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1.
Perfusion ; 38(1 Supplement):100-101, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244280

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Cases of fulminant myocarditis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination have been reported. The most severe may need venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-A ECMO) support. Here we report two cases successfully rescued with V-A ECMO. Method(s): We included all the cases supported with V-A ECMO for refractory cardiogenic shock due to myocarditis secondary to a mRNA SARS-COV2 vaccine in the high-volume adult ECMO Program in Vall Hebron University Hospital since January 2020. Result(s): We identified two cases (table). One of them was admitted for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In both, a peripheral V-A ECMO was implanted in the cath lab. An intra-aortic balloon pump was needed in one case for left ventricle unloading. Support could be successfully withdrawn in a mean of five days. No major bleeding or thrombosis complications occurred. Definite microscopic diagnosis could be reached in one case (Image, 3). Treatment was the same, using 1000mg of methylprednisolone/day for 3 days. A cardiac magnetic resonance 10 days after admission showed a significant improvement in systolic function and diffuse oedema and subepicardial contrast intake in different segments (Image, 1-2). Both patients were discharged fully recovered. Conclusion(s): V-A ECMO should be established in cases of COVID-19 vaccine-associated myocarditis with refractory cardiogenic shock during the acute phase. (Table Presented).

2.
Pediatric Dermatology ; 40(Supplement 2):88, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20242434

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mastocytosis encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by an accumulation of clonal mast cells (MC) in the skin and/or internal organs, and symptoms of MC activation. This MC activation can be elucidated by several factors, including infections or vaccination. Objective(s): We present our experience with COVID infection and vaccination in a series of 133 patients with pediatric mastocytosis. Method(s): Between January 1998 and December 2022, 133 pediatric patients have been referred to our hospital owing to clinically suspected MC disorder, mainly with mastocytosis in the skin. The final diagnoses of mastocytosis were established by the presence of typical skin lesions together with an increase of MC numbers in a biopsy from lesional skin or activating KIT mutations in lesional skin tissue. Serum baseline tryptase and total immunoglobulin E levels were measured, and patients underwent a comprehensive allergy workup to confirm atopic status and history of anaphylaxis. Regarding vaccination, REMA's (Spanish Network on Mastocytosis) protocol was followed. Result(s): 13 patients with COVID infection were identified, of which 25 (56,8%) were female and 0% had symptoms of MC activation. All of them had an asymptomatic or mild course of COVID infection. None of the patients experimented MC activation symptoms during viral illness. Regarding COVID vaccination, all patients received premedication with antihistamine 60 minutes prior vaccination. No one experimented immediate reactions and only one patient (0,75%) referred worsening of MC activation symptoms (baseline pruritus, urtication and brain fog) only after the first doses, recovering without changes in his treatment (oral cromoglycate and antihistamine) in two months. Discussion(s): Although MC have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cytokine storm in COVID19, there is no clinical evidence of SARSCoV- 2-induced MC activation, perhaps related to the fact that bone marrow MC lack angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptors.

3.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 82(Suppl 1):1901-1902, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20237220

ABSTRACT

BackgroundPatients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases (IRD) have poorer outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to the general population.ObjectivesTo assess and compare clinical course, severity and complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with rheumatic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) from Mexico and Argentina.MethodsData from both national registries, CMR-COVID (Mexico) and SAR-COVID (Argentina), were combined. Briefly, adult IRD patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were recruited between 08.2020 and 09.2022 in SAR-COVID and between 04.2020 and 06.2022 in CMR-COVID. Sociodemographic data, comorbidities, and DMARDs were recorded, as well as clinical characteristics, complications, and treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Descriptive analysis. Chi square, Fisher, Student T, Mann Whitney U tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed.ResultsA total of 3709 patients were included, 1167 (31.5%) from the CMR-COVID registry and 2542 (68.5%) from the SAR-COVID registry. The majority (82.3%) were women, with a mean age of 50.4 years (SD 14.4). The most frequent IRD were rheumatoid arthritis (47.5%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (18.9%). Mexican patients were significantly older, had a higher female predominance and had higher prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis, antiphospholipid syndrome, and axial spondyloarthritis, while the Argentine patients had more frequently psoriatic arthritis and ANCA-associated vasculitis. In both cohorts, approximately 80% were in remission or low disease activity at the time of infection. Mexicans took glucocorticoids (43% vs 37%, p<0.001) and rituximab (6% vs 3%, p<0.001) more frequently. They also reported more comorbidities (48% vs 43%, p=0.012).More than 90% of patients presented symptoms related to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The frequency of hospitalization was comparable between the groups (23.4%), however, the Mexicans had more severe disease (Figure 1) and a higher mortality rate (9.4% vs 4.0%, p<0.0001). After adjusting for risk factors, Mexicans were more likely to die due to COVID-19 (OR 2.2, 95%CI 1.5-3.1).ConclusionIn this cohort of patients with IRD from Mexico and Argentina with SARS-CoV-2 infection, the majority presented symptoms, a quarter were hospitalized and 6% died due to COVID-19. Mexicans presented more severe disease, and after considering risk factors they were two times more likely to die.REFERENCES:NIL.Acknowledgements:NIL.Disclosure of InterestsCarolina Ayelen Isnardi Grant/research support from: SAR-COVID is a multi- sponsor registry, where Pfizer, Abbvie, and Elea Phoenix provided unrestricted grants. None of them participated or infuenced the development of the project, data collection, analysis, interpretation, or writing the report. They do not have access to the information collected in the database, Deshire Alpizar-Rodriguez: None declared, Marco Ulises Martínez-Martínez: None declared, Rosana Quintana: None declared, Ingrid Eleonora Petkovic: None declared, Sofia Ornella: None declared, Vanessa Viviana Castro Coello: None declared, Edson Velozo: None declared, David Zelaya: None declared, María Severina: None declared, Adriana Karina Cogo: None declared, Romina Nieto: None declared, Dora Aida Pereira: None declared, Iris Jazmin Colunga-Pedraza: None declared, Fedra Irazoque-Palazuelos: None declared, GRETA CRISTINA REYES CORDERO: None declared, Tatiana Sofía Rodriguez-Reyne: None declared, JOSE ANTONIO VELOZ ARANDA: None declared, Cassandra Michele Skinner Taylor: None declared, INGRID MARIBEL JUAREZ MORA: None declared, Beatriz Elena Zazueta Montiel: None declared, Atzintli Martínez: None declared, Cesar Francisco Pacheco Tena: None declared, Guillermo Pons-Estel: None declared.

4.
Salud Publica de Mexico ; 65(3):297-299, 2023.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20235494

ABSTRACT

The National Public Health Institutes (NPHI), members of the Latin American Regional Network of the International Association of National Institutes of Public Health, met face to face at the headquarters of the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico, in the City of Cuernavaca, from October 5 to 7, 2022, with the participation of the directors or their representatives of the NPHIs of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Mexico, Peru and Suriname and representatives of the South American Sub regional Program (SAM), and the Central American Sub regional Program (CAM) of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the Organization of the Amazon Cooperation Treaty (OTCA), the Andean Health Agency/Hipolito Unanue Agreement (ORAS/CONHU) and the Central American Integration System (SICA/COMISCA), analyzing the role of the NPHI in combating health inequities;in confronting the global climate and environmental crisis;combating hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition;successes and challenges in responding to the Covid-19 pandemic;strengthening and continuous improvement of integrated disease surveillance and preparedness for health emergencies;as well as the various existing regional and sub-regional health cooperation programs, noticing that: 1. In the current scenario, the dominating development model is a generator of growing social inequalities, which determine serious inequities in the health conditions of our peoples. 2. Likewise, the current model of production and consumption, adopted at the global level, has increased hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition that possibly constitute nowadays the main health problem in our region. 3. The environmental crisis, which is also a product of the current global development model, has a significant impact on human and animal health and the interaction between both. 4. The NPHIs have played a role of major relevance in confronting the Covid-19 pandemic, not fully applying, however, their full potential for research and for proposing national plans for the disease control. 5. Health surveillance systems, in most of our countries, suffer from significant fragmentation between various sectors and within the health sector itself, implying, in any case, reactive actions that do not allow for anticipating the emergence of new pathologies or health emergencies. 6. The various regional and sub regional cooperation agencies and programs offer an enormous capacity for synergies and mutual cooperation.

5.
Medicina Oral Patologia Oral y Cirugia Bucal ; 28(Supplement 1):S4, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20233582

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 (Coronavirus type 2 causing severe acute respiratory syndrome) presents systemic manifestations such as fever, anosmia, cough, sore throat and headache, dyspnea, tiredness, malaise, diarrhea. There are reports of developing dysgeusia, xerostomia, and vesiculobullous lesions as oral manifestations related to COVID-19. Objective(s): To identify the most prevalent oral manifestations associated with COVID-19 in a group of Paraguayans. Material(s) and Method(s): An electronic survey was used from January to March 2022. Data were presented as frequencies and percentages and analyzed using the chi2 test. Statistical analysis was performed with R software version 4.0.3. Result(s): The sample consisted of 478 people, most female from 15 to 34 years old. 65.48% stated that they had had at least one oral symptom or sign during COVID-19. The loss in the sensation of bitter tastes (34.31%), the alteration of the taste of food (32.43%), and the loss of sweetness (32.01%) were the most prevalent symptoms. In addition, it was found that among the people who developed moderate to severe COVID-19, there was a more significant number (77.78%) of oral manifestations compared to the participants who developed it mildly (63.92%) (chi2;p= 0.044). Conclusion(s): More than half of the respondents presented oral manifestations, more frequent in those who developed moderate to severe COVID-19. Results will serve as a basis for future research and thus strengthen the surveillance of this disease.

6.
Cancer Research Conference: American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, ACCR ; 83(7 Supplement), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20232628

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is preventable with screening, yet remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. Nationally, CRC screening substantially declined during the COVID-19 pandemic and is underutilized by ethnic minorities and in safety-net systems. Therefore, City of Hope partnered with Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and community and faithbased organizations to improve CRC screening among medically underserved communities. METHOD(S): Between October 2020 and October 2022, we implemented a multi-component intervention that included community outreach and education (a multi-ethnic multimedia campaign and community training adapted from the NCI Screen2Save (S2S) program) and clinic-based interventions (provider/staff training and patient education). Intervention reach and training participant surveys were assessed. Within our four FQHC sites, we also compared clinic-level CRC screening rates among age-eligible patients before (June 2021) and after implementation of the clinic-based intervention (June 2022). RESULT(S): Our reach assessment showed that our multi-ethnic multimedia campaign reached 35.4 million impressions, our S2S education training reached 300 diverse community members, and our provider/staff training reached 150 medical providers. Among the 100 providers surveyed, >80% felt confident they could get their patients to complete their CRC screening test and follow-up care. For the clinic-based intervention component, our baseline sample included 11,259 age-eligible patients across the four FQHC sites. Overall CRC screening rates increased from 45% to 52% before vs. after the intervention implementation period. The site with the highest CRC screening rate (>62%) maintained steady rates over the observation period, whereas three sites with lower baseline rates showed greater pre-post improvements (average 15 percentage-point increase). CONCLUSION(S): An overall increase in CRC screening rates was achieved across FQHCs, despite clinic staffing challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. Intervention implementation is ongoing with attempts to document individual, clinic improvements by race/ethnicity.

7.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 82(Suppl 1):533-534, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20232225

ABSTRACT

BackgroundData on cellular and humoral immunogenicity triggered by SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) are limited. While current vaccine efforts have focused on the induction of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, T-cell immunity may also provide protection against infection. Experimental data suggest that CD8+ T cell responses may have a protective role in the presence of decreasing or sub protective antibody titers [1].ObjectivesThe aim of this project is to describe the serological and T cell responses to the third dose of vaccine (either with BNT162b2 mRNA or ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 replication-deficient adenoviral vector vaccines) in a cohort of patients with ARDs (rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathies) treated with biologic therapies, to describe the impact of these treatments on vaccine response in this patient population. As a second objective, we will describe the characteristics of patients who did not present an adequate immunogenic response.MethodsCase-control study. We studied in 79 patients with ARDs and in 31 healthy controls, anti-SARS-CoV-2 specific interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production measured by IGRA between 8-12 weeks after the third dose of anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. In addition, humoral response was measured by anti-S1 IgG antibody production measured by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Statistical comparison between categorical variables was performed by Fisher's or χ2 test. For quantitative variables by Kruskal-Wallis test or Mann-Whitney test.Results79 patients with ARDs (48 women, 31 men;mean age 58±11.4) 43 (54%), with rheumatoid arthritis and 36 (45.6%) with spondyloarthropathies. 32 (49.5%) of them were on glucocorticoid treatment (mean dose 4.92 mg/day), 25 (31.6%) on methotrexate and 56 (70.9%) on anti-TNF. Post-vaccination results showed positive T-cell immune responses in 68 of 79 (86.1%) ARDs patients with mean IFN- γ anti-SARS-CoV-2 titers of 1,606.85 mUI/ml. 7 (8.9%) of ARDs patients showed negative IFN-γ SARS-CoV-2 levels, while 4 (5%) had borderline titers. 100% of patients with previous COVID 19 disease had positive cellular responses. Within the group of negative or borderline cellular responses, 7 of 10 were men (70%), with no significant differences in terms of diagnosis, comorbidities or immunosuppressive treatments used. In the control group, 100% presented positive cellular responses. Anti-Spike IgG antibodies were detectable in all patients with ARDs as in the control group.ConclusionOur preliminary data show that most patients with ARD were able to generate an adequate specific cellular response after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, emphasizing the relevance of vaccination in this group. Specific antibody responses secondary to anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination were detected in all patients with ARD. Our data could support the relevance of these immune responses to personalize prevention, vaccination decision-making and treatment in this subgroup of patients.References[1]Sieiro Santos C, Calleja Antolin S, Moriano Morales C, Garcia Herrero J, Diez Alvarez E, Ramos Ortega F, et al. Immune responses to mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases. RMD Open. 2022 Jan 5;8(1).Figure 1.Specific anti-SARS-CoV-2-IFN- γ responses measured by IGRA. Dotted lines represent positivity cut-off: ≥200mUI/ml. HC: Healthy controls. AIRDs: Autoimmune rheumatic diseases.[Figure omitted. See PDF]Acknowledgements:NIL.Disclosure of InterestsNone Declared.

8.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 12: e37857, 2023 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lactobacillus coryniformis K8 CECT5711 has immune-modulating properties, enhances the immune response to viral antigens leading to the production of specific antibodies, and has anti-inflammatory activity, which may help to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory processes leading to respiratory and other organ failures. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of the consumption of a probiotic strain on the incidence and severity of COVID-19 in health personnel who carry out their professional work among patients with infection or suspected infection by SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This is a double-blind randomized clinical trial in which the experimental group will receive a capsule of L coryniformis K8 per day (3×109 colony former units/day), and the control group will receive a daily placebo capsule consisting of maltodextrin. A sample size of 314 volunteers was calculated. Volunteers must meet the following inclusion criteria: older than 20 years and active health personnel caring for patients with COVID-19, including all professionals such as medical doctors, nurses, and caretakers at the 2 referral hospitals that treat patients with COVID-19. The main outcome of the clinical trial will be the incidence of symptomatic infection by SARS-CoV-2 in personnel who care for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. RESULTS: The study had to be extended to the 2 referral hospitals that treat patients with COVID-19 in the province of Granada (Andalusia, Spain); Hospital San Cecilio and Hospital Virgen de las Nieves. A total of 255 individuals met the inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned to one of the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this randomized controlled trial will provide valuable information regarding the administration of L coryniformis K8 against COVID-19, including whether there are fewer infectious processes due to this virus or, in case of occurrence, whether the disease is milder in participants taking the probiotic strain. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04366180; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04366180. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR1-10.2196/37857.

9.
Texto Livre-Linguagem E Tecnologia ; 16, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20231380

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to learn about the experiences of university teachers during and after emergency remote teaching (ERT), which emerged in the context of isolation due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Its methodology has a qualitative, non-experimental, cross-sectional and descriptive design with a phenomenological approach. As results, the university professors consulted consider that during the ERT, the time dedicated to work increased, both due to meetings outside the timetable and to the creation of educational materials. They express having to use their own resources to teach their subjects online and also detail that there is a lack of technological training. The teachers also commented that they suffered health problems, such as visual weakness, body aches, stress, anxiety and depression. In conclusion, teachers face the situation by updating themselves in information and educational technologies, being flexible and adapting. A limitation of this study is that the sample was obtained with a non-probabilistic method by convenience, in 35 Mexican Institutions of Higher Education (IESM), so it is difficult to generalize these results to all Mexico.

10.
Revista Medica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social ; 61(3):348-355, 2023.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323630

ABSTRACT

Background: A symptom scale can be useful for the standardization of clinical evaluations and follow-up of COVID-19 patients in ambultaroy care. Scale development should be accompanied by an assessment of its reliablility and validity. Objective: To develop and measure the psychometric characteristics of a COVID-19 symptom scale to be answered by either healthcare personnel or adult patients in ambulatory care. Material and methods: The scale was developed by an expert panel using the Delphi method. We evaluated inter-rater reliability, where we defined a good correlation if Spearman's Rho was >= 0.8;test-retest, where we defined a good correlation if Spearman's Rho was >= 0.7;factor analysis using principal component methodology;and discriminant validity using Mann-Whitney's U test. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: We obtained an 8 symptom scale, each symptom is scored from 0-4, with a total minimum score of 0 and a maximum of 32 points. Inter-rater reliability was 0.995 (n = 31), test-retest showed correlation of 0.88 (n = 22), factor analysis detected 4 factors (n = 40) and discriminant capacity of healthy versus sick adults was significant (p < 0.0001, n = 60). Conclusions: We obtained a reliable and valid Spanish (from Mexico) symptom scale for COVID-19 ambulatory care, answerable by patients and health care staff. Copyright © 2023 Revista Medica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.

11.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 31(2):215, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2318132

ABSTRACT

Background: Different viruses employ similar pathways for replication, revealing key intracellular hotspots to target with host-directed therapies and achieve a broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Plitidepsin is a clinically approved antitumoral agent that blocks the elongation factor eEF1A required for protein translation. This drug counteracts SARS-CoV-2 replication and shows a favorable safety profile in COVID-19 patients. Yet, the precise antiviral mechanism of action of plitidepsin remains unknown. Method(s): Here we used a deep quantitative proteomic analysis to measure the impact of plitidepsin on the proteome of SARS-CoV-2-infected Vero E6 cells. This was complemented with transmission electron microscopy assays, which unraveled the subcellular and morphological changes associated to plitidepsin treatment. In addition, we performed functional in vitro assays to dissect the antiviral activity of plitidepsin against SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses. Result(s): We found that this drug inhibited the synthesis of all SARS-CoV-2 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. These included the R1AB polyproteins, which facilitate the synthesis of non-structural proteins involved in the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMV) required for viral replication. Plitidepsin reduced DMV formation and the morphogenesis of new viruses, having a greater impact on viral than on host proteins. Less than 14% of the cellular proteome was significantly affected by plitidepsin, inducing the up-regulation of key molecules associated with protein biosynthesis, such as the translation initiation factors eIF4A2 and eIF2S3. Therefore, plitidepsin induced a compensatory state that rescued protein translation. This proteostatic response explains how cells preserve the cellular proteome after treatment with a translation inhibitor such as plitidepsin. In addition, it suggests that plitidepsin could inhibit other RNA-dependent and non-integrated DNA viruses, as we confirmed in vitro using Zika virus, Hepatitis C virus replicon and Herpes simplex virus. However, the compensatory proteostasis induced by plitidespin also explains why this drug failed to inhibit the replication of integrated DNA proviruses such as HIV-1. Conclusion(s): Unraveling the mechanism of action of host-directed therapies like plitidepsin is imperative to define the indications and antiviral profile of these compounds. This knowledge will be key to develop broad-spectrum treatments and have them ready to deploy when future pandemic viruses break through.

12.
Rev Clin Esp ; 223(5): 281-297, 2023 May.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316837

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 shows different clinical and pathophysiological stages over time. Theeffect of days elapsed from the onset of symptoms (DEOS) to hospitalization on COVID-19prognostic factors remains uncertain. We analyzed the impact on mortality of DEOS to hospital-ization and how other independent prognostic factors perform when taking this time elapsedinto account. Methods: This retrospective, nationwide cohort study, included patients with confirmed COVID-19 from February 20th and May 6th, 2020. The data was collected in a standardized online datacapture registry. Univariate and multivariate COX-regression were performed in the generalcohort and the final multivariate model was subjected to a sensitivity analysis in an earlypresenting (EP; < 5 DEOS) and late presenting (LP; ≥5 DEOS) group. Results: 7915 COVID-19 patients were included in the analysis, 2324 in the EP and 5591 in theLP group. DEOS to hospitalization was an independent prognostic factor of in-hospital mortalityin the multivariate Cox regression model along with other 9 variables. Each DEOS incrementaccounted for a 4.3% mortality risk reduction (HR 0.957; 95% CI 0.93---0.98). Regarding variationsin other mortality predictors in the sensitivity analysis, the Charlson Comorbidity Index onlyremained significant in the EP group while D-dimer only remained significant in the LP group. Conclusion: When caring for COVID-19 patients, DEOS to hospitalization should be consideredas their need for early hospitalization confers a higher risk of mortality. Different prognosticfactors vary over time and should be studied within a fixed timeframe of the disease.

13.
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless ; : 1-13, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2308014

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccines mitigate severe disease, yet uptake remains low among people experiencing homelessness (PEH) despite the risk of transmission in congregate settings like homeless shelters. This study evaluated retrospective COVID-19 vaccination intent and decision-making between March 2020-October 2021 to identify modifiable factors to improve vaccine acceptance among PEH. We conducted 31 semi-structured interviews and eight focus group discussions across six homeless shelters in Seattle-King County, Washington. Residents and staff aged >= 18 years were recruited through purposive sampling for interviews and convenience sampling for focus groups. Thematic analysis was conducted. Participants reported that too much contradictory and changing information about COVID-19 vaccines led to confusion. Information deemed trustworthy contributed to individual's knowledge and in some cases changed their vaccination intent. While many intended to get vaccinated without external motivators, others were motivated by incentives and requirements. Despite intention to vaccinate, participants reported barriers to COVID-19 vaccine access including availability of vaccine doses, timely eligibility for vaccination, and availability of appointments. Participants presented recommendations to improve COVID-19 information content and dissemination, access, and use of incentives in shelter settings. Future research should test recommended vaccination strategies rooted in the voices and experiences of PEH to determine feasibility and effectiveness in shelter settings.

15.
Research in Administrative Sciences under COVID-19 ; : 67-88, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2299658

ABSTRACT

Universities play a key role in the production and transfer of knowledge. The purpose of this research is to describe practices of knowledge management at UNAM in response to COVID-19. A qualitative methodology is used. Through documentary research, information was collected to present four descriptive case studies to identify elements that characterise a knowledgeintensive organisation through the value chain model. This chapter begins with a review of the literature on the creation and transfer of knowledge from universities to society in the context of COVID-19. The knowledge value chain concept is integrated in order to model elements related to both infrastructure and processes that have allowed for continuity in the development of knowledge production and transfer activities. These results contribute to the modelling of management practices to create value in organisations. © 2022 Emerald Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.

16.
Revista clinica espanola ; 2023.
Article in Spanish | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2299346

ABSTRACT

Antecedentes La COVID-19 muestra diferentes fases clínicas y fisiopatológicas a lo largo del tiempo. El efecto de los días transcurridos desde el comienzo de los síntomas (DTCS) hasta la hospitalización sobre los factores pronósticos de la COVID-19 sigue siendo incierto. Analizamos el impacto en la mortalidad de los DTCS hasta la hospitalización y cómo se comportan otros factores pronósticos independientes al tener en cuenta dicho tiempo transcurrido. Métodos En este estudio de cohortes nacional retrospectivo se incluyó a pacientes con COVID-19 confirmada entre el 20 de febrero y el 6 de mayo de 2020. Los datos se recopilaron en un registro normalizado de captura de datos en línea. Se realizó una regresión de Cox uni y multifactorial en la cohorte general y el modelo multifactorial final se sometió a un análisis de sensibilidad en un grupo de presentación precoz (PP) < 5 DTCS y otro de presentación tardía (PT) ≥ 5 DTCS). Resultados En el análisis se incluyó a 7.915 pacientes con COVID-19, 2.324 en el grupo de PP y 5.591 en el de PT. Los DTCS hasta la hospitalización fueron un factor pronóstico independiente de mortalidad intrahospitalaria en el modelo de regresión de Cox multifactorial junto con otras nueve variables. Cada incremento en un DTCS supuso una reducción del riesgo de mortalidad del 4,3% (RRI = 0,957;IC 95%, 0,93-0,98). En cuanto a las variaciones de otros factores predictivos de la mortalidad en el análisis de sensibilidad, únicamente el índice de comorbilidad de Charlson siguió siendo significativo en el grupo de PP, mientras que únicamente el dímero D lo siguió siendo en el grupo de PT. Conclusiones Al atender a pacientes con COVID-19 hay que tener en cuenta los DTCS hasta la hospitalización porque la necesidad de hospitalización precoz confiere un mayor riesgo de mortalidad. Los diferentes factores pronósticos varían con el tiempo y deberían estudiarse dentro de un marco temporal fijo de la enfermedad.

17.
Duazary ; 19(2):106-115, 2022.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2264763

ABSTRACT

Analyzing the effect of the variables Eating Habits, Emotional Condition and Physical Activity (PA) Agency on Diet Perception and PA Time, in Colombian university students under COVID-19 confinement conditions. Preliminary correlational research was conducted through a comparative survey with both exploratory and explanatory scope. It was applied to 389 students who voluntarily completed the instrument on a Google Form. The structural model explains respectively 38% and 53% of the variability of the students' diet perception and PA time. The model shows both statistical (X2 = 84 [47 gl p = 0,09]) and practical (IBBAN = 96;IBBANN = 99;IAC = 0,99 and RMSEA = 0,02 [0,00, 0,04]) goodness of fit. Hence, it can be stated that this inclusive model has the same explanatory power as the saturated one, which relates all variables to each other. Eating habits and intention were found to have a direct effect on the university students' diet perception. Just as well, eating habits, intention and diet perception were observed to increase PA time.

18.
Acta Ortop Mex ; 36(3):179-184, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255870

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: distal biceps tendon injury commonly occurs in male patients between the fifth and sixth decade of life. The mechanism of the injury is an eccentric contraction with the elbow in flexion of 90 degrees. For its surgical treatment, several options have been described in the literature with different approaches, type of suture to be used and various methods of fixing the repair of the distal biceps tendon. The musculoskeletal clinical manifestations of COVID-19 are fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, but the musculoskeletal effects of COVID-19 remain unclear. CASE REPORT: 46-year-old COVID-19 positive male patient with acute distal biceps tendon injury and secondary to minimal trauma, with no other risk factors. The patient was treated surgically following orthopedic and safety guidelines for the patient and medical staff due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The surgical procedure of the double tension slide (DTS) technique with a single incision in a reliable option and our case of a low morbidity, few complications and a good cosmetic option. CONCLUSION: the management of orthopedic pathologies in COVID-19 positive patients is increasing as well as the ethical and orthopedic implications of the management of these injuries and/or the delay of their care during the pandemic.

19.
Sociedad y Ambiente ; 24, 2021.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2253841

ABSTRACT

The possession of exotic animals as pets is a social practice that has become more visible in Mexico in recent years, so it is interesting to understand its environmental and social implications and those related to human health. The present study aims to identify the main species of exotic animals kept as pets and the zoonotic diseases reported in these species. We analyzed official figures of seizures of exotic fauna in Mexico and reviewed specialized literature on zoonotic diseases documented in Mexico in these species. We identified zoonoses in species of fauna that can be acquired legally and illegally in the country, reported in environments in which animals coexist with other species and are in direct contact with people, which represents an important factor in the spread and propensity of this type of disease. We conclude that the sanitary regulation of wildlife markets, the monitoring and studying microorganisms associated with wildlife are valuable strategies to prevent the emergence of zoonoses.

20.
European Journal of Clinical Investigation ; 52(11), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2278001

ABSTRACT

The objective of this work is to expand the information provided in the ATAC study, showing the viral load measurements by means of RT-qPCR in tracheobronchial samples from a group of patients with moderate COVID-19, before and after 5 days of standard treatment with aprotinin compared with standard treatment with placebo. The samples of the current study were rescued from participants of a multicentre, double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized phase III trial, performed in four Spanish hospitals with the same inclusion criteria at baseline. Viral load was compared between placebo group and aprotinin-treated group at two time points. At the pre-time (i.e. day 0 before treatment), no significant differences were observed between groups. However, at post-time (i.e. treatment day 5), viral load levels were significantly lower in the aprotinin-treated group. Additionally, a comparative analysis was performed between the placebo group and the aprotinin group. A significantly shorter treatment time was observed in the aprotinin-treated group (p = 0.032), as well as a greater decrease in viral load (p = 0.016). The remaining variables showed no differences between both groups.

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