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1.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(3): 266-270, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856279

ABSTRACT

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 may trigger a delayed hyper-inflammatory illness in children called paediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS). A similar syndrome is increasingly recognised in adults termed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) and may present acutely to medical or surgical specialties with severe symptoms, such as acute abdominal pain or cardiogenic shock. No national guidelines exist in the UK for the management of MIS-A and there is limited evidence to guide treatment plans. We undertook a national Delphi process to elicit opinions from experts in hyperinflammation about the diagnosis and management of MIS-A with the dual aim of improving recognition and producing a management guideline. Colleagues in paediatrics successfully initiated a national consensus management document that facilitated regional multidisciplinary referral and follow-up pathways for children with PIMS-TS, and we propose a similar system be developed for adult patients across the UK. This would facilitate better recognition and treatment of MIS-A across the multiple specialties to which it may present as well as enable follow-up with specialty services post-discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aftercare , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Humans , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , United Kingdom
2.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 3(10): e672-e673, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486379
4.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 2(10): e594-e602, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A subset of patients with severe COVID-19 develop a hyperinflammatory syndrome, which might contribute to morbidity and mortality. This study explores a specific phenotype of COVID-19-associated hyperinflammation (COV-HI), and its associations with escalation of respiratory support and survival. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we enrolled consecutive inpatients (aged ≥18 years) admitted to University College London Hospitals and Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals in the UK with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 during the first wave of community-acquired infection. Demographic data, laboratory tests, and clinical status were recorded from the day of admission until death or discharge, with a minimum follow-up time of 28 days. We defined COV-HI as a C-reactive protein concentration greater than 150 mg/L or doubling within 24 h from greater than 50 mg/L, or a ferritin concentration greater than 1500 µg/L. Respiratory support was categorised as oxygen only, non-invasive ventilation, and intubation. Initial and repeated measures of hyperinflammation were evaluated in relation to the next-day risk of death or need for escalation of respiratory support (as a combined endpoint), using a multi-level logistic regression model. FINDINGS: We included 269 patients admitted to one of the study hospitals between March 1 and March 31, 2020, among whom 178 (66%) were eligible for escalation of respiratory support and 91 (34%) patients were not eligible. Of the whole cohort, 90 (33%) patients met the COV-HI criteria at admission. Despite having a younger median age and lower median Charlson Comorbidity Index scores, a higher proportion of patients with COV-HI on admission died during follow-up (36 [40%] of 90 patients) compared with the patients without COV-HI on admission (46 [26%] of 179). Among the 178 patients who were eligible for full respiratory support, 65 (37%) met the definition for COV-HI at admission, and 67 (74%) of the 90 patients whose respiratory care was escalated met the criteria by the day of escalation. Meeting the COV-HI criteria was significantly associated with the risk of next-day escalation of respiratory support or death (hazard ratio 2·24 [95% CI 1·62-2·87]) after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidity. INTERPRETATION: Associations between elevated inflammatory markers, escalation of respiratory support, and survival in people with COVID-19 indicate the existence of a high-risk inflammatory phenotype. COV-HI might be useful to stratify patient groups in trial design. FUNDING: None.

6.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 2(9): e522-e523, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664704
7.
Lancet Respir Med ; 8(8): 822-830, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599200

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global public health crisis, with considerable mortality and morbidity exerting pressure on health-care resources, including critical care. An excessive host inflammatory response in a subgroup of patients with severe COVID-19 might contribute to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiorgan failure. Timely therapeutic intervention with immunomodulation in patients with hyperinflammation could prevent disease progression to ARDS and obviate the need for invasive ventilation. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an immunoregulatory cytokine with a pivotal role in initiation and perpetuation of inflammatory diseases. GM-CSF could link T-cell-driven acute pulmonary inflammation with an autocrine, self-amplifying cytokine loop leading to monocyte and macrophage activation. This axis has been targeted in cytokine storm syndromes and chronic inflammatory disorders. Here, we consider the scientific rationale for therapeutic targeting of GM-CSF in COVID-19-associated hyperinflammation. Since GM-CSF also has a key role in homoeostasis and host defence, we discuss potential risks associated with inhibition of GM-CSF in the context of viral infection and the challenges of doing clinical trials in this setting, highlighting in particular the need for a patient risk-stratification algorithm.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Progression , Humans , Immunomodulation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 2(6): e358-e367, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-165219

ABSTRACT

The term cytokine storm syndromes describes conditions characterised by a life-threatening, fulminant hypercytokinaemia with high mortality. Cytokine storm syndromes can be genetic or a secondary complication of autoimmune or autoinflammatory disorders, infections, and haematological malignancies. These syndromes represent a key area of interface between rheumatology and general medicine. Rheumatologists often lead in management, in view of their experience using intensive immunosuppressive regimens and managing cytokine storm syndromes in the context of rheumatic disorders or infection (known as secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis or macrophage activation syndrome [sHLH/MAS]). Interleukin (IL)-1 is pivotal in hyperinflammation. Anakinra, a recombinant humanised IL-1 receptor antagonist, is licenced at a dose of 100 mg once daily by subcutaneous injection for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult-onset Still's disease, and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. In cytokine storm syndromes, the subcutaneous route is often problematic, as absorption can be unreliable in patients with critical illness, and multiple injections are needed to achieve the high doses required. As a result, intravenous anakinra is used in clinical practice for sHLH/MAS, despite this being an off-licence indication and route of administration. Among 46 patients admitted to our three international, tertiary centres for sHLH/MAS and treated with anakinra over 12 months, the intravenous route of delivery was used in 18 (39%) patients. In this Viewpoint, we describe current challenges in the management of cytokine storm syndromes and review the pharmacokinetic and safety profile of intravenous anakinra. There is accumulating evidence to support the rationale for, and safety of, intravenous anakinra as a first-line treatment in patients with sHLH/MAS. Intravenous anakinra has important clinical relevance when high doses of drug are required or if patients have subcutaneous oedema, severe thrombocytopenia, or neurological involvement. Cross-speciality management and collaboration, with the generation of international, multi-centre registries and biobanks, are needed to better understand the aetiopathogenesis and improve the poor prognosis of cytokine storm syndromes.

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