandemic lasts for a prolonged period, those living on low incomes in urban areas will experience some level of food insecurity from a reduced income or loss of work. Because of this, a large-scale sustainability policy should be undertaken to secure the food and nutritional security of low-income and middle-class household.

10.
Front Public Health ; 8: 582701, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052494

ABSTRACT

This study assessed the preparedness regarding the preventive practices toward the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among the adult population in Bangladesh. Data were collected through an online survey with a sample size of 1,056. We constructed four variables (individual, household, economic, and community and social distancing) related to preparedness based on the principal component analysis of eight items. We employed descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis. The results showed that the accuracy rate of the overall preparedness scale was 68.9%. The preparedness level related to economic, individual, household, and community and social distancing was 64.9, 77.1, 50.4, and 83.2%, respectively. However, the economic preparedness significantly varied by sex, education, occupation, attitude, and worries related to COVID-19. Individual preparedness was significantly associated with education, residence, and attitudes. The household preparedness significantly varied by education, residence, and worries, while the respondent's community and social distancing-related preparedness significantly varied by sex, region, residence, and attitude. This study implies the necessity of the coverage of financial schemes for the vulnerable group. Increased coverage of health education regarding personal hygiene targeting the less educated and rural population should be ensured.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Population Health , Adult , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Education , Humans , Internet , Male , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Sustainability ; 13(2):864, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1031161

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the mediating and moderating effects of competitive advantage and access to working capital, respectively, on the relationship between entrepreneurial competencies and informal microenterprise economic performance in Senegal from the lens of resource-based view theory (RBV). Data were randomly gathered using the cross-sectional research design from 356 informal micro-entrepreneurs operating in the informal sector. The study outcomes revealed that entrepreneurial competencies and competitive advantage emerged as significant predictors of economic performance for informal microenterprises in Senegal. On the contrary, access to working capital displayed an adverse moderating effect, while competitive advantage exhibited a partial and positive mediating effect on the relationship between entrepreneurial competencies and economic performance of informal microenterprises. The Important and Performance Matrix Analysis (IPMA) results signify that the most significant considerations for the economic performance of informal microenterprises in Senegal were competitive advantage, access to working capital, commitment competency, and relationship competency. Simultaneously, this study expanded the reach of RBV by enhancing our understanding pertaining to the mediating and moderating roles in the relationships among entrepreneurial competencies, competitive advantage, and access to working capital towards improving the economic performance of informal microenterprises across developing countries. Since many have lost their jobs due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Government of Senegal and its policymakers should place more emphasis on the importance of informal entrepreneurship, such as provision of low-interest credit facilities for their working capital, as well as thorough training in the strategic advantage and competencies domains. This is because informal entrepreneurs have the ability, via jobs creation and income generating activities, to contribute to the economic growth of the country.

12.
Heliyon ; 6(12): e05799, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996920

ABSTRACT

The Government of Bangladesh has adopted several non-therapeutic measures to tackle the pandemic of SARS-CoV-2. However, the curve of COVID-19 positive cases has not significantly flattened yet, as the adoption of preventive measures by the general population is predominantly a behavioral phenomenon that is often influenced by people's knowledge and attitudes. This study aimed to assess the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behavioral practices toward COVID-19 and their interrelationships among the population of Bangladesh aged 18 years and above. This study adopted a web-based cross-sectional survey design and collected data from 1056 respondents using the online platform Google Form. We employed the independent sample t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson's product-moment correlation, and Spearman rank-order correlation to produce the bivariate level statistics. We also run multiple linear and logistic regression models to identify the factors affecting knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behavioral practices toward COVID-19. The respondents had an average knowledge score of 17.29 (Standard Deviation (SD) = 3.30). The average score for attitude scale toward COVID-19 was 13.6 (SD = 3.7). The respondents had excellent preventive behavioral practices toward COVID-19 (mean 7.7, SD = 0.72). However, this study found that knowledge and attitudes did not matter for preventive behavioral practices toward COVID-19. Instead, education appeared as a sole predictor for preventive behavioral practices toward COVID-19; that means preventive behavioral practices toward COVID-19 was lower among the less educated respondents. This study suggests increasing education as a long-term strategy and taking immediate action to increase knowledge and decrease negative attitudes toward COVID-19 through targeted health education initiatives as a short-term strategy.

13.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 563478, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-909021

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, a novel coronavirus (CoV) was found at the seafood market of Hubei province in Wuhan, China, and this virus was officially named coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) by World Health Organization (WHO). COVID-19 is mainly characterized by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2) and creates public health concerns as well as significant threats to the economy around the world. Unfortunately, the pathogenesis of COVID-19 is unclear and there is no effective treatment of this newly life-threatening and devastating virus. Therefore, it is crucial to search for alternative methods that alleviate or inhibit the spread of COVID-19. In this review, we try to find out the etiology, epidemiology, symptoms as well as transmissions of this novel virus. We also summarize therapeutic interventions and suggest antiviral treatments, immune-enhancing candidates, general supplements, and CoV specific treatments that control replication and reproduction of SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(14)2020 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-669587

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the perception and awareness of risk among adult participants in Bangladesh about Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). During the lockdown era in Bangladesh at two different time points, from 26-31 March 2020 (early lockdown) and 11-16 May 2020 (late lockdown), two self-administered online surveys were conducted on 1005 respondents (322 and 683 participants, respectively) via social media. To examine risk perception and knowledge-related factors towards COVID-19, univariate and multiple linear regression models were employed. Scores of mean knowledge (8.4 vs. 8.1, p = 0.022) and perception of risk (11.2 vs. 10.6, p < 0.001) differed significantly between early and late lockdown. There was a significant decrease in perceived risk scores for contracting SARS-Cov-2 [ß = -0.85, 95%CI: -1.31, -0.39], while knowledge about SARS-Cov-2 decreased insignificantly [ß = -0.22, 95%CI: -0.46, 0.03] in late lockdown compared with early lockdown period. Self-quarantine was a common factor linked to increased perceived risks and knowledge of SARS-Cov-2 during the lockdown period. Any effort to increase public awareness and comprehension of SARS-Cov-2 in Bangladesh will then offer preference to males, who did not practice self-quarantine and are less worried about the propagation of this kind of virus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Internet , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Social Perception , Adult , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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