Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 36
Filter
1.
Journal of Clinical Medicine ; 11(9):2592, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1820313

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Although COVID-19 is largely a respiratory disease, it is actually a systemic disease that has a wide range of effects that are not yet fully known. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, predictors and outcome of non-hepatic hyperammonemia (NHH) in COVID-19 in intensive care unit (ICU);(2) Methods: This is a 3-month prospective observational study in a third-level COVID-19 hospital. The authors collected demographic, clinical, severity score and outcome data. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of NHH;(3) Results: 156 COVID-19 patients were admitted to the ICU. The incidence of NHH was 12.2% (19 patients). The univariate analysis showed that invasive mechanical ventilation had a 6.6-fold higher risk (OR 6.66, 95% CI 0.86–51.6, p = 0.039) for NHH, while in the multiple regression analysis, there was a 7-fold higher risk for NHH—but it was not statistically significant (OR 7.1, 95% CI 0.90–56.4, p = 0.062). Demographics, clinical characteristics and mortality in the ICU at 28 days did not show a significant association with NHH. (4) Conclusions: The incidence of NHH in ICU COVID-19 patients was not low. NHH did not appear to significantly increase mortality, and all patients with non-hepatic hyperammonemia were successfully treated without further complications. However, the pathogenesis of NHH in ICU patients with COVID-19 remains a topic to be explored with further research.

3.
J Clin Med ; 11(6)2022 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is conflicting evidence for how HIV influences COVID-19 infection. The aim of this study was to compare characteristics at presentation and the clinical outcomes of people living with HIV (PLWH) versus HIV-negative patients (non-PLWH) hospitalized with COVID-19. METHODS: Primary endpoint: time until invasive ventilation/death. Secondary endpoints: time until ventilation/death, time until symptoms resolution. RESULTS: A total of 1647 hospitalized patients were included (43 (2.6%) PLWH, 1604 non-PLWH). PLWH were younger (55 vs. 61 years) and less likely to be with PaO2/FiO2 < 300 mmHg compared with non-PLWH. Among PLWH, nadir of CD4 was 185 (75-322) cells/µL; CD4 at COVID-19 diagnosis was 272 cells/µL (127-468) and 77% of these were virologically suppressed. The cumulative probability of invasive mechanical ventilation/death at day 15 was 4.7% (95%CI 1.2-17.3) in PLWH versus 18.9% (16.9-21.1) in non-PLWH (p = 0.023). The cumulative probability of non-invasive/invasive ventilation/death at day 15 was 20.9% (11.5-36.4) in PLWH versus 37.6% (35.1-40.2) in non-PLWH (p = 0.044). The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of invasive mechanical ventilation/death of PLWH was 0.49 (95% CI 0.12-1.96, p = 0.310) versus non-PLWH; similarly, aHR of non-invasive/invasive ventilation/death of PLWH was 1.03 (95% CI 0.53-2.00, p = 0.926). CONCLUSION: A less-severe presentation of COVID-19 at hospitalization was observed in PLWH compared to non-PLWH; no difference in clinical outcomes could be detected.

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323308

ABSTRACT

Prophylactic low molecular weight heparin (pLMWH) is currently recommended in COVID-19 to reduce the risk of coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the antinflammatory effects of pLMWH could translate in lower rate of clinical progression in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.Patients admitted to a COVID-hospital in Rome with SARS-CoV-2 infection and mild/moderate pneumonia were retrospectively evaluated. The primary endpoint was the time from hospital admission to orotracheal intubation/death (OTI/death). A total of 449 patients were included: 39% female, median age 63 (IQR, 50-77) years. The estimated probability of OTI/death for patients receiving pLMWH was: 9.5% (95%CI 3.2-26.4) by day 20 in those not receiving pLMWH vs. 10.4% (6.7-15.9) in those exposed to pLMWH;p-value=0.144. This risk associated with the use of pLMWH appeared to vary by PaO2/FiO2 ratio: aHR 1.40 (95%CI 0.51-3.79) for patients with an admission PaO2/FiO2 < 300 mmHg and 0.27 (0.03-2.18) for those with PaO2/FiO2 >300 mmHg;p-value at interaction test 0.16. pLMWH does not seem to reduce the risk of OTI/death mild/moderate COVID-19 pneumonia, especially when respiratory function had already significantly deteriorated. Data from clinical trials comparing the effect of prophylactic vs. therapeutic dosage of LMWH at various stages of COVID-19 disease are needed.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322655

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Benefits and timing of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) COVID-19 patients are still controversial. PDT is considered a high risk procedure for transmission of SARS CoV-2 to health care workers (HCWs). The present study analyzed optimal timing of PDT, clinical outcomes of patients undergoing PDT and safety of HCWs performing PDT. (2) Methods: 133 COVID-19 patients underwent PDT in our ICU from April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021, 23 patients were excluded and 110 patients were enrolled. A trained medical team was dedicated to the PDT procedure. Demographic, clinical history and outcome data were collected. Patients who underwent PDT were stratified into two groups: early group, PDT ≤12 days from orotracheal-intubation (OTI) and late group, &gt;12 days from OTI;HCW surveillance program was performed. (3) Results: Early group included 57 patients and late group included 53 patients. Early group patients showed shorter ICU length of stay and fewer days of mechanical ventilation than the late group (p&lt;0.001). At day 7 after tracheostomy, early group patients required fewer intravenous anesthetic drugs and experienced an improvement of ventilation parameters, PaO2/FiO2-Ratio, PEEP and FiO2 (p&lt;0.001). No difference in case fatality ratio between the two groups was reported. No SARS-CoV-2 infection was reported in HCWs performing PDT. (4) Conclusions: PDT was safe and effective for COVID-19 patients, since it improved respiratory support parameters, reduced ICU length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation, and optimized the weaning process. The procedure was safe for all HCWs involved in the dedicated medical team. The development of standardized early PDT protocols should be implemented and PDT procedure could be considered as first line approach in ICU COVID-19 requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation.

6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-314865

ABSTRACT

Background: More detailed temporal analyses of complete (Full) blood count (CBC) parameters, their evolution and relationship to patient age, gender, co-morbidities and management outcomes in survivors and non-survivors with COVID-19 disease could help identify prognostic clinical biomarkers. Methods: From 29 January 2020 until 28 March 2020, we performed a longitudinal cohort study of COVID-19 inpatients at the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy. Nine CBC parameters as a continuous variable were studied [neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, platelets, mean platelet volume, red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, mean red blood cell volume and red blood cell distribution width (RDW %)]. Model-based punctual estimates and difference between survivors and non-survivors, overall, and by co-morbidities, at specific times after symptoms, with relative 95% CI and P-values were obtained by marginal prediction and ANOVA-style joint tests. All analyses were carried out by STATA 15 statistical package. Main Findings: 379 COVID-19 patients [273 (72% were male;mean age was 61.67 (SD 15.60)] were enrolled and 1,805 measures per parameter were analysed. Neutrophil counts were on average significantly higher in non-survivors than in survivors (P<0.001) and lymphocytes were on average higher in survivors (P<0.001). These differences were time dependent. Reverse temporal trends were observed for lymphocyte and neutrophil counts in survivors and non-survivors. Average platelets counts (P<0.001) and median platelets volume (P<0.001) were significantly different in survivors and in non-survivors. The differences were time dependent and consistent with acute inflammation followed either by recovery or by death. Anaemia with anisocytosis were observed in the later phase of COVID-19 disease in non-survivors only. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with diabetes (p=0.005), obesity (p=0.010), chronic renal failure (p=0.001), COPD (p=0.033) cardiovascular diseases (p=0.001) and those >60 years(p=0.001). Age (p=0.042), obesity (p=0.002), chronic renal failure (p=0.002) and cardiovascular diseases (p=0.009) were independently associated with poor patient clinical outcome at 30 day after symptom onset. Interpretation: Increased neutrophil counts, reduced lymphocyte counts, higher median platelet volume, anemia with anisocytosis, in association with obesity, chronic renal failure, COPD, cardiovascular diseases and age >60 years predict poor prognosis in COVID19 patients.Funding Statement: Ricerca Corrente e Finalizzata Italy Ministry of Health, AIRC (IG2018-21880);Regione Lazio (Gruppi di ricerca, E56C18000460002).Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interest.Ethics Approval Statement: This study was approved by the IRB of Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani” (INMI), in Rome (Italy).

7.
J Clin Med ; 10(23)2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566682

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: COVID-19 is a novel cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Indeed, with the increase of ARDS cases due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there has also been an increase in the incidence of cases with pneumothorax (PNX) and pneumomediastinum (PNM). However, the incidence and the predictors of PNX/PMN in these patients are currently unclear and even conflicting. (2) Methods: The present observational study analyzed the incidence of barotrauma (PNX/PNM) in COVID-19 patients with moderate-severe ARDS hospitalized in a year of the pandemic, also focusing on the three waves occurring during the year, and treated with positive-pressure ventilation (PPV). We collected demographic and clinical data. (3) Results: During this period, 40 patients developed PNX/PNM. The overall incidence of barotrauma in all COVID-19 patients hospitalized in a year was 1.6%, and in those with moderate-severe ARDS in PPV was 7.2% and 3.8 events per 1000 positive-pressure ventilator days. The incidence of barotrauma in moderate-severe ARDS COVID-19 patients during the three waves was 7.8%, 7.4%, and 8.7%, respectively. Treatment with noninvasive respiratory support alone was associated with an incidence of barotrauma of 9.1% and 2.6 events per 1000 noninvasive ventilator days, of which 95% were admitted to the ICU after the event, due to a worsening of respiratory parameters. The incidence of barotrauma of ICU COVID-19 patients in invasive ventilation over a year was 5.8% and 2.7 events per 1000 invasive ventilator days. There was no significant difference in demographics and clinical features between the barotrauma and non-barotrauma group. The mortality was higher in the barotrauma group (17 patients died, 47.2%) than in the non-barotrauma group (170 patients died, 37%), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.429). (4) Conclusions: The incidence of PNX/PNM in moderate-severe ARDS COVID-19 patients did not differ significantly between the three waves over a year, and does not appear to be very different from that in ARDS patients in the pre-COVID era. The barotrauma does not appear to significantly increase mortality in COVID-19 patients with moderate-severe ARDS if protective ventilation strategies are applied. Attention should be paid to the risk of barotrauma in COVID-19 patients in noninvasive ventilation because the event increases the probability of admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and intubation.

8.
J Clin Med ; 10(23)2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542621

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: COVID-19 is a novel cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Indeed, with the increase of ARDS cases due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there has also been an increase in the incidence of cases with pneumothorax (PNX) and pneumomediastinum (PNM). However, the incidence and the predictors of PNX/PMN in these patients are currently unclear and even conflicting. (2) Methods: The present observational study analyzed the incidence of barotrauma (PNX/PNM) in COVID-19 patients with moderate-severe ARDS hospitalized in a year of the pandemic, also focusing on the three waves occurring during the year, and treated with positive-pressure ventilation (PPV). We collected demographic and clinical data. (3) Results: During this period, 40 patients developed PNX/PNM. The overall incidence of barotrauma in all COVID-19 patients hospitalized in a year was 1.6%, and in those with moderate-severe ARDS in PPV was 7.2% and 3.8 events per 1000 positive-pressure ventilator days. The incidence of barotrauma in moderate-severe ARDS COVID-19 patients during the three waves was 7.8%, 7.4%, and 8.7%, respectively. Treatment with noninvasive respiratory support alone was associated with an incidence of barotrauma of 9.1% and 2.6 events per 1000 noninvasive ventilator days, of which 95% were admitted to the ICU after the event, due to a worsening of respiratory parameters. The incidence of barotrauma of ICU COVID-19 patients in invasive ventilation over a year was 5.8% and 2.7 events per 1000 invasive ventilator days. There was no significant difference in demographics and clinical features between the barotrauma and non-barotrauma group. The mortality was higher in the barotrauma group (17 patients died, 47.2%) than in the non-barotrauma group (170 patients died, 37%), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.429). (4) Conclusions: The incidence of PNX/PNM in moderate-severe ARDS COVID-19 patients did not differ significantly between the three waves over a year, and does not appear to be very different from that in ARDS patients in the pre-COVID era. The barotrauma does not appear to significantly increase mortality in COVID-19 patients with moderate-severe ARDS if protective ventilation strategies are applied. Attention should be paid to the risk of barotrauma in COVID-19 patients in noninvasive ventilation because the event increases the probability of admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and intubation.

9.
J Clin Med ; 10(18)2021 Sep 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection present a hypercoagulable condition. Anticoagulant therapy is currently recommended to reduce thrombotic risk, leading to potentially severe complications like spontaneous bleeding (SB). Percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization (PTAE) can be life-saving in critical patients, in addition to medical therapy. We report a major COVID-19 Italian Research Hospital experience during the pandemic, with particular focus on indications and technique of embolization. METHODS: We retrospectively included all subjects with SB and with a microbiologically confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, over one year of pandemic, selecting two different groups: (a) patients treated with PTAE and medical therapy; (b) patients treated only with medical therapy. Computed tomography (CT) scan findings, clinical conditions, and biological findings were collected. RESULTS: 21/1075 patients presented soft tissue SB with an incidence of 1.95%. 10/21 patients were treated with PTAE and medical therapy with a 30-days survival of 70%. Arterial blush, contrast late enhancement, and dimensions at CT scan were found discriminating for the embolization (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: PTAE is an important tool in severely ill, bleeding COVID-19 patients. The decision for PTAE of COVID-19 patients must be carefully weighted with particular attention paid to the clinical and biological condition, hematoma location and volume.

10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 690322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403471

ABSTRACT

A convalescent, non-severe, patient with COVID-19 was enrolled as a hyper-immune plasma voluntary donor by the Immuno-Hematology and Transfusion Unit of the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute in Rome, under the TSUNAMI national study criteria. During a nearly 6-month period (May-October 2020), the patient was closely monitored and underwent four hyperimmune plasma collections. Serum SARS-CoV-2 (anti-S + anti-N) IgG and IgM, anti-S1 IgA, and neutralizing titers (NTs) were measured. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels steadily decreased. No correlation was found between anti-S/anti-N IgG and IgM levels and viral NT, measured by either a microneutralization test or the surrogate RBD/ACE2-binding inhibition test. Conversely, NTs directly correlated with anti-S1 IgA levels. Hyperimmune donor plasma, administered to five SARS-CoV-2 patients with persistent, severe COVID-19 symptoms, induced short-term clinical and pathological improvement. Reported data suggest that high NTs can persist longer than expected, thus widening hyperimmune plasma source, availability, and potential use. In vitro RBD/ACE2-binding inhibition test is confirmed as a convenient surrogate index for neutralizing activity and patients' follow-up, suitable for clinical settings where biosafety level 3 facilities are not available. IgA levels may correlate with serum neutralizing activity and represent a further independent index for patient evaluation.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Viral/administration & dosage , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Blood Donors , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin A/administration & dosage , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
11.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390541

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 presents with a wide range of clinical neurological manifestations. It has been recognized that SARS-CoV-2 infection affects both the central and peripheral nervous system, leading to smell and taste disturbances; acute ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease; encephalopathies and seizures; and causes most surviving patients to have long lasting neurological symptoms. Despite this, typical neuropathological features associated with the infection have still not been identified. Studies of post-mortem examinations of the cerebral cortex are obtained with difficulty due to laboratory safety concerns. In addition, they represent cases with different neurological symptoms, age or comorbidities, thus a larger number of brain autoptic data from multiple institutions would be crucial. Histopathological findings described here are aimed to increase the current knowledge on neuropathology of COVID-19 patients. We report post-mortem neuropathological findings of ten COVID-19 patients. A wide range of neuropathological lesions were seen. The cerebral cortex of all patients showed vascular changes, hyperemia of the meninges and perivascular inflammation in the cerebral parenchyma with hypoxic neuronal injury. Perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of predominantly CD8-positive T cells mixed with CD68-positive macrophages, targeting the disrupted vascular wall in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons were seen. Our findings support recent reports highlighting a role of microvascular injury in COVID-19 neurological manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cerebral Cortex/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , Brain Diseases/pathology , Brain Diseases/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Cerebral Cortex/virology , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Macrophages/pathology , Male , Microvessels/pathology , Microvessels/virology , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
Cells ; 10(8)2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360725

ABSTRACT

Massive platelet activation and thrombotic events characterize severe COVID-19, highlighting their critical role in SARS-CoV-2-induced immunopathology. Since there is a well-described expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in severe COVID-19, we evaluated their possible role in platelet activation during SARS-CoV-2 infection. During COVID-19, a lower plasmatic L-arginine level was observed compared to healthy donors, which correlated with MDSC frequency. Additionally, activated GPIIb/IIIa complex (PAC-1) expression was higher on platelets from severe COVID-19 patients compared to healthy controls and inversely correlated with L-arginine plasmatic concentration. Notably, MDSC were able to induce PAC-1 expression in vitro by reducing L-arginine concentration, indicating a direct role of PMN-MDSC in platelet activation. Accordingly, we found a positive correlation between ex vivo platelet PAC-1 expression and PMN-MDSC frequency. Overall, our data demonstrate the involvement of PMN-MDSC in triggering platelet activation during COVID-19, highlighting a novel role of MDSC in driving COVID-19 pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Arginine/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Platelet Activation , Thrombosis/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arginine/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/physiology , Young Adult
13.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 244-251, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351698

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between sex hormones and the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Furthermore, associations between sex hormones and systemic inflammation markers, viral shedding and length of hospital stay were studied. DESIGN AND METHODS: This case-control study included a total of 48 male patients with COVID-19 admitted to an Italian reference hospital. The 24 cases were patients with PaO2/FiO2 <250 mmHg and who needed ventilatory support during hospitalization (severe COVID-19). The 24 controls were selected in a 1:1 ratio, matched by age, from patients who maintained PaO2/FiO2 >300 mmHg at all times and who may have required low-flow oxygen supplementation during hospitalization (mild COVID-19). For each group, sex hormones were evaluated on hospital admission. RESULTS: Patients with severe COVID-19 (cases) had a significantly lower testosterone level compared with patients with mild COVID-19 (controls). Median total testosterone (TT) was 1.4 ng/mL in cases and 3.5 ng/mL in controls (P = 0.005); median bioavailable testosterone (BioT) was 0.49 and 1.21 in cases and controls, respectively (P = 0.008); and median calculated free testosterone (cFT) was 0.029 ng/mL and 0.058 ng/mL in cases and controls, respectively (P = 0.015). Low TT, low cFT and low BioT were correlated with hyperinflammatory syndrome (P = 0.018, P = 0.048 and P = 0.020, respectively) and associated with longer length of hospital stay (P = 0.052, P = 0.041 and P = 0.023, respectively). No association was found between sex hormone level and duration of viral shedding, or between sex hormone level and mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: A low level of testosterone was found to be a marker of clinical severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Male , Testosterone , Virulence Factors
14.
J Clin Med ; 10(15)2021 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335120

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The benefits and timing of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) COVID-19 patients are still controversial. PDT is considered a high-risk procedure for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to healthcare workers (HCWs). The present study analyzed the optimal timing of PDT, the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing PDT, and the safety of HCWs performing PDT. METHODS: Of the 133 COVID-19 patients who underwent PDT in our ICU from 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021, 13 patients were excluded, and 120 patients were enrolled. A trained medical team was dedicated to the PDT procedure. Demographic, clinical history, and outcome data were collected. Patients who underwent PDT were stratified into two groups: an early group (PDT ≤ 12 days after orotracheal intubation (OTI) and a late group (>12 days after OTI). An HCW surveillance program was also performed. RESULTS: The early group included 61 patients and the late group included 59 patients. The early group patients had a shorter ICU length of stay and fewer days of mechanical ventilation than the late group (p < 0.001). On day 7 after tracheostomy, early group patients required fewer intravenous anesthetic drugs and experienced an improvement of the ventilation parameters PaO2/FiO2 ratio, PEEP, and FiO2 (p < 0.001). No difference in the case fatality ratio between the two groups was observed. No SARS-CoV-2 infections were reported in the HCWs performing the PDTs. CONCLUSIONS: PDT was safe and effective for COVID-19 patients since it improved respiratory support parameters, reduced ICU length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation, and optimized the weaning process. The procedure was safe for all HCWs involved in the dedicated medical team. The development of standardized early PDT protocols should be implemented, and PDT could be considered a first-line approach in ICU COVID-19 patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation.

15.
J Clin Med ; 10(15)2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325713

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The use of steroid therapy in patients within the context of SARS-CoV-2 infection is still a matter of debate. This study aimed to evaluate if potential steroid benefits could be predicted by the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2 in mmHg) to fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2) (P/F) in COVID-19 patients at admission. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records were retrospectively collected from all adult patients admitted because of COVID-19 from 29 January to 31 July 2020. The association of steroid therapy with 28-day all-cause mortality outcome was analysed in a multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for confounding factors. RESULTS: Overall, 511 patients were analysed, of which 39.1% underwent steroid therapy. Steroid treated patients were mostly male, older, and more frequently treated with antiviral drugs and aminoquinolines; the most common comorbidities were hypertension, followed by cardiovascular disease. Overall, 51 patients died within 28-days, and overall 28-days mortality was 19.5% in the cohort of patients exposed to steroids versus 3.9% mortality in unexposed patients (p < 0.001). Steroid therapy on patients with P/F ratio of 235 mmHg or higher at admission can be considered as detrimental, with an 8% increased probability of death. CONCLUSIONS: Steroid therapy is associated with increased 28-day mortality in COVID-19 in patients with mild or no ARDS.

16.
J Clin Med ; 10(14)2021 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314675

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has produced an extraordinary care setting where physicians played, and continue to play, a critical role in containing viral spread and treating affected patients. Frontline workers have been receiving day-to-day new information about therapeutic advances. The purpose of the study is to analyse COVID-19 drug consumption trends in both acute and intensive care settings comparing Defined Daily Doses and the release of scientific clinical data from January to December 2020.

17.
Viruses ; 12(10)2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: RT-PCR on nasopharyngeal (NPS)/oropharyngeal swabs is the gold standard for diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and viral load monitoring. Oral fluid (OF) is an alternate clinical sample, easy and safer to collect and could be useful for COVID-19 diagnosis, monitoring viral load and shedding. METHODS: Optimal assay conditions and analytical sensitivity were established for the commercial Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct assay adapted to OF matrix. The assay was used to test 337 OF and NPS specimens collected in parallel from 164 hospitalized patients; 50 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens from a subgroup of severe COVID-19 cases were also analysed. RESULTS: Using Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct on OF matrix, 100% analytical detection down to 1 TCID50/mL (corresponding to 4 × 103 copies (cp)/mL) was observed. No crossreaction with other viruses transmitted through the respiratory toute was observed. Parallel testing of 337 OF and NPS samples showed highly concordant results (κ = 0.831; 95 % CI = 0.771-0.891), and high correlation of Ct values (r = 0.921; p < 0.0001). High concordance and elevated correlation was observed also between OF and BAL. Prolonged viral RNA shedding was observed up to 100 days from symptoms onset (DSO), with 32% and 29% positivity observed in OF and NPS samples, respectively, collected between 60 and 100 DSO. CONCLUSIONS: Simplexa™ COVID-19 Direct assays on OF have high sensitivity and specificity to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA and provide an alternative to NPS for diagnosis and monitoring SARS-CoV-2 shedding.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Virus Shedding/physiology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Body Fluids/virology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Pandemics , Pharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling , Viral Load
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11334, 2021 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249212

ABSTRACT

Prophylactic low molecular weight heparin (pLMWH) is currently recommended in COVID-19 to reduce the risk of coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the antinflammatory effects of pLMWH could translate in lower rate of clinical progression in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Patients admitted to a COVID-hospital in Rome with SARS-CoV-2 infection and mild/moderate pneumonia were retrospectively evaluated. The primary endpoint was the time from hospital admission to orotracheal intubation/death (OTI/death). A total of 449 patients were included: 39% female, median age 63 (IQR, 50-77) years. The estimated probability of OTI/death for patients receiving pLMWH was: 9.5% (95% CI 3.2-26.4) by day 20 in those not receiving pLMWH vs. 10.4% (6.7-15.9) in those exposed to pLMWH; p-value = 0.144. This risk associated with the use of pLMWH appeared to vary by PaO2/FiO2 ratio: aHR 1.40 (95% CI 0.51-3.79) for patients with an admission PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 300 mmHg and 0.27 (0.03-2.18) for those with PaO2/FiO2 > 300 mmHg; p-value at interaction test 0.16. pLMWH does not seem to reduce the risk of OTI/death mild/moderate COVID-19 pneumonia, especially when respiratory function had already significantly deteriorated. Data from clinical trials comparing the effect of prophylactic vs. therapeutic dosage of LMWH at various stages of COVID-19 disease are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Rome , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Cells ; 10(5)2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223957

ABSTRACT

Liver injury in COVID-19 patients has progressively emerged, even in those without a history of liver disease, yet the mechanism of liver pathogenicity is still controversial. COVID-19 is frequently associated with increased serum ferritin levels, and hyperferritinemia was shown to correlate with illness severity. The liver is the major site for iron storage, and conditions of iron overload have been established to have a pathogenic role in development of liver diseases. We presented here six patients who developed severe COVID-19, with biochemical evidence of liver failure. Three cases were survived patients, who underwent liver biopsy; the other three were deceased patients, who were autopsied. None of the patients suffered underlying liver pathologies. Histopathological and ultrastructural analyses were performed. The most striking finding we demonstrated in all patients was iron accumulation into hepatocytes, associated with degenerative changes. Abundant ferritin particles were found enclosed in siderosomes, and large aggregates of hemosiderin were found, often in close contact with damaged mitochondria. Iron-caused oxidative stress may be responsible for mitochondria metabolic dysfunction. In agreement with this, association between mitochondria and lipid droplets was also found. Overall, our data suggest that hepatic iron overload could be the pathogenic trigger of liver injury associated to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Iron Overload/etiology , Liver Failure/etiology , Liver/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents , Biopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Ferritins/analysis , Hepatocytes/cytology , Hepatocytes/pathology , Humans , Iron/analysis , Iron/metabolism , Iron Overload/mortality , Iron Overload/pathology , Iron Overload/therapy , Liver/cytology , Liver/metabolism , Liver Failure/mortality , Liver Failure/pathology , Liver Failure/therapy , Liver Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/pathology , Positive-Pressure Respiration , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL