Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
J Neurol ; 268(12): 4407-4414, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection has been associated with various neurological manifestations. Since patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection present coagulation and immune system dysregulation, ischemic or haemorragic stroke is not uncommon, irrespective of respiratory distress. However, the occurrence of focal neurological deficits together with other symptoms like headache, cortical blindness, seizure and altered mental status should prompt the diagnosis of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES). Antithrombotic treatment, the alteration of endothelial function, and coagulopathy due to COVID-19 and PRES leading to the breakdown of blood-brain barrier may then contribute to the occurrence of a brain haemorrhage. METHODS: We describe the case of a COVID-19 patient who developed bilateral occipital lobe haemorrhages suggestive of haemorrhagic PRES. We then reviewed the available literature about haemorrhagic evolution of PRES in COVID-19. RESULTS: We describe the clinical and radiological features of five COVID-19 patients who developed haemorrhagic PRES. CONCLUSIONS: Coagulopathy and endothelial dysfunction resulting from the massive release of cytokines during the host immune response may be key factors in the pathogenesis of COVID-19-related PRES. Antithrombotic therapy and the leakage of the blood-brain barrier can subsequently increase the risk of haemorrhagic transformation of the lesioned brain tissue. A prompt diagnosis of PRES is mandatory, since the timely interruption/reversal of antithrombotic therapy may be a key determinant for a good prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnostic imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/complications , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
2.
Neurol Sci ; 42(8): 3089-3092, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245657

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Falls could be serious events in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patient remote monitoring strategies are on the raise and may be an additional aid in identifying patients who are at risk of falling. The aim of the study was to evaluate if balance and timed-up-and-go data obtained by a smartphone application during COVID-19 lockdown were able to predict falls in PD patients. METHODS: A cohort of PD patients were monitored for 4 weeks during the COVID-19 lockdown with an application measuring static balance and timed-up-and-go test. The main outcome was the occurrence of falls (UPDRS-II item 13) during the observation period. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients completed the study, and 4 (12%) reported falls in the observation period. The rate of falls was reduced with respect to patient previous falls history (24%). The stand-up time and the mediolateral sway, acquired through the application, differed between "fallers" and "non-fallers" and related to the occurrence of new falls (OR 1.7 and 1.6 respectively, p < 0.05), together with previous falling (OR 7.5, p < 0.01). In a multivariate model, the stand-up time and the history of falling independently related to the outcome (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides new data on falls in Parkinson's disease during the lockdown. The reduction of falling events and the relationship with the stand-up time might suggest that a different quality of falls occurs when patient is forced to stay home - hence, clinicians should point their attention also on monitoring patients' sit-to-stand body transition other than more acknowledged features based on step quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Communicable Disease Control , Gait , Gait Analysis , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Postural Balance , SARS-CoV-2 , Smartphone , Time and Motion Studies
3.
Front Neurol ; 11: 616550, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006082

ABSTRACT

Background: The containment measures taken by Italian government authorities during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic caused the interruption of neurological activities of outpatient clinics. Vulnerable patients, as Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonic patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS), may have an increased risk of chronic stress related to social restriction measures and may show a potential worsening of motor and psychiatric symptoms. Methods: This cross-sectional multicenter study was carried out during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and was based on a structured survey administered during a telephone call. The questionnaire was designed to gather motor and/or psychiatric effects of the lockdown and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemiologic information in PD and dystonic patients with a functioning DBS implant. Results: One hundred four patients were included in the study, 90 affected by PD and 14 by dystonia. Forty-nine patients reported a subjective perception of worsening of global neurological symptoms (motor and/or psychiatric) related to the containment measures. In the multivariate analysis, having problems with the DBS device was the only independent predictor of motor worsening [odds ratio (OR) = 3.10 (1.22-7.91), p = 0.018]. Independent predictors of psychiatric worsening were instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) score [OR = 0.78 (0.64-0.95), p = 0.012] and problems with DBS [OR = 5.69 (1.95-16.62), p = 0.001]. Only one patient underwent nasopharyngeal swabs, both negative, and no patient received a diagnosis of COVID-19. Conclusions: Lockdown restriction measures were associated with subjective worsening of motor and psychiatric symptoms in PD and dystonic patients treated with DBS, and they may have exacerbated the burden of neurological disease and increased the chronic stress related to the DBS management.

4.
Front Neurol ; 11: 567413, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895311

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a smartphone remote patient monitoring approach in a real-life Parkinson's disease (PD) cohort during the Italian COVID-19 lockdown. Methods: Fifty-four non-demented PD patients who were supposed to attend the outpatient March clinic were recruited for a prospective study. All patients had a known UPDRS-III and a modified Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) score and were provided with a smartphone application capable of providing indicators of gait, tapping, tremor, memory and executive functions. Different questionnaires exploring non-motor symptoms and quality of life were administered through phone-calls. Patients were asked to run the app at least twice per week (i.e., full compliance). Subjects were phone-checked weekly throughout a 3-week period for compliance and final satisfaction questionnaires. Results: Forty-five patients (83.3%) ran the app at least once; Twenty-nine (53.7%) subjects were half-compliant, while 16 (29.6%) were fully compliant. Adherence was hindered by technical issues or digital illiteracy (38.7%), demotivation (24%) and health-related issues (7.4%). Ten patients (18.5%) underwent PD therapy changes. The main factors related to lack of compliance included loss of interest, sadness, anxiety, the absence of a caregiver, the presence of falls and higher H&Y. Gait, tapping, tremor and cognitive application outcomes were correlated to disease duration, UPDRS-III and H&Y. Discussion: The majority of patients were compliant and satisfied by the provided monitoring program. Some of the application outcomes were statistically correlated to clinical parameters, but further validation is required. Our pilot study suggested that the available technologies could be readily implemented even with the current population's technical and intellectual resources.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL