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1.
Nat Cell Biol ; 25(4): 550-564, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260687

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the RNA virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although SARS-CoV-2 was reported to alter several cellular pathways, its impact on DNA integrity and the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here we show that SARS-CoV-2 causes DNA damage and elicits an altered DNA damage response. Mechanistically, SARS-CoV-2 proteins ORF6 and NSP13 cause degradation of the DNA damage response kinase CHK1 through proteasome and autophagy, respectively. CHK1 loss leads to deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) shortage, causing impaired S-phase progression, DNA damage, pro-inflammatory pathways activation and cellular senescence. Supplementation of deoxynucleosides reduces that. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 N-protein impairs 53BP1 focal recruitment by interfering with damage-induced long non-coding RNAs, thus reducing DNA repair. Key observations are recapitulated in SARS-CoV-2-infected mice and patients with COVID-19. We propose that SARS-CoV-2, by boosting ribonucleoside triphosphate levels to promote its replication at the expense of dNTPs and by hijacking damage-induced long non-coding RNAs' biology, threatens genome integrity and causes altered DNA damage response activation, induction of inflammation and cellular senescence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Cellular Senescence , DNA Damage
2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 11(3)2023 Mar 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284834

ABSTRACT

The early availability of effective vaccines against SARS-CoV-2, the aetiologic cause of COVID-19, has been at the cornerstone of the global recovery from the pandemic. This study aimed to assess the antispike RBD IgG antibody titres and neutralisation potential of COVID-19 convalescent plasma and the sera of Moldovan adults vaccinated with the Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV vaccine. An IgG ELISA with recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD and two pseudovirus-based neutralisation assays have been developed to evaluate neutralising antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in biosafety level 2 containment facilities. A significant moderate correlation was observed between IgG titres and the overall neutralising levels for each neutralisation assay (ρ = 0.64, p < 0.001; ρ = 0.52, p < 0.001). A separate analysis of convalescent and vaccinated individuals showed a higher correlation of neutralising and IgG titres in convalescent individuals (ρ = 0.68, p < 0.001, ρ = 0.45, p < 0.001) compared with vaccinated individuals (ρ = 0.58, p < 0.001; ρ = 0.53, p < 0.001). It can be concluded that individuals who recovered from infection developed higher levels of antispike RBD IgG antibodies. In comparison, the Sinopharm-vaccinated individuals produced higher levels of neutralising antibodies than convalescent plasma.

3.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 12(1): e0113222, 2023 Jan 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2236482

ABSTRACT

The whole-genome sequences of 15 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strains from nasopharyngeal swab samples collected in the Republic of Moldova in June 2020 to September 2021 were determined. Little variability was observed in the early stages, when mostly clade 19A was circulating, followed by clade 20B. Later, multiple introductions of SARS-CoV-2 lineages B.1.1., B.1.1.7, and B.1.1.525 were detected. The B.1.1.7 lineage became predominant between December 2020 and June 2021, followed by the Delta variant.

4.
Frontiers in oncology ; 12, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2072780

ABSTRACT

Post-coronavirus disease 2019 (post-COVID-19) condition, previously referred to as long COVID, includes a post-acute syndrome defined by the presence of non-specific symptoms occurring usually 3 months from the onset of the acute phase and lasting at least 2 months. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represent a high-risk population for COVID-19. Moreover, the response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination is often absent or inadequate. The introduction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment landscape of COVID-19 allowed to reduce hospitalization and mortality in mild–moderate SARS-CoV-2 infection, but limited data are available in hematological patients. We here report the effective use of casirivimab/imdevimab (CI) in the treatment of two CLL patients with persistent infection and post-COVID-19 condition. Full genome sequencing of viral RNA from nasopharyngeal swabs was performed at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis and before the administration of CI. Both patients experienced persistent SARS-CoV-2 infection with no seroconversion for 8 and 7 months, respectively, associated with COVID symptoms. In both cases after the infusion of CI, we observed a rapid negativization of the nasal swabs, the resolution of post-COVID-19 condition, and the development of both the IgG against the trimeric spike protein and the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein. The analysis of the viral genome in the period elapsed from the time of COVID-19 diagnosis and the administration of mAbs showed the development of new mutations, especially in the S gene. The genome variations observed during the time suggest a role of persistent SARS-CoV-2 infection as a possible source for the development of viral variants. The effects observed in these two patients appeared strongly related to passive immunity conferred by CI treatment permitting SARS-CoV-2 clearance and resolution of post-COVID-19 condition. On these grounds, passive anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody treatment may represent as a possible therapeutic option in some patients with persistent SARS-CoV-2 infection.

5.
preprints.org; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-PREPRINTS.ORG | ID: ppzbmed-10.20944.preprints202207.0335.v1

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2), etiological agent of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has spread since December 2019, resulting in massive health and economic crisis worldwide. While efforts to stop the pandemic are crucial, collecting epidemiological data to help manage current and future pandemics will be important. In addition to humans, serological and molecular based studies have demonstrated SARS CoV-2 exposure in several wild, domestic and farmed animals. For examples Shriner and the team showed serologically an exposure of 40% to the white deer living in close proximity to urban centers. Additional reports have also emerged of susceptibility of animal’s species like cats, ferrets, raccoon dogs, cynomolgus macaques, rhesus macaques, white-tailed deer, rabbits, Egyptian fruit bats, and Syrian hamsters to SARS-CoV-2 infection.. It’s worth emphasizing that these reports are based on experimental data mostly derived from Europe, USA, South America and parts of Asia. In limited instances natural infections of SARS-CoV-2 have been reported in pet dogs, cats, tigers, lions, snow leopards, pumas, gorillas at zoos and farmed mink and ferrets. The presence of the virus in animal species and an understanding of whether these are natural or recent human to animal transmissions is important. It’s possible that such transmission could passage the virus or subject the virus to a different immunological pressure thereby helping with the development of viral variants in addition to being a host for future reservoirs of the virus. In Kenya SARS-CoV-2 was first detected on March 12th 2020 from imported human cases of persons who had travelled from the United States. This was followed by detection of imported cases majorly from China, Sweden and United Kingdom. Later infections were confirmed in Nairobi and Mombasa suggesting further cases of disease importations through the major ports of entry. However, no comparable data on animal exposure have hitherto been generated in Kenya. To address this key concern, we focused on three objectives; 1) development of a robust antibody ELISA based on crude SARS-CoV-2 lysate. 2) SARS-CoV-2 serology of domestic animals in Kenya. 3) Corroboration of the crude lysate based seroprevalence data and a commercial ELISA kit based on the Spike receptor binding domain (RBD) antigen. Our sample set included camel sera (both pre- & post outbreak sera), as well as sera from cats and dogs collected at the peak of the pandemic. Our results using the ELISA based on crude SARS-CoV-2 lysate indicated SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in camels (71%, N=145), cats 11% (N=16) and dogs (81%, N=36) with varying titer levels. These findings were comparable to those obtained using the commercial ELISA kit based on the spike RBD antigens. In summary, the data warrants two key conclusions: (i) we have demonstrated that the crude lysate ELISA allows for SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection, and given its potential to offer robust detection could be applied for initial mass screening (ii) although the current study cannot disentangle the relative contributions of antigenic cross-reactivity, pre-pandemic exposure to SARS-CoV-2 or human-animal transmission, it nonetheless demonstrates for the first time the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 like antibodies in domestic and wild animals in Kenya. Our findings set the scene for further research into the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in domestic and wild animals to understand their potential epidemiological implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19
6.
Viruses ; 14(6)2022 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869816

ABSTRACT

Pyridobenzothiazolone derivatives are a promising class of broad-spectrum antivirals. However, the mode of action of these compounds remains poorly understood. The HeE1-17Y derivative has already been shown to be a potent compound against a variety of flaviviruses of global relevance. In this work, the mode of action of HeE1-17Y has been studied for West Nile virus taking advantage of reporter replication particles (RRPs). Viral infectivity was drastically reduced by incubating the compound with the virus before infection, thus suggesting a direct interaction with the viral particles. Indeed, RRPs incubated with the inhibitor appeared to be severely compromised in electron microscopy analysis. HeE1-17Y is active against other enveloped viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, but not against two non-enveloped viruses, suggesting a virucidal mechanism that involves the alteration of the viral membrane.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Flavivirus , RNA Viruses , Viruses , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
authorea preprints; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-AUTHOREA PREPRINTS | ID: ppzbmed-10.22541.au.165350167.76171029.v1

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2), etiological agent of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has spread since December 2019, resulting in massive health and economic crisis worldwide. While efforts to stop the pandemic are crucial, collecting epidemiological data to help manage current and future pandemics will be important. In addition to humans, serological and molecular based studies have demonstrated SARS CoV-2 exposure in several wild, domestic and farmed animals. For examples Shriner and the team showed serologically an exposure of 40% to the white deer living in close proximity to urban centers. Additional reports have also emerged of susceptibility of animal’s species like cats, ferrets, raccoon dogs, cynomolgus macaques, rhesus macaques, white-tailed deer, rabbits, Egyptian fruit bats, and Syrian hamsters to SARS-CoV-2 infection.. It’s worth emphasizing that these reports are based on experimental data mostly derived from Europe, USA, South America and parts of Asia. In limited instances natural infections of SARS-CoV-2 have been reported in pet dogs, cats, tigers, lions, snow leopards, pumas, gorillas at zoos and farmed mink and ferrets. The presence of the virus in animal species and an understanding of whether these are natural or recent human to animal transmissions is important. It’s possible that such transmission could passage the virus or subject the virus to a different immunological pressure thereby helping with the development of viral variants in addition to being a host for future reservoirs of the virus. In Kenya SARS-CoV-2 was first detected on March 12 2020 from imported human cases of persons who had travelled from the United States. This was followed by detection of imported cases majorly from China, Sweden and United Kingdom. Later infections were confirmed in Nairobi and Mombasa suggesting further cases of disease importations through the major ports of entry. However, no comparable data on animal exposure have hitherto been generated in Kenya. To address this key concern, we focused on three objectives; 1) development of a robust antibody ELISA based on crude SARS-CoV-2 lysate. 2) SARS-CoV-2 serology of domestic animals in Kenya. 3) Corroboration of the crude lysate based seroprevalence data and a commercial ELISA kit based on the Spike receptor binding domain (RBD) antigen. Our sample set included camel sera (both pre- & post outbreak sera), as well as sera from cats and dogs collected at the peak of the pandemic. Our results using the ELISA based on crude SARS-CoV-2 lysate indicated SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in camels (71%, N=145), cats 11% (N=16) and dogs (81%, N=36) with varying titer levels.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , LEOPARD Syndrome , COVID-19
8.
Environ Int ; 164: 107272, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814398

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of aerosol-based transmission of human pathogens; this therefore calls for novel medical devices which are able to sterilize contaminated aerosols. Here we describe a new laser device able to sterilize droplets containing either viruses or bacteria. Using engineered viral particles, we determined the 10,600 nm wavelength as the most efficient and exploitable laser source to be manufactured in a commercial device. Given the lack of existing working models to reproduce a human aerosol containing living microbial particles, we developed a new system mimicking human droplet formation and preserving bacterial and viral viability. This evidenced the efficacy of 10,600 nm laser light to kill two aerosol transmitted human pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and SARS-CoV-2. The minimal exposure time of <15 ms was required for the inactivation of over 99% pathogens in the aerosol; this is a key element in the design of a device that is safe and can be used in preventing inter-individual transmission. This represents a major advantage over existing devices, which mainly aim at either purifying incoming air by filters or sterilizing solid surfaces, which are not the major transmission routes for airborne communicable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aerosols , Humans , Lasers , Pandemics , Sterilization
9.
Protein Expr Purif ; 194: 106071, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676879

ABSTRACT

Reliable diagnosis is critical to identify infections of SARS-CoV-2 as well as to evaluate the immune response to virus and vaccines. Consequently, it becomes crucial the isolation of sensitive antibodies to use as immunocapture elements of diagnostic tools. The final bottleneck to achieve these results is the availability of enough antigen of good quality. We have established a robust pipeline for the production of recombinant, functional SARS-CoV-2 Spike receptor binding domain (RBD) at high yield and low cost in culture flasks. RBD was expressed in transiently transfected ExpiCHO cells at 32 °C and 5% CO2 and purified up to 40 mg/L. The progressive protein accumulation in the culture medium was monitored with an immunobinding assay in order to identify the optimal collection time. Successively, a two-step chromatographic protocol enabled its selective purification in the monomeric state. RBD quality assessment was positively evaluated by SDS-PAGE, Western Blotting and Mass Spectrometry, while Bio-Layer Interferometry, flow cytometer and ELISA tests confirmed its functionality. This effective protocol for the RBD production in transient eukaryotic system can be immediately extended to the production of RBD mutants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Viral , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
10.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 11(2): e0118221, 2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673355

ABSTRACT

The coding-complete severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genome sequences from 15 nasopharyngeal swabs collected in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, during the period from December 2020 to March 2021 were determined using Illumina MiSeq technology. A sequence analysis identified that the B.1 SARS-CoV-2 lineage was most prevalent with the worrying emergence of B.1.1.7 in June 2021.

11.
COVID ; 1(4):784-789, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1580970

ABSTRACT

Quick and reliable identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in the population is required to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. This is a prospective observational study of diagnostic accuracy. Paired swab samples from 317 asymptomatic individuals referring to a drive-in testing facility were tested in parallel by means of the rapid antigen test developed by Jiangsu Bioperfectus Technologies and routine nucleic acid detection. Overall specificity was 100% and sensitivity was 49% but reached 87% at higher viral loads (Ct < 25). In this study, the antigen detection test showed high specificity and good sensitivity in asymptomatic individuals carrying higher viral loads. The assay performance worsened with lower viral loads, making it useful when a rapidly deployable test is essential and to assess a potential risk of immediate transmission in the community, but not recommended for testing asymptomatic individuals.

12.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(47): e0095221, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532971

ABSTRACT

Here, we report the genome sequences of five severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strains that were obtained from symptomatic individuals with travel histories during community surveillance in the Dominican Republic in 2020. These sequences provide a starting point for further genomic studies of gene flow and molecular diversity in the Caribbean nation. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that all genomes correspond to the B.1 variant.

13.
Med Lav ; 112(5): 331-339, 2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid antibody test were investigated for the screening of healthcare workers. METHODS: the serum of 389 health care workers exposed to COVID-19 patients or with symptoms, were analysed. All workers underwent monthly the screening for SARS-CoV-2 with detection of viral RNA in nasopharyngeal swabs by RT-PCR. IgG antibody detection in serum was performed by Chemiluminescence Immunoassay (CLIA) and by the Rapid test (KHB diagnostic kit for SARS CoV-2 IgM/IgG antibody after a median of 7.6 weeks (25°-75° percentiles 6.6-11.5). RESULTS: the rapid test resulted positive in 31/132 (23.5%), 16/135 (11.8%) and 0/122 cases in COVID-19 positive individuals, in those with only SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies and in those negative for both tests, respectively. Sensitivity was 17.6% (CI95% 13.2-22.7) and 23.5% (CI95% 16.5-31.6), and specificity was 100% (CI95% 97-100) and 100% (CI95% 97-100) considering Rapid test vs CLIA IgG or Rapid test vs SARS-CoV-2 positive RNA detection, respectively. CONCLUSION: the KHB Rapid test is not suitable for the screening of workers with previous COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
14.
FEBS J ; 288(17): 4992-4995, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393881

ABSTRACT

In this Editorial, we highlight the contents of The FEBS Journal's second Special Issue focussed on COVID-19. The issue covers a variety of aspects related to COVID-19, ranging from the most recent improvements in therapies and the significant impact of rapidly developed COVID-19 vaccines to the emergence of variants of SARS-CoV-2, the role of the immune system in the various stages of the disease and the impact of the disease in different organs. We hope that this collection of articles will give readers an informative and critical perspective on recent advances in understanding and treating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Disease Management , Humans , Immune System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
15.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 489, 2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387493

ABSTRACT

We investigated SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics in Italy, one of the countries hit hardest by the pandemic, using phylodynamic analysis of viral genetic and epidemiological data. We observed the co-circulation of multiple SARS-CoV-2 lineages over time, which were linked to multiple importations and characterized by large transmission clusters concomitant with a high number of infections. Subsequent implementation of a three-phase nationwide lockdown strategy greatly reduced infection numbers and hospitalizations. Yet we present evidence of sustained viral spread among sporadic clusters acting as "hidden reservoirs" during summer 2020. Mathematical modelling shows that increased mobility among residents eventually catalyzed the coalescence of such clusters, thus driving up the number of infections and initiating a new epidemic wave. Our results suggest that the efficacy of public health interventions is, ultimately, limited by the size and structure of epidemic reservoirs, which may warrant prioritization during vaccine deployment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Genome, Viral/genetics , Mutation , Public Health/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Geography , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Public Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
16.
EClinicalMedicine ; 40: 101101, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Management and control of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is critically dependent on quick and reliable identification of the virus in clinical specimens. Detection of viral RNA by a colorimetric reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) is a simple, reliable and cost-effective assay, deployable in resource-limited settings (RLS). Our objective was to evaluate the intrinsic and extrinsic performances of RT-LAMP in RLS. METHODS: This is a multicenter prospective observational study of diagnostic accuracy, conducted from October 2020 to February 2021 in four African Countries: Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya and Nigeria; and in Italy. We enroled 1657 individuals who were either COVID-19 suspect cases, or asymptomatic and presented for screening. RNA extracted from pharyngeal swabs was tested in parallel by a colorimetric RT-LAMP and by a standard real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). FINDINGS: The sensitivity and specificity of index RT LAMP compared to standard RT-PCR on 1657 prospective specimens from infected individuals was determined. For a subset of 1292 specimens, which underwent exactly the same procedures in different countries, we obtained very high specificity (98%) and positive predictive value (PPV = 99%), while the sensitivity was 87%, with a negative predictive value NPV = 70%, Stratification of RT-PCR data showed superior sensitivity achieved with an RT-PCR cycle threshold (Ct) below 35 (97%), which decreased to 60% above 35. INTERPRETATION: In this field trial, RT-LAMP appears to be a reliable assay, comparable to RT-PCR, particularly with medium-high viral loads (Ct < 35). Hence, RT-LAMP can be deployed in RLS for timely management and prevention of COVID-19, without compromising the quality of output.

18.
Viruses ; 13(5)2021 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217120

ABSTRACT

Repurposing clinically available drugs to treat the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an urgent need in the course of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, as very few treatment options are available. The iminosugar Miglustat is a well-characterized drug for the treatment of rare genetic lysosome storage diseases, such as Gaucher and Niemann-Pick type C, and has also been described to be active against a variety of enveloped viruses. The activity of Miglustat is here demonstrated in the micromolar range for SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. The drug acts at the post-entry level and leads to a marked decrease of viral proteins and release of infectious viruses. The mechanism resides in the inhibitory activity toward α-glucosidases that are involved in the early stages of glycoprotein N-linked oligosaccharide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to a marked decrease of the viral Spike protein. Indeed, the antiviral potential of protein glycosylation inhibitors against SARS-CoV-2 is further highlighted by the low-micromolar activity of the investigational drug Celgosivir. These data point to a relevant role of this approach for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
1-Deoxynojirimycin/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Repositioning , Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Indolizines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , 1-Deoxynojirimycin/pharmacology , A549 Cells , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Glycosylation/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Release/drug effects , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
19.
Antiviral Res ; 189: 105055, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126674

ABSTRACT

The current emergency of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV2 urged the need for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs as the first line of treatment. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that already challenged humanity in at least two other previous outbreaks and are likely to be a constant threat for the future. In this work we developed a pipeline based on in silico docking of known drugs on SARS-CoV1/2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase combined with in vitro antiviral assays on both SARS-CoV2 and the common cold human coronavirus HCoV-OC43. Results showed that certain drugs displayed activity for both viruses at a similar inhibitory concentration, while others were specific. In particular, the antipsychotic drug lurasidone and the antiviral drug elbasvir showed promising activity in the low micromolar range against both viruses with good selectivity index.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzofurans/pharmacology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Drug Repositioning , Imidazoles/pharmacology , Lurasidone Hydrochloride/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Computer Simulation , Fibroblasts , Humans , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
20.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(4)2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117311

ABSTRACT

The coding-complete genome sequence of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strain isolated from an Iraqi patient was sequenced for the first-time using Illumina MiSeq technology. There was a D614G mutation in the spike protein-coding sequence. This report is valuable for better understanding the spread of the virus in Iraq.

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