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1.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 18(4): e586-e599, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604662

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Graduate medical and research training has drastically changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, with widespread implementation of virtual learning, redeployment from core rotations to the care of patients with COVID-19, and significant emotional and physical stressors. The specific experience of hematology-oncology (HO) fellows during the COVID-19 pandemic is not known. METHODS: We conducted a mixed-methods study using a survey of Likert-style and open-ended questions to assess the training experience and well-being of HO fellows, including both clinical and postdoctoral trainee members of the American Society of Hematology and ASCO. RESULTS: A total of 2,306 surveys were distributed by e-mail; 548 (23.8%) fellows completed the survey. Nearly 40% of fellows felt that they had not received adequate mental health support during the pandemic, and 22% reported new symptoms of burnout. Pre-existing burnout before the pandemic, COVID-19-related clinical work, and working in a primary research or nonclinical setting were associated with increased burnout on multivariable logistic regression. Qualitative thematic analysis of open-ended responses revealed significant concerns about employment after training completion, perceived variable quality of virtual education and board preparation, loss of clinical opportunities to prepare for independent clinical practice, inadequate grant funding opportunities in part because of shifting research priorities, variable productivity, and mental health or stress during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: HO fellows have been profoundly affected by the pandemic, and our data illustrate multiple avenues for fellowship programs and national organizations to support both clinical and postdoctoral trainees.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Hematology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Hematology/education , Humans , Medical Oncology/education , Pandemics
2.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):20-21, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1339111

ABSTRACT

Introduction:While the COVID-19 pandemic has affected many aspects of clinical care, research, and medical training, its impact on hematology-oncology trainees and professional development has not been described. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) sought to assess the impact of COVID-19 on fellows enrolled in hematology-oncology programs.Methods:In spring 2020, ASH and ASCO developed and administered a survey by e-mail to active hematology-oncology fellow members. Response formats used both a semi-Likert scale and open-ended text. Questions focused on fellow experiences and how changes in their programs have impacted their personal and professional lives across several domains. Multiple-choice responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and NVivo software was used for qualitative analysis of open-ended questions.Results:Respondent demographics are described in Table 1. Of 2,306 trainees, 620 (27%) responded to the survey. Most respondents continued patient care responsibilities during the pandemic (80%). Almost half of all trainees (47%) reported that they felt less productive than usual. Stress and/or anxiety about the current situation was the most cited factor affecting productivity in the overall cohort (Figure 1). One-third (33%) of respondents had volunteered or were assigned to clinical/non-clinical COVID-19-related efforts. Of the 90 visa holders in our cohort, 30% (N=27) reported experiencing issues with their visa/immigration status.Eight percent of respondents stated their career plans had changed due to COVID-19. Of those who said their plans had changed, 30 respondents were considering careers in academia pre-pandemic and 11 were considering private practice. However, only 14 respondents were considering academia post-pandemic while 19 were interested in private practice. Overall, most respondents had concerns about at least one of the following: salary reductions, availability of networking events, family well-being, mental health and obtaining a job (Figure 2).The prevalence of burnout increased from 22% (N=105) before the pandemic to 33% (N=161) during (p<.001). Of the respondents who did not report burnout before COVID-19, 22% noted new-onset burnout during the pandemic. New-onset burnout prevalence varied based on the type of work respondents performed: no COVID-related work (17%), COVID-related non-clinical work (26%), and COVID-related clinical work (34%) (p<0.01).The open-ended responses yielded several consistent themes. Clinical and educational constraints were enumerated: lost learning opportunities due to low patient volumes, unavailability of colleagues to discuss cases, and overall low perceived quality of virtual learning. Trainees also reported reduced motivation to complete work within a stipulated time frame due to lack of robust discussions in the virtual environment and technological challenges in navigating educational resources. Trainee research was also severely impacted as laboratories closed, experimental animal colonies were lost, and many research activities ceased. Respondents also expressed concern that cuts in research training initiatives and budgets would jeopardize faculty positions for graduating fellows and that funding for travel and conferences was suspended.Fellows' recommendations for ASH and ASCO included improved online education, virtual research training and networking opportunities, practical guidance on caring for immune-compromised patients during the pandemic, increased funding resources for trainees, mental health resources, and advocating on behalf of trainee visa holders.Conclusions:Hematology-oncology trainees reported their training experiences have been deeply impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. A majority of trainees are concerned about the negative impact on career opportunities, research funding, financial well-being, and mental health. Burnout increased during COVID-19, especially in trainees who were assigned to specific COVID-related efforts. Training programs and profess onal societies can support trainees by increasing trainee research funding, online networking and learning opportunities, mental health resources and, support for international trainees.

3.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):27-28, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1338962

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In patients with SARS-CoV-2 COVID-19 infection elevated D-dimers are associated with a poor prognosis. Although suggestive of DIC, the majority of patients do not fulfil ISTH criteria for DIC. Studies have demonstrated that when compared to D-dimer, fibrin monomers are more sensitive and specific when differentiating overt DIC from non-overt DIC. Our special coagulation laboratory (SCL) routinely measures soluble fibrin monomer complex (SFMC) as part of our DIC profile in samples with elevated D-dimers. Here we aimed to investigate the percentage of patients with COVID-19 infection with elevated SFMC as performed as part of the DIC profile.Methods: Between April 1st 2020 and July 26, 2020 inpatients at the Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN campus with COVID-19 infection who underwent DIC testing in SCL were identified through SCL database. Patients were excluded if SARS-CoV2 PCR results were not available in the Mayo Clinic electronic medical record (EMR). DIC profile components include prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), fibrinogen and D-dimer. Reflex SFMC is performed if D-dimer is elevated. Data abstracted from EMR included results of laboratory tests, date of COVID-19 symptom onset, date of SARS-CoV2 PCR positivity, and death within 30 days of hospital admission. The ISTH DIC score was calculated and patients were labeled as overt DIC or non-overt DIC based off of ISTH DIC score ≥5.Results: 35 patients (19 female), median age 59 years (28-91) met our study criteria DIC profiles were obtained 6.5 (1-37) days after COVID-19 symptom onset (n=33) with 28 obtained within 14 days of symptom onset. Time to DIC profile from SARS-CoV2 PCR testing was 4 (0-37) days (n=35) with 31 having testing completed within 14 days of PCR positivity. 8 patients were intubated during hospitalization and of the remaining 27, 67% required supplemental oxygen.21/35 (60%) patients had an elevated fibrinogen (526.5 mg/dL (201-800)) while 19/35 (54%) had a prolonged PT (12.8 seconds (10.1-99.6) and 5/35 (14%) had a prolonged APTT (31 seconds (24-68)). 17 patients with prolonged PT and 3 patients with prolonged APTT had factor activity assays performed (Figure 1A). 9/35 (25%) had thrombocytopenia (230 x 109/L (12-709) and 27/35 (77%) patients had an elevated D-dimer (895 ng/ml FEU (220- >100,000). D-dimer was higher in males than in females (p: 0.049). Of those with elevated D-dimer only 5/27 (18.5%) had an elevated SFMC (5 mcg/ml (5- >1100) (Figure 1B).4/35 (11%) patients had ISTH DIC scores ≥ 5 and all had score of 5. All of these patients had D-dimer >2000 ng/ml while only 2 had elevated SFMC however SFMC in both of these patients was <15 mcg/ml. Of these, one patient with SFMC of 12 mcg/ml had known cirrhosis and the other with an SFMC of 11 mcg/ml had acute decompensation and associated shock liver. This patient also had venous thrombosis 3 days prior to DIC profile and died from complications related to COVID-19 infection. Of the two other patients with high ISTH score and normal SFMC, one had previous chronic thrombocytopenia of <50 x109/L while the other had concomitant admission for acute and recurrent pancreatitis in the setting of alcoholism with acute intoxication. Six patients died within 30 days of admission and in 2/5 performed SFMC was elevated (Figure1C).Conclusion: Compared to 77% of patients with elevated D-dimers, of those tested only 18.5 % of patients had elevated SFMC. It has been hypothesized that the elevated D-dimer noted in COVID-19 pulmonary infection is a direct consequence of acute lung injury and not overt DIC. Although preliminary, the small percentage of patients with overt DIC by ISTH criteria and normal SFMC in the majority of the current cohort support this hypothesis;however studies in a larger more controlled cohort are needed to confirm these findings.

4.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(4): 573-579, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281843

ABSTRACT

Background: Burnout and poor work-life integration (WLI) are prevalent among women physicians. Vacation may help alleviate burnout and improve WLI but working while on vacation may negate these potential benefits. Little is known about the work patterns of women physicians on vacation, and we attempted to further characterize it in this study. Methods: In this online cross-sectional study of 498 members of the Physician Women in Leadership Facebook Group, we collected demographic information, information regarding burnout/WLI, self-reported work patterns while on vacation, and perceived impact of working during vacation on burnout/WLI. We also asked about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on these behaviors. Results: At baseline, 37.5% of respondents reported burnout and 58.4% reported lack of satisfaction with WLI. About 94.4% of respondents reported engaging in some level of work-related behavior while on vacation (primarily answering work-related emails and participating in work-related meetings), but 73.3% reported that such engagement was detrimental to their mental health and WLI. About 66.3% reported an increase in at least one work-related behavior on vacation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Respondents identified and/or endorsed multiple strategies to reduce work-related engagement on vacation, many involving good modeling by leadership and/or national associations. Conclusions: Engagement in work-related behavior while on vacation is almost universal among women physicians, but most feel that it has negative effects on mental health and WLI. Strategies to encourage reduced engagement should be developed/strengthened and endorsed/modeled by those in leadership.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians, Women , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Pandemics
5.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(11): 2467-2486, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-735313

ABSTRACT

A higher risk of thrombosis has been described as a prominent feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This systematic review synthesizes current data on thrombosis risk, prognostic implications, and anticoagulation effects in COVID-19. We included 37 studies from 4070 unique citations. Meta-analysis was performed when feasible. Coagulopathy and thrombotic events were frequent among patients with COVID-19 and further increased in those with more severe forms of the disease. We also present guidance on the prevention and management of thrombosis from a multidisciplinary panel of specialists from Mayo Clinic. The current certainty of evidence is generally very low and continues to evolve.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Minnesota , Thrombosis/etiology
6.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(7): 1467-1481, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634722

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which presents an unprecedented challenge to medical providers worldwide. Although most SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals manifest with a self-limited mild disease that resolves with supportive care in the outpatient setting, patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 will require a multidisciplinary collaborative management approach for optimal care in the hospital setting. Laboratory and radiologic studies provide critical information on disease severity, management options, and overall prognosis. Medical management is mostly supportive with antipyretics, hydration, oxygen supplementation, and other measures as dictated by clinical need. Among its medical complications is a characteristic proinflammatory cytokine storm often associated with end-organ dysfunction, including respiratory failure, liver and renal insufficiency, cardiac injury, and coagulopathy. Specific recommendations for the management of these medical complications are discussed. Despite the issuance of emergency use authorization for remdesivir, there are still no proven effective antiviral and immunomodulatory therapies, and their use in COVID-19 management should be guided by clinical trial protocols or treatment registries. The medical care of patients with COVID-19 extends beyond their hospitalization. Postdischarge follow-up and monitoring should be performed, preferably using telemedicine, until the patients have fully recovered from their illness and are released from home quarantine protocols.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitalization , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
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