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1.
Journal of Neuroimmunology ; : 578011, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165601

ABSTRACT

Post-infectious immune-mediated neurological complications of Sars-Cov-2 have been increasingly recognized since the novel pandemic emerged. We describe the case of a 74 years-old patient who developed a Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG) antibody-associated unilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis a few weeks after paucisymptomatic COVID-19 disease and, subsequently, after the resolution of the optic neuritis, an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. So far, no cases of these two neurological manifestations have been reported in the same patient. We herein report a case characterized by both manifestations and review the accumulating literature regarding MOG antibody-associated disease following SarsCov-2 infection.

2.
J Neuroimmunol ; 370: 577933, 2022 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983506

ABSTRACT

This case series describes 9 patients diagnosed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-IgG associated disorder (MOGAD) following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Patients developed neurological symptoms between 4 days and 5 weeks following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Myelitis was observed in 4 patients; 4 presented with optic neuritis; and encephalopathy was observed in 3. Serum MOG-IgG cell-based assay was medium or high positive in each case. The majority of patients had near-complete recovery following acute immunosuppression. This series adds to the growing number of cases of central nervous system demyelination following SARS-CoV-2 infection and highlights a potential role of infection in the immunopathogenesis of MOGAD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromyelitis Optica , Autoantibodies , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Commun Med (Lond) ; 1: 38, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860417

ABSTRACT

Background: The antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines in individuals with waning immunity generated by a previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as the patterns of IgA and IgM responses in previously infected and in naïve individuals are still poorly understood. Methods: We performed a serology study in a cohort of BTN162b2 mRNA vaccine recipients who were immunologically naïve (N, n = 50) or had been previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 (P.I., n = 51) during the first (n = 25) or second (n = 26) pandemic waves in Italy, respectively. We measured IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) and IgG against the nucleocapsid (N) proteins, as well as the neutralizing activity of sera collected before vaccination, after the first and second dose of vaccine. Results: Most P.I. individuals from the first pandemic wave who showed declining antibody titres responded to the first vaccine dose with IgG-S and pseudovirus neutralization titres that were significantly higher than those observed in N individuals after the second vaccine dose. In all recipients, a single dose of vaccine was sufficient to induce a potent IgA response that was not associated with serum neutralization titres. We observed an unconventional pattern of IgM responses that were elicited in only half of immunologically naïve subjects even after the second vaccine dose. Conclusions: The response to a single dose of vaccine in P.I. individuals is more potent than that observed in N individuals after two doses. Vaccine-induced IgA are not associated with serum neutralization.

5.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(6): 1855-1858, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832044

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Abs) distinguish a group of inflammatory disorders which can be preceded by specific or non-specific infections. A few single cases have been reported in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection, but a specific study on the correlation between COVID-19 and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-associated disorder (MOGAD) has not yet been performed. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the pandemic on this condition. METHODS: We analysed SARS-CoV-2 serology in patients newly diagnosed with MOGAD (1 August 2020 to 31 May 2021). MOG-Ab-seronegative age- and time-matched subjects were used as controls. SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels were analysed using an anti-SARS-CoV-2 US Food and Drug Administration-approved ELISA assay and confirmed with a trimeric anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG immunochemiluminescent test, concomitantly assaying the anti-receptor binding domain (RBD) of spike protein IgG and anti-RBD total Ig. We actually compared the number of cases referred in each of the last 3 years. RESULTS: Presence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies was more common (12/30, 40%) in MOGAD patients than in controls (6/30, 20%), although the difference was not significant (p = 0.16; odds ratio 2.67, 95% confidence interval 0.85-9.17). The most common clinical presentations of MOGAD SARS-CoV-2-seropositive patients included optic neuritis (n = 6) and myelitis (n = 3). The number of diagnosed cases increased over the last 3 years, in particular, when including cases referred to us before the COVID-19 pandemic, in the initial phase of the first wave and in the late phase of the second wave (n = 9, rate 10.6% in 2019; n = 13, rate 12.3% in 2020; n = 15, rate 14.7% in 2021). CONCLUSION: Our findings provide preliminary data on SARS-CoV-2 as a potential trigger of MOGAD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Autoantibodies , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 63: 103827, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1804910

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this retrospective multicenter study, we evaluated the safety of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients harboring autoantibodies targeting neuronal surface and/or synaptic antigens. METHODS: From eight Italian Neurology Units, we included patients with: a) serum and/or CSF positivity for specific neuronal autoantibodies; b) a compatible neurological syndrome; and c) available follow-up ≥6 weeks after vaccination with any of the approved SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Demographics, clinical data, and information regarding previous SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination were collected. Disease relapses were considered "post-infectious" or "post-vaccination" when occurring within 6 weeks from infection/vaccination. RESULTS: We included 66 patients; 7/66 (11%) had a previous history of SARS-CoV-2 infection and 1/7 (14%) had post-infection relapses. BNT162b2-Pfizer-BioNTec was administered in 55 cases (83.3%) and mRNA-1273-Moderna in 11 (16.7%). The median number of doses administered per patient was 2 (1-3) and >50% of patients did not experience side effects. Five patients (8%) had post-vaccination relapses (seizure 3/5); 4/5 improved after immunotherapy, while one did not receive immunotherapy and worsened. Patients with post-vaccination relapses had higher disability scores at vaccination (p = 0.025), a trend favoring Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 LGI1 glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) antibodies (p =  0.054) and shorter time from last relapse (p = 0.057). DISCUSSION: Our data support the safety of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with neurological disorders associated with antibodies to neuronal and synaptic antigens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Antibodies, Viral , Autoantibodies , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
7.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 58: 103424, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525909

ABSTRACT

Post-vaccination disease relapses have been reported in patients with MOGAD and AQP4-IgG+NMOSD. In this retrospective multicenter Italian study we assessed the frequency of relapses after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. We included 56 cases: MOGAD, 30; AQP4-IgG+NMOSD, 26. Vaccines received were BNT162b2-Pfizer-BioNTech in 42 patients and mRNA-1273-Moderna in 14 patients. Six patients had a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection; two of them experienced a post-infection disease relapse (MOGAD). The frequency of relapses within one month of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination was 4% (1/26) in the AQP4-IgG+NMOSD group and 0% in the MOGAD group. In these patients the potential benefits of vaccination overcome the risk of relapses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromyelitis Optica , Aquaporin 4 , Autoantibodies , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
8.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(9): e3019-e3026, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501050

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent findings indicated that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-related neurological manifestations involve cytokine release syndrome along with endothelial activation, blood brain barrier dysfunction, and immune-mediated mechanisms. Very few studies have fully investigated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) correlates of SARS-CoV-2 encephalitis. METHODS: Patients with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and encephalitis (COV-Enc), encephalitis without SARS-CoV-2 infection (ENC), and healthy controls (HC) underwent an extended panel of CSF neuronal (neurofilament light chain [NfL], T-tau), glial (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 [sTREM2], chitinase-3-like protein 1 [YKL-40]) and inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin [IL]-1ß, IL-6, Il-8, tumor necrosis factor [TNF] α, CXCL-13, and ß2-microglobulin). RESULTS: Thirteen COV-Enc, 21 ENC, and 18 HC entered the study. In COV-Enc cases, CSF was negative for SARS-CoV-2 real-time PCR but exhibited increased IL-8 levels independently from presence of pleocytosis/hyperproteinorracchia. COV-Enc patients showed increased IL-6, TNF- α, and ß2-microglobulin and glial markers (GFAP, sTREM2, YKL-40) levels similar to ENC but normal CXCL13 levels. Neuronal markers NfL and T-tau were abnormal only in severe cases. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2-related encephalitis were associated with prominent glial activation and neuroinflammatory markers, whereas neuronal markers were increased in severe cases only. The pattern of CSF alterations suggested a cytokine-release syndrome as the main inflammatory mechanism of SARS-CoV-2-related encephalitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Encephalitis , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Immunol Res ; 69(6): 553-557, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345196

ABSTRACT

The persistence of neurological symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as the presence of late axonal damage, is still unknown. We performed extensive systemic and neurological follow-up evaluations in 107 out of 193 consecutive patients admitted to the COVID-19 medical unit, University Hospital of Verona, Italy between March and June 2020. We analysed serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels in all cases including a subgroup (n = 29) of patients with available onset samples. Comparisons between clinical and biomarker data were then performed. Neurological symptoms were still present in a significant number (n = 49) of patients over the follow-up. The most common reported symptoms were hyposmia (n = 11), fatigue (n = 28), myalgia (n = 14), and impaired memory (n = 11) and were more common in cases with severe acute COVID-19. Follow-up serum NfL values (15.2 pg/mL, range 2.4-62.4) were within normal range in all except 5 patients and did not differentiate patients with vs without persistent neurological symptoms. In patients with available onset and follow-up samples, a significant (p < 0.001) decrease of NfL levels was observed and was more evident in patients with a severe acute disease. Despite the common persistence of neurological symptoms, COVID-19 survivors do not show active axonal damage, which seems a peculiar feature of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Axons/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/pathology , Ageusia/virology , Anosmia/pathology , Anosmia/virology , Axons/virology , Disease Progression , Fatigue/pathology , Fatigue/virology , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Memory Disorders/pathology , Memory Disorders/virology , Middle Aged , Myalgia/pathology , Myalgia/virology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Neurofilament Proteins/blood , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Neurovirol ; 27(4): 631-637, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338291

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 survivors may report persistent symptoms that resemble myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We explored (a) ME/CFS-like symptom prevalence and (b) whether axonal, inflammatory, and/or lung changes may contribute to ME/CFS-like symptoms in SARS-CoV-2 survivors through clinical, neuropsychiatric, neuropsychological, lung function assessment, and serum neurofilament light chain, an axonal damage biomarker. ME/CFS-like features were found in 27% of our sample. ME/CFS-like group showed worse sleep quality, fatigue, pain, depressive symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, Borg baseline dyspnea of the 6-min walking test vs. those without ME/CFS-like symptoms. These preliminary findings raise concern on a possible future ME/CFS-like pandemic in SARS-CoV-2 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Infect Dis ; 223(1): 28-37, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several preclinical and clinical investigations have argued for nervous system involvement in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Some sparse case reports have described various forms of encephalitis in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease, but very few data have focused on clinical presentations, clinical course, response to treatment, and outcomes. METHODS: The SARS-CoV-2 related encephalopaties (ENCOVID) multicenter study included patients with encephalitis with full infectious screening, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection recruited from 13 centers in northern Italy. Clinical presentation and laboratory markers, severity of COVID-19 disease, response to treatment, and outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-five cases of encephalitis positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were included. CSF showed hyperproteinorrachia and/or pleocytosis in 68% of cases whereas SARS-CoV-2 RNA by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction resulted negative. Based on MRI, cases were classified as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM; n = 3), limbic encephalitis (LE; n = 2), encephalitis with normal imaging (n = 13), and encephalitis with MRI alterations (n = 7). ADEM and LE cases showed a delayed onset compared to the other encephalitis cases (P = .001) and were associated with previous, more severe COVID-19 respiratory involvement. Patients with MRI alterations exhibited worse response to treatment and final outcomes compared to those with other encephalitis. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with a wide spectrum of encephalitis characterized by different clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Encephalitis/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Electroencephalography , Encephalitis/classification , Encephalitis/virology , Female , Humans , Italy , Longitudinal Studies , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged
12.
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry ; 92(2): 218-220, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873577
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