Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 21
Filter
1.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076012

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate the efficacy and safety of SpikoGen®, a subunit coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine composed of a recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spike protein with Advax-CpG55.2™ adjuvant. METHODS: This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trial was conducted on 16 876 participants randomized (3:1) to receive two intramuscular doses of SpikoGen® or a saline placebo 21 days apart. The primary outcome was to assess the efficacy of SpikoGen® in preventing symptomatic COVID-19. Secondary outcomes included safety assessments and evaluation of SpikoGen® vaccine's efficacy in preventing severe COVID-19. The study aimed for 147 COVID-19 symptomatic cases. RESULTS: Overall, 12 657 and 4219 participants were randomized to the SpikoGen® and placebo group and followed for a median of 55 days (interquartile range, 48-60 days) and 51 days (interquartile range, 46-58 days) after 14 days of the second dose, respectively. In the final per-protocol analysis, the number of COVID-19 cases was 247 of 9998 (2.4%) in the SpikoGen® group and 119 of 3069 (3.8%) in the placebo group. This equated to a vaccine efficacy of 43.99% (95% CI, 30.3-55.0%). The efficacy was calculated to be 44.22% (95% CI, 31.13-54.82%) among all participants who received both doses. From 2 weeks after the second dose, 5 of 9998 (0.05%) participants in the SpikoGen® group and 6 of 3069 (0.19%) participants in the placebo group developed severe COVID-19, equating to a vaccine efficacy against severe disease of 77.51% (95% CI, 26.3-93.1%). The SpikoGen® vaccine was well tolerated. DISCUSSION: A 2-dose regimen of SpikoGen® reduced the rate of COVID-19 and severe disease in the wave of the Delta variant.

2.
Health Science Reports ; 5(3), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1857799

ABSTRACT

IntroductionHematologic malignancies are risk factors for severe COVID‐19 infection. Identification of risk factors correlated with mortality in these groups of patients is important in the assessment strategy. We studied the characteristics of patients with hematologic malignancies and COVID‐19 and then analyzed the predictors of mortality.MethodsEligible for the analysis were hospitalized patients with hematologic malignancies and confirmed COVID‐19 infection observed between January 2020 and March 2021. Patients were categorized based on the type of malignancy and phase of the treatment.ResultsA total of 194 COVID‐19 infected patients with hematologic malignancies were included. The median age was 44 (15–81) years;135 of them were males and 59 were females. Acute myeloid leukemia was the most frequent cancer type (43.8%). A total of 119 patients had severe COVID‐19 and 61 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. A total of 92 deaths occurred in all cases for an overall case‐fatality rate of 47%. Male gender, preinduction and induction phase of the treatment, intensive care admission, low levels of oxygen saturation, Rhesus (RH) factor positivity, and higher fibrinogen level correlated with mortality.ConclusionThis study focuses on the epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes, and predictors of mortality of COVID‐19 among patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients with hematologic malignancies are at high risk of mortality.

3.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(3): e638, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858815

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hematologic malignancies are risk factors for severe COVID-19 infection. Identification of risk factors correlated with mortality in these groups of patients is important in the assessment strategy. We studied the characteristics of patients with hematologic malignancies and COVID-19 and then analyzed the predictors of mortality. Methods: Eligible for the analysis were hospitalized patients with hematologic malignancies and confirmed COVID-19 infection observed between January 2020 and March 2021. Patients were categorized based on the type of malignancy and phase of the treatment. Results: A total of 194 COVID-19 infected patients with hematologic malignancies were included. The median age was 44 (15-81) years; 135 of them were males and 59 were females. Acute myeloid leukemia was the most frequent cancer type (43.8%). A total of 119 patients had severe COVID-19 and 61 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. A total of 92 deaths occurred in all cases for an overall case-fatality rate of 47%. Male gender, preinduction and induction phase of the treatment, intensive care admission, low levels of oxygen saturation, Rhesus (RH) factor positivity, and higher fibrinogen level correlated with mortality. Conclusion: This study focuses on the epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes, and predictors of mortality of COVID-19 among patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients with hematologic malignancies are at high risk of mortality.

4.
Caspian J Intern Med ; 13(Suppl 3): 277-280, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856542

ABSTRACT

Background: The most common causes of immunodeficiency are iatrogenic and the result of the widespread use of therapies which modulates the immune system, whether they are planned or haphazardly. Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal disease which is usually secondary to immunosuppression, diabetic ketoacidosis, and long-term use of antibiotics, corticosteroids, and cytotoxic drugs. There are researches which show patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), especially severely ill or immunocompromised, are more likely to suffer from invasive fungal infections. Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk for severe COVID-19 outcomes. However, there has been no clear evidence on the relationship between pre-diabetes state and mucormycosis as a complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection so far. Case Presentation: Here, we report a case of sino-orbital mucormycosis in a pre-diabetic 54-year-old female without any underlying diseases. The patient suffered from COVID-19 pneumonia. She received 8 mg dexamethasone for 12 days. Afterwards, she returned three days after her discharge with a complaint of pre-orbital cellulitis, unilateral facial numbness and decreased visual acuity. Therefore, after primary diagnostic imaging, she was regarded as a candidate for invasive surgical intervention and was consequently treated with a combination of liposomal amphotericin B, radical recurrent surgery and posaconazole. Conclusion: It is very important to consider patients who are in the pre-diabetic state or possibly immunocompromised before prescribing steroids. The patients should be examined for invasive fungal infections in post-discharge period.

5.
Blood Purif ; : 1-9, 2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846591

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Uncontrolled overproduction of inflammatory mediators is predominantly observed in patients with severe COVID-19. The excessive immune response gives rise to multiple organ dysfunction. Implementing extracorporeal therapies may be useful in omitting inflammatory mediators and supporting different organ systems. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hemoperfusion in combination with standard therapy in critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHOD: We conducted a single-center, matched control retrospective study on patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. Patients were treated with hemoperfusion in combination with standard therapy (hemoperfusion group) or standard treatment (matched group). Hemoperfusion or hemoperfusion and continuous renal replacement therapies were initiated in the hemoperfusion group. The patients in the matched group were matched one by one with the hemoperfusion group for age, sex, oxygen saturation (SPO2) at the admission, and the frequency of using invasive mechanical ventilation during hospitalization. Two types of hemoperfusion cartridges used in this study were Jafron© (HA330) and CytoSorb® 300. RESULT: A total of 128 COVID-19-confirmed patients were enrolled in this study; 73 patients were allotted to the matched group and 55 patients received hemoperfusion. The median SPO2 at the admission day in the control and hemoperfusion groups was 80% and 75%, respectively (p value = 0.113). The mortality rate was significantly lower in the hemoperfusion group compared to the matched group (67.3% vs. 89%; p value = 0.002). The median length of ICU stay was statistically different in studied groups (median, 12 days for hemoperfusion group vs. 8 days for the matched group; p < 0.001). The median final SPO2 was statistically higher in the hemoperfusion group than in the matched group, and the median PaCO2 was lower. CONCLUSION: Among critically ill COVID-19 patients, based on our study, the use of hemoperfusion may reduce the mortality rate and improve SPO2 and PaCO2.

6.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 28(9): 1263-1271, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797042

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the immunogenicity and safety of SpikoGen®, a subunit COVID-19 vaccine composed of a recombinant prefusion-stabilized SARS-CoV-2 spike protein combined with the Advax-CpG55.2™ adjuvant, in seronegative and seropositive populations as primary vaccination. METHODS: This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase 2 trial was conducted on 400 participants randomized 3:1 to receive two doses of 25 µg of SpikoGen® 3 weeks apart or the placebo. The primary safety outcomes were the incidence of solicited adverse events up to 7 days after each dose and unsolicited adverse events up to 28 days after the second dose. The primary immunogenicity outcomes were seroconversion against the S1 protein and the geometric mean concentration of S1 antibodies by days 21 and 35. RESULTS: The SpikoGen® vaccine was well tolerated and no serious adverse events were recorded. The most common solicited adverse events were injection site pain and fatigue, largely graded as mild and transient. By day 35 (2 weeks post second dose), the seroconversion rate against S1 was 63.55 (95% CI: 57.81-69.01) in the SpikoGen® group versus 7.23 (95% CI: 2.7-15.07) in the placebo group. The geometric mean concentration of S1 antibodies was 29.12 (95% CI: 24.32-34.87) in the SpikoGen® group versus 5.53 (95% CI: 4.39-6.97) in the placebo group. Previously infected seropositive volunteers showed a large SARS-CoV-2 humoral response after a single SpikoGen® dose. DISCUSSION: SpikoGen® had an acceptable safety profile and induced promising humoral and cellular immune responses against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Inulin/analogs & derivatives , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccines, Subunit
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 832003, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785443

ABSTRACT

Estimating the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibody seropositivity among health care workers (HCWs) is crucial. In this study, the seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among HCWs of five hospitals of Tehran, Iran with high COVID-19 patient's referrals from April to June, 2020, was assessed. In this cross-sectional study, HCWs from three public and two private hospitals, selected randomly as a pilot, were included. Participants were asked questions on their demographic characteristics, medical history, hospital role, and usage of personal protective equipment (PPE). Iran FDA-approved SARS-CoV-2 ELISA kits were used to detect IgG and IgM antibodies in blood samples. The seroprevalence was estimated on the basis of ELISA test results and adjusted for test performance. Among the 2,065 participants, 1,825 (88.4%) and 240 (11.6%) HCWs were recruited from public and private hospitals, respectively. A total of 340 HCWs were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG or IgM antibodies, and 17.9% of seropositive individuals were asymptomatic. The overall test performance-adjusted seroprevalence estimate among HCWs was 22.6 (95% CI: 20.2-25.1), and PPE usage was significantly higher among HCWs of public vs. private hospitals (66.5 vs. 20.0%). This study found that seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 among HCWs was higher in private hospitals (37.0%; 95% CI: 28.6-46.2) than public hospitals (20.7%; 95% CI: 18.2-23.3), and also highest among assistant nurses and nurses, and lowest among janitor or superintendent categories. The PPE usage was especially suboptimal among HCWs in private hospitals. Continued effort in access to adequate PPE and regular screening of hospital staff for detecting asymptomatic personnel, especially during the upcoming wave of infection, are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Iran/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation , Seroepidemiologic Studies
8.
Clin Case Rep ; 10(3): e05518, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729109

ABSTRACT

In the COVID-19 pandemic, the overlap of clinical features between other viral infections makes a reliable diagnosis difficult in the initial stage of illness. We describe a confirmed case of CCHF in Tehran Province during this year, who was first misdiagnosed as COVID-19 infection.

9.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(5): e15416, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723136

ABSTRACT

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), is a type of delayed hypersensitivity reaction that requires urgent medical intervention. In the COVID-19 era, COVID-19 vaccines are currently being widely administered and mucocutaneous adverse reactions following vaccination have been reported; however, severe cutaneous adverse reactions associated with COVID-19 vaccines including SJS/TEN, are extremely rare. Herein, we describe a case of COVID-19 vaccination induced TEN which developed 1 day after receiving the first dose of Sinopharm COVID-19 vaccine with favorable clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stevens-Johnson Syndrome , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Skin , Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/diagnosis , Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/etiology , Vaccination
10.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1488-1493, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718393

ABSTRACT

Interferons are an essential part of the innate immune system and have antiviral and immunomodulatory functions. We studied the effects of interferon ß-1a on the outcomes of severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This retrospective study was conducted on hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Loghman-Hakim hospital from February 20, 2020 to April 20, 2020, Tehran, Iran. Patients were selected from two groups, the first group received interferon ß-1a in addition to the standard treatment regimen, and the second group received standard care. The clinical progression of two groups during their hospital admission was compared. We studied a total number of 395 hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Out of this number, 111 patients (33.5%) died (31.3% of the interferon ß-1a group and 34.1% of the control group). The mortality rate indicated no statistically significant difference between groups (p-value = 0.348), however for patients who were hospitalized for more than a week, the rate of mortality was lower in the interferon ß-1a group (p-value = 0.014). The median hospital stay was statistically longer for patients treated by interferon ß-1a (p-value < 0.001). The results of this study showed that interferon ß-1a can improve the outcomes of hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19, but more adequately-powered randomized controlled trials should be conducted.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Interferon beta-1a/therapeutic use , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Iran , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
11.
Infect Dis Clin Pract (Baltim Md) ; 29(6): e492, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528228
12.
Front Microbiol ; 12: 743048, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485075

ABSTRACT

The factors affecting the dynamics of lengthening of symptoms and serologic responses are not well known. In order to see how the serologic responses change in relation to the clinical features, we selected a group of 472 adults with a positive IgM/IgG antibody test result from a baseline study of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity, assessed their COVID-19 and past medical histories, and followed them up in about 3 months. Nearly one-fourth of the subjects were asymptomatic at the baseline; 12.8% subjects became symptomatic at the follow-up (FU) when 39.8% of the subjects had some persisting symptoms. At the baseline, 6.1% showed anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM positive, 59.3% only for IgG, and 34.5% for both. At the FU, these figures declined to 0.6, 54.0, and 4.4%, respectively, with the mean IgM and IgG levels declining about 6.3 and 2.5 folds. Blood group A was consistently linked to both sustaining and flipping of the gastrointestinal (GI) and respiratory symptoms. The baseline IgM level was associated with GI symptoms and pre-existing cirrhosis in multivariate models. Both of the baseline and FU IgG levels were strongly associated with age, male, and lung involvement seen in chest computed tomography (CT)-scan. Finally, as compared with antibody decayers, IgM sustainers were found to be more anosmic [mean difference (MD): 11.5%; P = 0.047] with lower body mass index (BMI) (MD: 1.30 kg/m2; P = 0.002), while IgG sustainers were more commonly females (MD: 19.2%; P = 0.042) with shorter diarrhea duration in the FU (MD: 2.8 days; P = 0.027). Our findings indicate how the anti-SARS-CoV-2 serologic response and COVID-19 clinical presentations change in relation to each other and basic characteristics.

13.
Pulm Pharmacol Ther ; 70: 102069, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347798

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused significant mortality worldwide. The disease attacks the lung tissue and may lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome. An in vitro study showed that hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has a prophylactic effect against COVID-19 due to its anti-inflammatory effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the prophylactic effect of HCQ on individuals in close contact with patients with COVID-19. METHOD: In this quasi-trial study, we prescribed HCQ for 7 days to all people who had close contact with a patient with COVID-19. All contacts underwent a nasal swab in two steps, and those positive for COVID-19 were excluded from the study. After 14 days of follow-up, the clinical and laboratory manifestations of COVID-19 were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 113 participants completed the study. The HCQ group comprised 51 (45.13%) contacts, and 62 (54.86%) contacts were allocated to the control group. According to the results of clinical examination and real-time polymerase chain reaction test, 8 (12.90%) contacts in the control group were reported to have contracted COVID-19. In the HCQ group, 7 (13.72%) contacts were confirmed to have contracted COVID-19. There was no relationship between HCQ use and age, sex, underlying disorders, and laboratory data (all p > 0.05). In terms of HCQ side effects, five participants experienced gastrointestinal and cutaneous side effects that subsided on discontinuation of HCQ. CONCLUSION: The current study showed that HCQ had no prophylactic effect with regard to COVID-19 prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxychloroquine , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
14.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 99: 107916, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333526

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been a serious obstacle in front of public health. Interferon-beta 1a (IFN-ß 1a) has been used to treat patients with COVID-19. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of high-dose IFN-ß 1a compared to low dose IFN-ß 1a in severe COVID-19 cases. METHODS: In this randomized, controlled, and clinical trial, eligible patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections were randomly assigned to receive one of the two following therapeutic regimens: The intervention group was treated with high-dose IFN-ß 1a (Recigen) (Subcutaneous injections of 88 µg (24 million IU) on days 1, 3, 6) + lopinavir /ritonavir (Kaletra) (400 mg/100 mg twice a day for 10 days, orally) and the control group was treated with low-dose IFN-ß 1a (Recigen) (Subcutaneous injections of 44 µg (12 million IU) on days 1, 3, 6) + lopinavir /ritonavir (Kaletra) (400 mg/100 mg twice a day for 10 days, orally). RESULT: A total of 168 COVID- 19 confirmed patients underwent randomization; 83 were assigned to the intervention group and 85 were assigned to the control group. Median Time To Clinical Improvement (TTIC) for cases treated with low-dose IFN-ß1a was shorter than that for cases treated with high-dose IFN-ß1a (6 vs 10 days; P = 0.018). The mortality rates in intervention and control group were 41% and 36.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The use of high-dose IFN-ß 1a did not improve TTCI in hospitalized patients with moderate to severe COVID-19. Also, it did not have any significant effect on mortality reduction compared with treating with low-dose IFN-ß 1a. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial has been registered as ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04521400.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Interferon beta-1a/administration & dosage , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Interferon beta-1a/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Treatment Outcome
15.
Clin Toxicol (Phila) ; 59(7): 628-632, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317865

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Botulism is a rare but serious disease, which appears in different forms. In this study, we reviewed the clinical features, laboratory data, and outcomes of patients who referred to our tertiary center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All confirmed cases of botulism referred to an academic referral center and a teaching hospital during 2009-2019, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Fifty-three cases of clinical or laboratory-confirmed botulism were examined in this study. Nineteen patients were confirmed by laboratory data (serotype A (89.5%) and serotype E (10.5%)). In seven cases, the cause of botulism was unclear. In two patients, systemic symptoms emerged after the therapeutic injection of botulinum neurotoxin. The majority of cases (83%) were caused by an obvious food source. In 66% of cases, the initial symptoms emerged within less than 36 h, while in 20.8% of cases, the symptoms developed within or after 36 h; however, in seven patients that their botulism sources were unclear, the onset could not be estimated. All patients showed cranial involvement and generalized manifestation, and 49.1% had gastrointestinal symptoms. Except for two patients who were not treated due to immediate drug reactions who manifested severe hemodynamic instability, the rest of the patients were treated with trivalent antitoxin (A, B, and E). The complete resolution of the symptoms during hospitalization was documented in 50.9% of the patients. About 17% of the patients were intubated. Two patients died due to massive bilateral pulmonary thromboembolism and cardiac asystole following respiratory failure. CONCLUSIONS: Although the complete resolution of the symptoms usually takes several weeks, in our experience, most patients showed at least partial resolution upon discharge. Early treatment results in better outcomes.


Subject(s)
Botulism/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Botulism/etiology , Botulism/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
16.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 99: 107969, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307010

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The effectiveness of umifenovir against COVID-19 is controversial; therefore, clinical trials are crucial to evaluate its efficacy. METHODS: The study was conducted as a single-center, randomized, open-label clinical trial. Eligible moderate-severe hospitalized patients with confirmed SARS-Cov-2 infection were randomly segregated into intervention and control groups. The intervention group were treated with lopinavir/ritonavir (400 mg/100 mg bid for 10-14 days) + hydroxychloroquine (400 mg single dose) + interferon-ß1a (Subcutaneous injections of 44 µg (12,000 IU) on days 1, 3, 5) + umifenovir (200 mg trice daily for 10 days), and the control group received lopinavir/ritonavir (same dose) + hydroxychloroquine (same dose) + interferon-ß1a (same dose). RESULTS: Of 1180 patients with positive RT-PCRs and positive chest CT scans, 101 patients were finally included in the trial; 50 were assigned to receive IFNß1a + hydroxychloroquine + lopinavir/ritonavir group and 51 were managed to treat with IFNß1a + hydroxychloroquine + lopinavir/ritonavir + umifenovir. Since all patients received the intended treatment as scheduled, the analysis just included as the ITT population. Time to clinical improvement (TTCI) did not hold a statistically significant difference between intervention and control groups (median, 9 days for intervention group versus 7 days for the control group; P: 0.22). Besides, Hazard Ratio for TTCI in the Cox regression model was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.45-1.23, P:0.25) which also confirmed that there was no statistically significant difference between the treatment group and the control group. The mortality was not statistically significant between the two groups (38% in controls vs 33.3% treatment group). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings shed new lights on the facts that additional umifenovir has not been found to be effective in shortening the duration of SARS-CoV-2 in severe patients and improving the prognosis in non-ICU patients and mortality. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was confirmed by the Ethics in Medical Research Committee of the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. signed informed consents were obtained from all the participants or their legally authorized representatives. This trial has been registered as ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04350684.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indoles/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine , Interferon beta-1a/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Ritonavir/therapeutic use
17.
European Journal of Inflammation (Sage Publications, Ltd.) ; : 1-3, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1231231

ABSTRACT

One of the most serious complications of COVID-19 is the development of uncontrolled production of cytokines that poses a major factor contributing to COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. The exact effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on clinical and biochemical course of in patients with underlying immune compromised conditions is not well known with recent available data. The present letter aimed to draw attention to COVID-19 in immune deficiency. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of European Journal of Inflammation (Sage Publications, Ltd.) is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

18.
Curr HIV Res ; 19(4): 377-382, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204159

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) announced the SARS-COV-2 disease pandemic on March 9, 2020. With the advent of this disease, another health burden was added to about 37.9 million people in the world who are infected with HIV and are suffering from various diseases. These people may be at serious risk of COVID-19. Information about the effects of COVID-19 on people living with HIV, is limited. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a 61-year-old man who was a known case of HIV from 6 years ago that was being treated with HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy). He also had a history of Hodgkin's lymphoma from 4 years ago who underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) 2 weeks before given referral to our hospital. He complained of weakness, anorexia, and fever. RT-PCR for SARS-COV-2-RNA was positive in his nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swab. He was diagnosed with COVID-19 infection and treated with atazanavir. After one week, the patient discharged in a good general state. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report of COVID-19 infection in an HIV positive patient after BMT in Iran. Despite his immunodeficiency, COVID-19 disease had mild manifestations and he had a good prognosis. We hope that our report and that of others can remain promising to doctors and HIV patients cross fingers for COVID-19 recovery.


Subject(s)
Atazanavir Sulfate/therapeutic use , Bone Marrow Transplantation , COVID-19/drug therapy , Comorbidity , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hodgkin Disease/surgery , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
19.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 68: 90-96, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987743

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore anxiety status across a broad range of HCWs supporting patients with COVID-19 in different global regions. METHOD: This was an international online survey in which participation was on voluntary basis and data were submitted via Google Drive, across a two-week period starting from March 18, 2020. The Beck Anxiety Inventory was used to quantify the level of anxiety. RESULTS: 1416 HCWs (70.8% medical doctors, 26.2% nurses) responded to the survey from 75 countries. The distribution of anxiety levels was: normal/minimal (n = 503, 35.5%), low (n = 390, 27.5%); moderate (n = 287, 20.3%), and severe (n = 236, 16.7%). According to multiple generalized linear model, female gender (p = 0.001), occupation (ie, being a nurse dealing directly with patients with COVID-19 [p = 0.017]), being younger (p = 0.001), reporting inadequate knowledge on COVID-19 (p = 0.005), having insufficient personal protective equipment (p = 0.001) and poor access to hand sanitizers or liquid soaps (p = 0.008), coexisting chronic disorders (p = 0.001) and existing mental health problems (p = 0.001), and higher income of countries where HCWs lived (p = 0.048) were significantly associated with increased anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: Front-line HCWs, regardless of the levels of COVID-19 transmission in their country, are anxious when they do not feel protected. Our findings suggest that anxiety could be mitigated ensuring sufficient levels of protective personal equipment alongside greater education and information.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors
20.
Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 15(3), 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-918442
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL