Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323298

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak introduced self-isolation and social distancing as measures to reduce the spreading of the pandemic. As a consequence, internet usage has increased globally. The current study aims to show whether internet worked as a resource for well-being or as an amplifier of psychological distress and problematic internet use (PIU), considering the role of gender, age, motives for using the internet and online/offline relational resources. Five hundred and seventy-three adult participants (M: 40.28;SD: 16.43;64% women) completed a form on sociodemographic characteristics and Internet use, and completed standardized measures on loneliness, online social support, well-being and PIU. A principal component analysis was computed to identify the main motives Internet use;ANOVA and Pearson’s r correlations were computed to examine (dis)similarities in motivational components with respect to gender, agegroup and psychosocial measures. A multivariate multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the contribution of the hypothesized predictors on overall well-being and PIU.Three principal motives for Internet use were detected: leisure and social interaction, knowledge, learning/working. Significant differences were found among them with respect to gender and age group and online/offline relational resources. Differences were found in the likelihood of PIU and well-being related to all the variables considered, with the exception of online social support for PIU and gender and age for well-being. These findings call for further research aimed to disentangle the correlates of PIU in a time of physical distancing, as well as for innovative efforts tailored to blunt the impacts of social isolation and bolster social connectivity.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307682

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to test an explanatory model for individual and social wellbeing which incorporates the advantages of using digital technologies during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was carried out in Italy, one of the countries that has been most severely affected by the pandemic worldwide. The study was designed to include variables that might be specifically pertinent to the uniqueness of the restrictions imposed by the pandemic. Adults living in Italy (n=1412) completed an online survey during the lockdown period in March 2020. Results showed two distinct digital interaction processes highlighted by the facilitating use of online emotions (“e-motions”) and online social support (“e-support”). In short, e-motions were positively related to posttraumatic growth, which in turn was positively associated with positive mental health and higher engagement in prosocial behaviors. Moreover, individuals who perceived themselves as having greater e-support were characterized by higher levels of positive mental health, which it turn was positively associated with prosocial behaviors. Collectively, these two digital interaction processes suggest that digital technologies appear to be critical resources in helping individuals cope with difficulties raised by the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
J Clin Med ; 10(24)2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572524

ABSTRACT

Patients with end-stage kidney disease represent a frail population and might be at higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The Lazio Regional Dialysis and Transplant Registry collected information on dialysis patients with a positive swab. The study investigated incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, mortality and their potential associated factors in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) in the Lazio region. Method: The occurrence of infection was assessed among MHD patients included in the RRDTL from 1 March to 30 November 2020. The adjusted cumulative incidence of infection and mortality risk within 30 days of infection onset were estimated. Logistic and Cox regression models were applied to identify factors associated with infection and mortality, respectively. Results: The MHD cohort counted 4942 patients; 256 (5.2%) had COVID-19. The adjusted cumulative incidence was 5.1%. Factors associated with infection included: being born abroad, educational level, cystic renal disease/familial nephropathy, vascular disease and being treated in a dialysis center located in Local Health Authority (LHA) Rome 2. Among infected patients, 59 (23.0%) died within 30 days; the adjusted mortality risk was 21.0%. Factors associated with 30-day mortality included: age, malnutrition and fever at the time of swab. Conclusions: Factors associated with infection seem to reflect socioeconomic conditions. Factors associated with mortality, in addition to age, are related to clinical characteristics and symptoms at the time of swab.

5.
Montalto, Francesca, Ippolito, Mariachiara, Noto, Alberto, Madotto, Fabiana, Gelardi, Filippa, Savatteri, Paolino, Giarratano, Antonino, Cortegiani, Andrea, Brescia, Fabrizio, Fabiani, Fabio, Zanier, Chiara, Nadalini, Elisa, Gambaretti, Eros, Gabriele, Francesco, Astuto, Marinella, Murabito, Paolo, Sanfilippo, Filippo, Misseri, Giovanni, Moscarelli, Alessandra, Spadaro, Savino, Bussolati, Enrico, Squadrani, Eleonora, Villa, Gianluca, D’Errico, Raffaella, Cocci, Giulia, Lanini, Iacopo, Mirabella, Lucia, Morelli, Alessandra, Tullo, Livio, Caggianelli, Girolamo, Ball, Lorenzo, Iiriti, Margherita, Giordani, Francesca, Giardina, Massimiliano, Mazzeo, Anna Teresa, Grasselli, Giacomo, Cattaneo, Emanuele, Alongi, Salvatore, Marenghi, Cristina, Marmiere, Marilena, Rocchi, Margherita, Turi, Stefano, Landoni, Giovanni, Torrano, Vito, Tinti, Giulia, Giorgi, Antonio, Fumagalli, Roberto, Salvo, Francesco, Blangetti, Ilaria, Cascella, Marco, Forte, Cira Antonietta, Navalesi, Paolo, Montalbano, Marta, Chiarelli, Valentina, Bonanno, Giuseppe, Ferrara, Francesco Paolo, Pernice, Innocenza, Catalisano, Giulia, Marino, Claudia, Presti, Gabriele, Fricano, Dario Calogero, Fucà, Rosa, Palmeri di Villalba, Cesira, Strano, Maria Teresa, Caruso, Sabrina, Scafidi, Antonino, Mazzarese, Vincenzo, Augugliaro, Ettore, Terranova, Valeria, Forfori, Francesco, Corradi, Francesco, Taddei, Erika, Isirdi, Alessandro, Pratesi, Giorgia, Puccini, Francesca, Paternoster, Gianluca, Barile, Alessio, Tescione, Marco, Santacaterina, Irene, Siclari, Eliana Maria, Tripodi, Vincenzo Francesco, Vadalà, Mariacristina, Agrò, Felice Eugenio, Pascarella, Giuseppe, Piliego, Chiara, Aceto, Paola, De Pascale, Gennaro, Dottarelli, Alessandra, Romanò, Bruno, Russo, Andrea, Covotta, Marco, Giorgerini, Valeria, Sardellitti, Federica, Vitelli, Giulia Maria, Coluzzi, Flaminia, Bove, Tiziana, Vetrugno, Luigi.
Journal of Anesthesia, Analgesia and Critical Care ; 1(1):17-17, 2021.
Article in English | BioMed Central | ID: covidwho-1542137
7.
J Multidiscip Healthc ; 14: 2719-2730, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456172

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Palliative care is a person-centered approach aiming to relieve patient's health-related suffering and it is often needed when caring for critically ill patients to manage symptoms and identify goals of care. AIM: To describe the integration of palliative care principles in anesthesiology clinical practice, within and outside the ICU and to analyze the additional challenges that COVID-19 pandemic is posing in this context. METHODS: For the purpose of this review, PubMed database was searched for studies concerning palliative care and end of life care, in contexts involving anesthesiologists and intensivists, published in the last 5 years. RESULTS: Anesthesiologists and intensivists integrate palliative care within their daily practice providing symptoms management as well as family counseling. High-quality communicational skills are fundamental for anesthesiologists and intensivists especially when interfacing with surrogate decision makers in the ICU or with patients in the preoperative setting while discussing goals of care. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has challenged many aspects of palliative care delivery: reduced family presence within the ICU, communication with families through phone calls or video calls, patient-physician relationship mediated by bulky personal protective equipment and healthcare workers physical and psychological distress due to the increased workload and limitations in resources are some of the most evident. CONCLUSION: Anesthesiologists and intensivists are increasingly facing challenging clinical situations where principles and practice of palliative care have to be applied. In this sense, increasing knowledge on palliative care and providing specific training would allow to deliver high-quality symptom management, family counseling and end of life guidance in critical care settings. COVID-19 pandemic sets additional difficulties to palliative care delivery.

8.
Microorganisms ; 9(10)2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the occurrence of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and the related clinical consequences. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the pooled occurrence of BSIs among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and mortality of this patient population. METHODS: A systematic search was performed on PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science from inception to 19 April 2021. The primary outcome was the occurrence of BSIs among hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The secondary outcome was mortality at the longest available follow-up. RESULTS: Forty-six studies met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 42,694 patients evaluated. The estimated occurrence of BSIs was 7.3% (95% CI 4.7-1.1%) among hospitalized patients with COVID-19, with a mortality rate of 41% (95% CI 30%-52.8%). The subgroup analysis conducted on patients admitted to ICU provided an estimated occurrence of 29.6% (95% CI 21.7%-38.8%). A higher occurrence of BSI was observed in patients with COVID-19, in comparison with patients without COVID-19 (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.53-5.02; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis estimated the occurrence of BSIs among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 at around 7%. A four-times higher occurrence was estimated among patients admitted to ICU.

9.
Psychol Health ; : 1-18, 2021 Jul 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316772

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the direct and indirect associations between intolerance of uncertainty, health anxiety (HA), and psychological distress through problematic internet use (PIU) and cyberchondria, both before and during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Two Italian samples were enrolled via an online questionnaire. Sample 1 (N = 556; 69.3% females, Mage 29.6 years, SD = 13.2) was recruited in non-pandemic times, whereas Sample 2 (N = 575; 74% females, Mage 31.9 years, SD = 13.4) was recruited during the COVID-19 lockdown. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-report measures assessing HA and psychological distress. RESULTS: Two distinct path analyses showed that intolerance of uncertainty was directly associated with HA and psychological distress in both samples. Moreover, cyberchondria partially mediated the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and HA and PIU partially mediated the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and psychological distress in both samples. The link between cyberchondria and psychological distress was significant in Sample 2 but non-significant in Sample 1. The model accounted for a substantial variance of HA and psychological distress in both samples. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that problematic online behaviors might exacerbate the negative consequences of intolerance of uncertainty in terms of higher levels of HA and psychological distress both in pandemic and non-pandemic contexts.

10.
Am J Pathol ; 191(7): 1193-1208, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283899

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can arise from unknown causes, as in idiopathic PF, or as a consequence of infections, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Current treatments for PF slow, but do not stop, disease progression. We report that treatment with a runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) inhibitor (Ro24-7429), previously found to be safe, although ineffective, as a Tat inhibitor in patients with HIV, robustly ameliorates lung fibrosis and inflammation in the bleomycin-induced PF mouse model. RUNX1 inhibition blunted fundamental mechanisms downstream pathologic mediators of fibrosis and inflammation, including transforming growth factor-ß1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in cultured lung epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells, indicating pleiotropic effects. RUNX1 inhibition also reduced the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and FES Upstream Region (FURIN), host proteins critical for SARS-CoV-2 infection, in mice and in vitro. A subset of human lungs with SARS-CoV-2 infection overexpress RUNX1. These data suggest that RUNX1 inhibition via repurposing of Ro24-7429 may be beneficial for PF and to battle SARS-CoV-2, by reducing expression of viral mediators and by preventing respiratory complications.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit/antagonists & inhibitors , Furin/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Animals , Bleomycin , Cells, Cultured , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Female , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Happiness Stud ; 23(2): 727-745, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274883

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to test an explanatory model for individual and social wellbeing which incorporates the advantages of using digital technologies during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was carried out in Italy, one of the countries that has been most severely affected by the pandemic worldwide. The study was designed to include variables that might be specifically pertinent to the uniqueness of the restrictions imposed by the pandemic. Adults living in Italy (n = 1412) completed an online survey during the lockdown period in March 2020. Results showed two distinct digital interaction processes highlighted by the facilitating use of online emotions ("e-motions") and online social support ("e-support"). In short, e-motions were positively related to posttraumatic growth, which in turn was positively associated with positive mental health and higher engagement in prosocial behaviors. Moreover, individuals who perceived themselves as having greater e-support were characterized by higher levels of positive mental health, which it turn was positively associated with prosocial behaviors. Collectively, these two digital interaction processes suggest that digital technologies appear to be critical resources in helping individuals cope with difficulties raised by the COVID-19 pandemic.

12.
Am J Pathol ; 191(7): 1193-1208, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242859

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can arise from unknown causes, as in idiopathic PF, or as a consequence of infections, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Current treatments for PF slow, but do not stop, disease progression. We report that treatment with a runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) inhibitor (Ro24-7429), previously found to be safe, although ineffective, as a Tat inhibitor in patients with HIV, robustly ameliorates lung fibrosis and inflammation in the bleomycin-induced PF mouse model. RUNX1 inhibition blunted fundamental mechanisms downstream pathologic mediators of fibrosis and inflammation, including transforming growth factor-ß1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in cultured lung epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells, indicating pleiotropic effects. RUNX1 inhibition also reduced the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and FES Upstream Region (FURIN), host proteins critical for SARS-CoV-2 infection, in mice and in vitro. A subset of human lungs with SARS-CoV-2 infection overexpress RUNX1. These data suggest that RUNX1 inhibition via repurposing of Ro24-7429 may be beneficial for PF and to battle SARS-CoV-2, by reducing expression of viral mediators and by preventing respiratory complications.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit/antagonists & inhibitors , Furin/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Animals , Bleomycin , Cells, Cultured , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Female , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Treatment Outcome
13.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 10(5)2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223914

ABSTRACT

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the pooled occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) among patients admitted to an intensive care unit with COVID-19 and mortality of those who developed VAP. We performed a systematic search on PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science from inception to 2nd March 2021 for nonrandomized studies specifically addressing VAP in adult patients with COVID-19 and reporting data on at least one primary outcome of interest. Random effect single-arm meta-analysis was performed for the occurrence of VAP and mortality (at the longest follow up) and ICU length of stay. Twenty studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, for a total of 2611 patients with at least one episode of VAP. The pooled estimated occurrence of VAP was of 45.4% (95% C.I. 37.8-53.2%; 2611/5593 patients; I2 = 96%). The pooled estimated occurrence of mortality was 42.7% (95% C.I. 34-51.7%; 371/946 patients; I2 = 82%). The estimated summary estimated metric mean ICU LOS was 28.58 days (95% C.I. 21.4-35.8; I2 = 98%). Sensitivity analysis showed that patients with COVID-19 may have a higher risk of developing VAP than patients without COVID-19 (OR 3.24; 95% C.I. 2.2-4.7; P = 0.015; I2 = 67.7%; five studies with a comparison group).

14.
Resuscitation ; 164: 122-129, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219386

ABSTRACT

AIM: To estimate the mortality rate, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival with favorable neurological outcome in patients with COVID-19 after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, bioRxiv and medRxiv were surveyed up to 8th February 2021 for studies reporting data on mortality of patients with COVID-19 after IHCA. The primary outcome sought was mortality (in-hospital or at 30 days) after IHCA with attempted CPR. Additional outcomes were the overall rate of IHCA, the rate of non-shockable presenting rhythms, the rate of ROSC and the rate of survival with favorable neurological status. RESULTS: Ten articles were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, for a total of 1179 COVID-19 patients after IHCA with attempted CPR. The estimated overall mortality rate (in-hospital or at 30 days) was 89.9% (95% Predicted Interval [P.I.] 83.1%-94.2%; 1060/1179 patients; I2 = 82%). The estimated rate of non-shockable presenting rhythms was 89% (95% P.I. 82.8%-93.1%; 1022/1205 patients; I2 = 85%), and the estimated rate of ROSC was 32.9% (95% P.I. 26%-40.6%; 365/1205 patients; I2 = 82%). The estimated overall rate of survival with favorable neurological status at 30 days was 6.3% (95% P.I. 4%-9.7%; 50/851 patients; I2 = 48%). Sensitivity analysis showed that COVID-19 patients had higher risk of death after IHCA than non COVID-19 patients (OR 2.34; 95% C.I. 1.37-3.99; number of studies = 3; 1215 patients). CONCLUSIONS: Although one of three COVID-19 patients undergoing IHCA may achieve ROSC, almost 90% may not survive at 30 days or to hospital discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Heart Arrest , Heart Arrest/therapy , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Affect Disord ; 279: 578-584, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912317

ABSTRACT

In the current study we sought to extend our understanding of vulnerability and protective factors (the Big Five personality traits, health anxiety, and COVID-19 psychological distress) in predicting generalised anxiety and depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (n = 502), who were United States residents, completed a variety of sociodemographic questions and the following questionnaires: Big Five Inventory-10 (BFI-10), Whitley Index 7 (WI-7), Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS), COVID-19 Anxiety Syndrome Scale (C19-ASS), and Patient Health Questionnaire Anxiety and Depression Scale (PHQ-ADS). Results showed that extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness were negatively correlated with generalised anxiety and depressive symptoms and that neuroticism, health anxiety and both measures of COVID-19 psychological distress were positively correlated with generalised anxiety and depressive symptoms. We used path analysis to determine the pattern of relationships specified by the theoretical model we proposed. Results showed that health anxiety, COVID-19 anxiety, and the COVID-19 anxiety syndrome partially mediated the relationship between the Big Five personality traits and generalised anxiety and depressive symptoms. Specifically, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were negatively associated with the three mediators, which, in turn, were positively associated with generalised anxiety and depressive symptoms, with COVID-19 anxiety showing the strongest effect. Conversely, neuroticism and openness were positively associated with COVID-19 anxiety and the COVID-19 anxiety syndrome, respectively. These relationships were independent of age, gender, employment status and risk status. The model accounted for a substantial variance of generalised anxiety and depression symptoms (R2 = .75). The implications of these findings are discussed.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Personality , Psychological Distress , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Depression/epidemiology , Extraversion, Psychological , Female , Humans , Male , Neuroticism , Pandemics , Personality Inventory , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL