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1.
European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists ; 65(Suppl 1):S569-S569, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2073069

ABSTRACT

Introduction The Covid-19 pandemic profoundly affected delivery and accessibility of mental health care services at a time when most needed. The OPTIMA Mood Disorder Service, a specialist bipolar disorder service, adapted group psychoeducation programme for delivery on-line. Objectives We report the feasibility of creating a digital psychoeducation programme. Methods The OPTIMA ten session group psychoeducation programme was converted into a ‘Digital’ intervention using video-conferencing. Sessions offered a range of key topics, derived from the initial Barcelona Group Psychoeducation Programme. At the time of writing, OPTIMA had fully completed two 10 session digital courses. Results A total of 12 people (6 in each group) consented to be part of a service evaluation of the digital groups. Just over half of the participants were women (7/12;58.3%) and one identified as being non-binary (8.3);remaining participants were men. Age of participants ranged from 25 years to 65 years (Mean=42.3;SD=13.1). Data showed a high level of engagement (77%) All participants reported some improvement with a mean Bipolar Self-Efficacy scale (BPSES) post-group score of 105.6 (SD=14.8). At group level, this change was not statistically significant (F (1, 15) = 0.71, p=0.41). At an individual level, two out of five showed a reliable change index >1.96. Conclusions Delivering a ‘digital’ group psychoeducation programme was possible due to careful planning and programme development. There was good uptake from service users suggesting it is a feasible approach with preliminary evidence of clinical benefit. Disclosure No significant relationships.

2.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S916-S917, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041539

ABSTRACT

Background: DT combination has shown efficacy in the adjuvant setting for BRAF-mutated melanoma (BMM) patients (pts) in clinical trials. Previous reports from DESCRIBE-AD resulted in promising overall survival (OS) rates at 12 months. Methods: An observational retrospective study was carried out in 25 GEM sites in Spain. Histologically confirmed and resected BMM pts previously treated with DT according to standard clinical practice in the adjuvant setting were included. Only surgical resection was allowed as a prior treatment to DT. DT discontinuation rate and time to treatment discontinuation were the primary objective. Secondary objectives included safety and efficacy of the combination. Here, we report 3-year results for OS. Results: From 10/2020 to 03/2021, 65 pts were included. Median age was 58 years, 55% were male and 60%, 25%, and 14% had an ECOG PS 0/1/Uk respectively, one patient presented ECOG 3. Allocation of stage IIIA, IIIB and IIIC according to TNM AJCC 7th edition was 29%, 26% and 32%, respectively. There were 3 pts diagnosed at stage I/II but considered of risk, and 2 pts with stage IV but completely resected, all considered for adjuvant DT. Ulceration was present in 40%, Breslow ≥2 mm in 71%, and nodes were microscopically and macroscopically affected in 39% and 22% of pts, respectively. Only 9.2% of pts discontinued DT prematurely due to toxicity and 21.2% had dose reductions to manage toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36.2 m (range: 13-51.1), the overall OS rate at 3-years was 83.5% (95% CI: 74.5-93.5). According to AJCC 7 stage at diagnosis, the 3-years OS rate was 95.2% (95% CI: 86.6-100), 75% (56-100), and 76.8% (60.7-97.2) for stage I-II-IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC-IV respectively. Throughout the study period 11 (16.9%) pts died, of which 10 died due to disease progression and one due to COVID-19 infection. Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with DT for melanoma achieved good treatment compliance and has proven efficacy in the real world. Adjuvant DT has a clinical impact in survival in line with previous clinical trial COMBI-AD. Editorial acknowledgement: We acknowledge Mfar Clinical Research staff for their assistance in the development of this . Legal entity responsible for the study: Grupo Español Multidisciplinar en Melanoma (GEM). Funding: Grupo Español Multidisciplinar en Melanoma (GEM) as Sponsor with Industry partner NOVARTIS. Disclosure: P. Cerezuela-Fuentes: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Consultancy, conference,congress attendance/infrastructure: BMS, MSD, Pierre Fabre, Roche, Sanofi, SunPharma. J. Martín-Liberal: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Lecture fees: Astellas, MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Lecture fees, advisory fees: Bristol Myers Squibb, Novartis, Pierre Fabre, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Member, membership or affiliation: ASCO, ESMO, SEOM, GEM, EORTC, SOGUG, GEIS. L.A. Fernández-Morales: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speak at sponsored meetings: BMS, MSD, Pierre-Fabre, Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Speak at sponsored meetings and advisory role: Novartis. J. Medina Martinez: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Speaker, consultancy or advisory role or similar activity: Novartis, Roche, Pierre Fabre, BMS, MSD, Sanofi. M. Quindós: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, speaker, consultancy and advisory: AstraZeneca, GSK, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novartis, PharmaMar, Roche, Bristol Myers Squibb, Pierre Fabre;Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, Clinical trials: Merck Sharp & Dohme, Roche, Bristol Myers Squibb. A. García Castaño: Non-Financial Interests, Advisory Role: Bristol, MSD, Novartis. T. Puértolas: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker and advisory role: BMS, Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Roche, MSD, Sun-Pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Speaker and advisory role: Pierre-Fabre;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, Clinical trial: Roche, BMS, Apexi en Inc, Aduro Biotech, Alkermes Inc;Non-Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, congresses inscriptions: Lilly, Sun-Pharma, Novartis, Roche, MSD;Non-Financial Interests, Institutional, Leadership Role, Vocal: GEM (Grupo Español Multidisciplinar de Melanoma);Non-Financial Interests, Institutional, Affiliate: SEOM (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica), GEM (Grupo Español Multidisciplinar de Melanoma). P. Ayala de Miguel: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Public speaking: Novartis, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Sanofi, Pierre-Fabré. B. Campos: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Speaker or advisory role: Roche, BMS, Sanofi, Novartis, Pierre-Fabre, Sun Pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Speaker role: AstraZeneca, Merck, ROVI, Leo Pharma. E. Espinosa: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role, Advisory: BMS, MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Advisory, educational activities: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Advisory, educational activities: Pierre Fabre;Financial Interests, Personal, Funding, Funding for translational investigation: Roche;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Member, Vicepresident: Grupo Español Multidisciplinario de Melanoma. A. Rodríguez-Lescure: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Pfizer, Novartis, ROCHE, AstraZeneca, Daiichi Sankyo, Seagen;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Public speaking: Pierre-Fabre;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant, Grant for Clinical Trials: BMS, Lilly, Roche, Novartis, Amgen, Pzifer, Zimeworks, AstraZeneca, G1 Therapeutics, Bayer. L. Espasa Font: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Novartis. G. Belaustegui Ferrández: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Novartis. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

3.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S657, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041523

ABSTRACT

Background: The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor niraparib showed clinical activity in advanced gBRCAm ovarian and breast cancers. LUZERN aims to assess the effectiveness of niraparib plus AI in HR+/HER2–, AI-resistant ABC with a pathogenic variant in homologous recombination-related genes. Here we report findings from the stage 1 interim analysis. Methods: This open-label, single-arm, Simon’s 2-stage, phase II trial is enrolling HR+/HER2– ABC patients (pts) with gBRCAm (cohort A;n=6 in stage 1, n=7 in stage 2) and gBRCA wild-type/HRd (cohort B;n=9 in stage 2). Pts had to have received ≤1 prior line of chemotherapy for ABC, 1–2 prior lines of endocrine therapy for early or ABC with secondary endocrine resistance to the last AI regimen. Pts receive niraparib (200/300mg daily orally) plus AI (same agent given with the prior regimen) on each 28-day cycle. Primary endpoint: clinical benefit rate (CBR) as per RECIST 1.1. Secondary endpoints: overall response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and safety per CTCAE 5.0. If ≥1/6 pts experienced clinical benefit, the trial should proceed to stage 2. Results: Six pts were enrolled in stage 1. Median age was 46 years (range 32–76), 66.7% of pts had visceral disease, and 83.3% had received prior CDK4/6 inhibitor-containing regimen for ABC. At data cut-off, 50.0% of pts were ongoing and median duration of treatment was 4.6 months (range 2.4–5.7). One patient achieved complete response, meeting the criterion to proceed to stage 2. Median investigator-assessed PFS was 5.3 months (95%CI 3.9–NA). The most frequent adverse events (AEs) of any grade (G) were nausea (3 [50.0%]), neutropenia (2 [33.3%];16.7% G3), constipation (2 [33.3%]), and vomiting (1 [16.7%]). Serious AEs occurred in 3 pts (50.0%;G3 COVID-19 pneumonia;G3 pseudomonal bacteriemia;G2 sacral pain). No treatment-related discontinuations/deaths were reported. Conclusions: Niraparib plus AI showed preliminary activity with a tolerable safety profile in gBRCAm HR+/HER2– AI-resistant ABC pts. Based on the steering committee recommendation, enrolment in cohorts A and B is ongoing. Clinical trial identification: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04240106. Legal entity responsible for the study: MEDSIR. Funding: GlaxoSmithKline. Disclosure: J.Á. García Saenz: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Seagen, Gilead;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Novartis, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Eisai, AstraZeneca, Daiichi Sankyo, MSD, Exact Sciences;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: AstraZeneca. J. De la Haba Rodriguez: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Consultant and Advisory Role, Research Funding and Speaking: Pfizer, Novartis, Roche, Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, grant support: Pfizer. J.E. Ales Martínez: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel grant: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: MEDSIR. E. Alba Conejo: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Roche, Novartis, Pfizer, Lilly, BMS, Astrazeneca, Pierre Fabre, Daiichi, Exact Sciences;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Pfizer. J. Balmaña: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: AstraZeneca, Pfizer;Financial Interests, Institutional, Other, Steering committee member: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Medsir, Pfizer. J.M. Perez Garcia: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Lilly,Roche, Eisai, Daichii Sankyo, AstraZeneca, Seattle Genetics, Medsir;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel expenses: Roche. M. Sampayo-Cordero: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, honoraria: Medsir, Syntax for Science, Optimapharm, and Ability pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Medsir;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel expenses: Medsir, Syntax for Science, Optimapharm, and Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, consultant: Medsir, Syntax for Science, and Optimapharm;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Medsir;Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Me sir. A. Malfettone: Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: MEDSIR. J. Cortés: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Roche, Celgene, Cellestia, Astrazeneca, Seattle Genetics, Daiichi Sankyo, Erytech, Athenex, Polyphor, Lilly, Merck Sharp&Dohme, GSK, Leuko, Bioasis, Clovis Oncology, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ellipses, Hibercell, BioInvent, Gemoab, Gilead, Menarini, Zymeworks;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, honoraria: Roche, Novartis, Celgene, Eisai, Pfizer, Samsung Bioepis, Lilly, Merck Sharp&Dohme, Daiichi Sankyo;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Roche, Ariad pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca, Baxalta GMBH/Servier Affaires, Bayer healthcare, Eisai, F.Hoffman-La Roche, Guardanth health, Merck Sharp&Dohme, Pfizer, Piqur Therapeutics, Puma C, Queen Mary University of London.;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: MEDSIR, Nektar Pharmaceuticals, Leuko (relative);Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel, accomodation: Roche, Novartis, Eisai, pfizer, Daiichi Sankyo, Astrazeneca. A. Llombart Cussac: Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role: Eisai, Celgene, Lilly, Pfizer, Roche, Novartis, and MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: MEDSIR and Initia-Research;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Lilly, Roche, Pfizer, Novartis, Pierre-Fabre, GenomicHealth, GSK;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Lilly, AstraZeneca, and MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant: Roche, Foundation Medicine, Pierre-Fabre, and Agendia;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel compensation: Roche, Lilly, Novartis, Pfizer, and AstraZeneca. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

4.
Swiss Medical Weekly ; 152:32S, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2040833

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Oncohematological patients (OHP) with Covid19 (C19) can develop serious and lethal complications. It depends on underlying disease, chemotherapy (ChT) and immunosuppressor (IS) prescribed. Objectives: compare mortality (M) in OHP vs. hospitalized normal hosts (NH);analyze independent risk factors (IRFs) of M. Methods: 3/2020-5/2022;population: OHP with C19. Prospective, observational data collection. Clinical presentation: NIH scale;Active treatment (AT): IS or ChT;Complete C19 vaccination (CV). Statistics: ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests for comparison of groups. Multivariate test to analyze IRFs associated with M. Results: OHP: 62;MM: 19.3%;LLC: 21%;Lymphomas: 24.2%;ALL: 11.3%;AML: 9.7%;MDS: 14.5%. Age: 68 (17-88);Male sex: 77.4%;moderate CAP: 72.6%;Severe CAP: 27.4%;CV: 22.6%;neutropenia (NP): 22.6%;AT: 61.3%. MM was associated with higher M. OD: 5.3 (95% CI 1.1742 -24.1685). OH had higher M statistically significant difference (SSD)- vs. ICP (12/62): 19% vs. (118/1168): 10%;p: 0.02. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex: MM (OR: 5.32, 95% CI: 1.1742-24.1685) and Severe CAP (OD: 11.23, 95% CI: 2.0636 - 61.1310) were IRFs associated with M. AT (OR: 3.2) and NP (OR: 4.18) had higher risk of M with nonSSD;CV (OR: 0.66 95% CI 0.1110-4.0235) had lower risk without SSD. Conclusions: MM and severe CAP were IRFs for M. CAP was associated with higher M in OHP than NH. CV could be a protective factor without SSD. The high M documented in OHP with C19 justifies implementation of early preventive measures and treatment in this population.

5.
Retail and Marketing Review ; 18(1):76-97, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2030779

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic means a major disruption in brick-and-mortar stores. Customer-Facing InStore Technologies (CFIST) perception may be modified as new requirements and concerns arise when interacting in the physical space. Through surveys conducted before and after the COVID-19 lockdown, this study brings relevant findings about the impact of the pandemic in the retailer perception of a specific CFIST technology, Self-Checkout systems (SCO). We used a simplified adoption framework including a new construct, Safety to Use, to analyse the impact of health concerns in CFIST. Results show that both Perceived Enjoyment and Safety to Use are relevant predictors of the Attitude towards SCOs, and that Retailer Perception is strongly influenced by the Attitude towards SCOs. This study is one of the first to study the impact of COVID-19 in retail technology. Results can help to improve the deployment of this technology after the pandemic and may be extended to other CFIST technologies, setting new avenues of research for technology adoption scholars.

6.
8th IEEE International Conference on Smart Computing, SMARTCOMP 2022 ; : 56-61, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2018981

ABSTRACT

Accurately predicting the ridership of public-transit routes provides substantial benefits to both transit agencies, who can dispatch additional vehicles proactively before the vehicles that serve a route become crowded, and to passengers, who can avoid crowded vehicles based on publicly available predictions. The spread of the coronavirus disease has further elevated the importance of ridership prediction as crowded vehicles now present not only an inconvenience but also a public-health risk. At the same time, accurately predicting ridership has become more challenging due to evolving ridership patterns, which may make all data except for the most recent records stale. One promising approach for improving prediction accuracy is to fine-tune the hyper-parameters of machine-learning models for each transit route based on the characteristics of the particular route, such as the number of records. However, manually designing a machine-learning model for each route is a labor-intensive process, which may require experts to spend a significant amount of their valuable time. To help experts with designing machine-learning models, we propose a neural-architecture and feature search approach, which optimizes the architecture and features of a deep neural network for predicting the ridership of a public-transit route. Our approach is based on a randomized local hyper-parameter search, which minimizes both prediction error as well as the complexity of the model. We evaluate our approach on real-world ridership data provided by the public transit agency of Chattanooga, TN, and we demonstrate that training neural networks whose architectures and features are optimized for each route provides significantly better performance than training neural networks whose architectures and features are generic. © 2022 IEEE.

7.
36th IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium Workshops, IPDPSW 2022 ; : 338-345, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2018898

ABSTRACT

Teaching High-Performance Computing (HPC) to undergraduate programs represents a significant challenge in most universities in developing countries like Mexico. Deficien-cies in the required infrastructure and equipment, inadequate curricula in computer engineering programs (and resistance to change them), students' lack of interest, motivation, or knowledge of this area are the main difficulties to overcome. The COVID-19 pandemic represents an additional challenge to these difficulties in teaching HPC in these programs. Despite the detriments, some strategies have been developed to incorporate the HPC concepts to Mexican students without necessarily modifying the traditional curricula. This paper presents a case study over four public universities in Mexico based on our experience as instructors. We also propose a course that introduces the HPC principles considering the heterogeneous background of the students in such universities. The results are about the number of students enrolling in related classes and participating in extra-curricular projects. © 2022 IEEE.

9.
Med Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 2022 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007947
10.
Radioprotection ; 57(3):233-240, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2004805

ABSTRACT

The pandemic situation, originated due to the appearance of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, changed many aspects of our lives and jobs. This health crisis also affected the day-to-day work of radiation protection experts, including the wide range of areas involved in this sector. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of this pandemic on the Spanish radiation protection experts. For that purpose, a Google Forms online survey was developed with 39 questions. The survey covered different aspects related to the work developed by the Spanish professionals, taking into account three different time periods along the pandemic situation. According to this survey, the appearance of COVID-19 modified the labour conditions and modalities of many Spanish radiation protection professionals, especially at the beginning of the pandemic. Most on-site activities were related to the health sector and the nuclear industry, other sectors were more flexible, and the workload increased for half of the surveyed participants. Many operational activities suffered delays due to the pandemic, whereas the one-month wearing period of passive personal dosimeters was extended in most cases during the first Spanish alarm state (15th March 2020 up to the 21st June 2020). Finally, difficulties faced in terms of the working area have been identified and may be useful for the future.

11.
Nutrients ; 14(17)2022 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 lockdowns had a significant impact on people's health, triggering levels of anxiety, perceived stress, and changes in food and nutritional status. OBJECTIVES: To assess the changes in dietary habits, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and liver parameters before and after the COVID-19 lockdown according to changes in intrahepatic fat content in adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and MetS. DESIGN: Pre- and post-lockdown observation of the COVID-19 lockdown on fifty-nine 40-60-year-old participants with MetS and NAFLD, in a parallel group, randomised experiment intended to treat NAFLD. METHODS: Anthropometrics, liver and MetS biochemical parameters, intrahepatic fat content by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and dietary assessment using a validated 148-item Food Frequency Questionnaire were collected pre-COVID-19 lockdown and post-lockdown. RESULTS: COVID-19 lockdown led to negative changes in the liver of patients with NAFLD and MetS, with weight gain and increases in glycemia, ALT and intrahepatic fat content post lockdown. Participants with worsened liver status had low consumption of fibre, cheese, nuts and coffee, and high consumption of sweets and pastries. Participants who improved liver status ameliorated ALT values, waist circumference, and intrahepatic fat content, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging post-lockdown. CONCLUSIONS: The maintenance of healthy lifestyle habits is vital, especially for populations with NAFLD and MetS, to reduce unhealthy lifestyle patterns displayed during lockdown.


Subject(s)
Body Fat Distribution , COVID-19 , Liver , Metabolic Syndrome , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Feeding Behavior , Humans , Liver/diagnostic imaging , Liver/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/diagnostic imaging
12.
Journal of General Internal Medicine ; 37:S222, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1995583

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community health training benefits both residents and community partners, but many experiences are short-term. This project examined a community health track for internal medicine, pediatrics, and family medicine residents who work with community-based organizations (CBOs) longitudinally over two years. METHODS: Faculty conducted focus groups with 2nd and 3rd year residents at two time points to assess program effectiveness and identify challenges. This data was used to understand how the ENHANCE (ENgaging in Health Advocacy through Neighborhood Collaboratives and Education) track prepares residents to form relationships with BOs and cultivate skills in population and community health and research. Four resident focus groups (2020 and 2021) were conducted. Discussions were recorded and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was done by two external evaluators. RESULTS: Fourteen residents participated in focus groups. Figure 1 depicts the themes and subthemes that emerged. Residents in all focus groups said ENHANCE educated them on the steps needed to cultivate CBO relationships and how to incorporate population health into their clinical framework. Residents in the 2020 groups described communication barriers with faculty during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, but these did not persist in 2021 after acclimating to online communication. All four groups said communication barriers were a key facet of their relationship with their CBO, worsened by COVID in 2020. CONCLUSIONS: A longitudinal community health track is a valuable resident learning experience. The ENHANCE track offered opportunities to work with CBOs and integrate community health into clinical care. This track remained beneficial through the pandemic despite challenges with communication and in-person site visits. Limitations include data collection only from a single institution and only resident feedback was included. In the future, we hope to gather qualitative data from faculty and CBO staff. Lessons learned from this data can help refine the ENHANCE track and provide more residents with the opportunity to cultivate collaborative continuing relationships with CBOs.

13.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-753-S-754, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967369

ABSTRACT

Introduction: SARS-CoV-2 has caused the first pandemic of the 21st century with a toll of more than 5 million deaths. Although Mexico is one of the most affected countries, no information regarding liver transplant (LT) recipients is available to date. A higher risk of developing COVID-19 has been reported for these subjects in the literature (cumulative incidence 837.41 cases/105 patients vs. 311.93 cases/105 patients). However, a lower mortality has also been reported (18% vs 27.0% among patients older than 60 years, with no deaths recorded in younger LT recipients). This work aims to further examine these trends. Methods: The study was performed in a single center of liver transplantation in Mexico City. The records of all the LT recipients above 18 years old with COVID-19 confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) between March 2020 and November 2021 were included. Demographic data, comorbidities, cause and date of LT, the immunosuppressive therapy (IT), vaccination status, severity, indication and availability of intensive care unit (ICU) beds, and mortality were extracted. The main outcome was death. Secondary outcomes were severity and need of ICU. Results: Seventy-four LT recipients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were considered. The median age was 54.5 years (45.0-61.3) and 39 patients were men (52.7%). The predominant etiology in our cohort was HCV (27.0%) followed by NASH (21.6%). Mean time from transplantation to infection was 56.2 weeks (33-80). Twenty-one patients had at least 1 vaccine dose at the time of infection (28.4%);15 had a complete scheme (20.2%). Twenty-one (28.4%) patients had severe COVID-19 (Table 1). Overall mortality was 8.10%. No IT treatment was associated with a better or worse prognosis for the whole cohort. Among the vaccinated patients, 4 (19%) had severe COVID-19 with a mean age of 61 years (59-64) and 3 died (mortality 14.3%);All of them had a complete vaccination scheme (1 with BNT162b2, 2 with ChAdOx1 nCoV19) and were taking mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Among the unvaccinated, 17 patients had a severe illness (32.8%) (Figure 1), mean age of 55 years (50-63) and 3 died (mortality 5.6%). However, none of the latter had an ICU bed available. Conclusions: We present the characteristics of LT recipients with SARS-CoV-2 infection at the largest LT center in Mexico. Overall mortality (8%) was lower than that reported in other cohorts of LT recipients and no patient under 57 years old died. A significant numerical reduction in severe cases and the need for critical care was found among vaccinated patients. An association was found between the use of MMF and mortality among vaccinated patients SARS-CoV-2 vaccination should be encouraged and its access guaranteed among LT recipients. (Figure Presented) (Table Presented)

14.
Mathematics ; 10(14), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1964022

ABSTRACT

Air pollution, especially at the ground level, poses a high risk for human health as it can have serious negative effects on the population of certain areas. The high variability of this type of data, which are affected by weather conditions and human activities, makes it difficult for conventional methods to precisely detect anomalous values or outliers. In this paper, classical analysis, statistical process control, and functional data analysis are compared for this purpose. The results obtained motivate the development of a new outlier detector based on the concept of functional directional outlyingness. The validation of this algorithm is perfomed on real air quality data from the city of Gijón, Spain, aiming to detect the proven reduction in NO2 levels during the COVID-19 lockdown in that city. Three more variables (SO2, PM10, and O3) are studied with this technique. The results demonstrate that functional data analysis outperforms the two other methods, and the proposed outlier detector is well suited for the accurate detection of outliers in data with high variability. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

15.
14th Mexican Conference on Pattern Recognition, MCPR 2022 ; 13264 LNCS:56-69, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1919713

ABSTRACT

Obtaining an accurate model for predicting the probability of default is a critical requirement for financial institutions. Nowadays, COVID19 has produced high economic instability bringing borrowers’ delinquencies as well as moratorium regulations. During the KYC process for applicants, it is essential to estimate the probability of default for avoiding write-offs. However, there are several borrowers who, due to the pandemic, could have lost their jobs or decreased their income, producing several borrowers’ delinquencies, even write-offs by frequent delinquencies. Consequently, having a behavioral model for estimating the probability of default during the loan lifetime is vital for financial institutions. Hence, in this paper, we propose the first survival analysis-based approach for predicting the behavioral probability of default. We collected two real financial databases from different countries with different borrowers’ characteristics. From our experimental results, we can conclude that Logistic Hazard provides better results than Deep Hit for predicting the behavioral probability of default. Based on our experimentation and the risk analysis experts, Deep Hit provides inconsistent results for forecasts greater than six months while considering the financial changes due to the COVID19. Otherwise, Logistic Hazard is more accurate in forecasting the behavioral probability of default for a year, and it shows results more appropriate to risk analysis experts. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

16.
J Healthc Qual Res ; 37(5): 335-342, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1921080

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The outbreak of COVID-19 has overwhelmed healthcare systems all over the world. The aim of this article is to describe the process of transforming the Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, the second largest hospital in Spain, into a COVID-19 centre coordinating response to the pandemic in its reference area. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study draws on the experience of the authors in transforming the hospital into a comprehensive resource in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The strategy is based on four central strategies: early planning, coordination of all healthcare agents in its reference area, definition of clear leadership roles, and the organisation of care based on multidisciplinary teams with minimal recruitment of new staff. RESULTS: The transformation strategy enabled the hospital to cope with the surge in patients without exceeding its capacity. During the response phases, which amounted to a period of 57 days, 3106 patients consulted the ER and 2054 were admitted, 346 of whom were treated at the ICU. To accommodate the number of adult COVID-19 patients, adult ICU availability was progressive increased by 371%, and ordinary beds increased by 240. A total of 671 staff members went on sick leave after testing positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The transformation experience of the hospital provides insight into how effectively adapt the structures and functioning of large hospitals. The relevance of territorial coordination during the pandemic is stressed as an effective strategy that contributed coping the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
17.
NODO ; 16(32):8-17, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1912812

ABSTRACT

At present, the paradigm of housing design and construction is approached under economic and environmental analysis schemes. However, this issue has fundamental risks, such as identifying the origin of the problem in essential aspects such as the conception of living and the way in which this action shapes spaces, systems of intervention and appropriation of the environment. The pandemic resulting from the covid-19 outbreak has generated circumstances in which confinement and social distancing regulations have made the limitations of the current paradigm evident in many aspects, particularly the design of housing being one of the most important. For this reason, this article aims to explore and analyze the modern housing paradigm, the problems that have emerged during the pandemic, and present a new paradigm based on the implementation of approaches that seek to explore options to redefine the human condition through knowledge and understanding. technology through concepts such as transhumanism which is proposed as an alternative to overcome the limitations and damages of the modern age;as well as avoiding the search for utilitarian absolutes in the field of the construction of human habitation

18.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 7247, 2022 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890239

ABSTRACT

The pandemic burden caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus constitutes a global public health emergency. Increasing understanding about predisposing factors to infection and severity is now a priority. Genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors can play a crucial role in the course and clinical outcome of COVID-19. We aimed to investigate the putative relationship between genetic factors associated to obesity, metabolism and lifestyle, and the presence and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. A total of 249 volunteers (178 women and 71 men, with mean and ± SD age of 49 ± 11 years) characterized for dietary, lifestyle habits and anthropometry, were studied for presence and severity of COVID-19 infection, and genotyped for 26 genetic variants related to obesity, lipid profile, inflammation, and biorhythm patterns. A statistically significant association was found concerning a protective effect of APOE rs7412 against SARS-CoV-2 infection (p = 0.039; OR 0.216; CI 0.084, 0.557) after correction for multiple comparisons. This protective effect was also ascribed to the APOɛ2 allele (p = 0.001; OR 0.207; CI 0.0796, 0.538). The genetic variant rs7412 resulting in ApoE2, genetic determinant of lipid and lipoprotein levels, could play a significant role protecting against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Apolipoproteins E/genetics , COVID-19 , Adult , Apolipoprotein E2 , COVID-19/genetics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/genetics , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Clinica chimica acta|international journal of clinical chemistry ; 530:S183-S184, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1888134
20.
Clinica chimica acta|international journal of clinical chemistry ; 530:S185-S185, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1888133
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