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1.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(6): 667-678, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899121

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severely ill patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop circulatory failure. We aimed to report patterns of left and right ventricular dysfunction in the first echocardiography following admission to intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive study that collected echocardiographic and clinical information from severely ill COVID-19 patients admitted to 14 ICUs in 8 countries. Patients admitted to ICU who received at least one echocardiography between 1st February 2020 and 30th June 2021 were included. Clinical and echocardiographic data were uploaded using a secured web-based electronic database (REDCap). RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-seven patients were included and the first echo was performed 2 [1, 4] days after ICU admission. The median age was 65 [56, 73] years, and 71% were male. Left ventricle (LV) and/or right ventricle (RV) systolic dysfunction were found in 234 (34.5%) patients. 149 (22%) patients had LV systolic dysfunction (with or without RV dysfunction) without LV dilatation and no elevation in filling pressure. 152 (22.5%) had RV systolic dysfunction. In 517 patients with information on both paradoxical septal motion and quantitative RV size, 90 (17.4%) had acute cor pulmonale (ACP). ACP was associated with mechanical ventilation (OR > 4), pulmonary embolism (OR > 5) and increased PaCO2. Exploratory analyses showed that patients with ACP and older age were more likely to die in hospital (including ICU). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of this cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients exhibited abnormal LV and/or RV systolic function in their first echocardiography assessment. While LV systolic dysfunction appears similar to septic cardiomyopathy, RV systolic dysfunction was related to pressure overload due to positive pressure ventilation, hypercapnia and pulmonary embolism. ACP and age seemed to be associated with mortality in this cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Pulmonary Embolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Retrospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging
2.
J Clin Med ; 11(7)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in patients with COVID-19, however, its mechanism is still controversial, particularly in ICU settings. Urinary proteinuria profile could be a non-invasive tool of interest to scrutinize the pathophysiological process underlying AKI in COVID-19 patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study between March 2020 and April 2020. All patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and without end-stage kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy before ICU admission were included. Our objectives were to assess the incidence and risk factors for AKI and to describe its clinical and biological characteristics, particularly its urinary protein profile. RESULTS: Seventy patients were included; 87% needed mechanical ventilation and 61% needed vasopressor during their ICU stay; 64.3% of patients developed AKI and half of them needed dialysis. Total and tubular proteinuria on day 1 were higher in patients with AKI, whereas glomerular proteinuria was similar in both groups. The main risk factor for AKI was shock at admission (OR = 5.47 (1.74-17.2), p < 0.01). Mortality on day 28 was higher in AKI (23/45, 51.1%) than in no-AKI patients (1/25, 4%), p < 0.001. Risk factors for 28-days mortality were AKI with need for renal replacement therapy, non-renal SOFA score and history of congestive heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: AKI is common in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in ICU; it seems to be related to tubular lesions rather than glomerular injury and is related to shock at ICU admission.

5.
Thromb Haemost ; 121(8): 1031-1042, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324458

ABSTRACT

Hemostatic changes induced by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support have been yet poorly documented in coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) patients who have a baseline complex hypercoagulable state. In this prospective monocentric study of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) rescued by ECMO, we performed longitudinal measurements of coagulation and fibrinolysis markers throughout the course of ECMO support in 20 COVID-19 and 10 non-COVID-19 patients. Blood was sampled before and then 24 hours, 7, and 14 days after ECMO implantation. Clinical outcomes were prospectively assessed until discharge from the intensive care unit or death. The median age of participants was 47 (35-56) years, with a median body mass index of 30 (27-35) kg/m2, and a Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score of 12 (8-16). Baseline levels of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, factor VIII, prothrombin F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin, D-dimer, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were elevated in both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 ARDS patients, indicating that endothelial activation, endogenous thrombin generation, and fibrinolysis shutdown occur in all ARDS patients before ECMO implantation. From baseline to day 7, thrombin generation (prothrombin F1 + 2, p < 0.01) and fibrin formation markers (fibrin monomers, p < 0.001) significantly increased, further resulting in significant decreases in platelet count (p < 0.0001) and fibrinogen level (p < 0.001). PAI-1 levels significantly decreased from baseline to day 7 (p < 0.0001) in all ARDS patients. These changes were more marked in COVID-19 patients, resulting in 14 nonfatal and 3 fatal bleeding. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether monitoring of thrombin generation and fibrinolysis markers might help to early predict bleeding complications in COVID-19 patients supported by ECMO.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Fibrinolysis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
6.
J Intensive Care ; 9(1): 12, 2021 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sepsis is characterized by various hemodynamic alterations which could happen concomitantly in the heart, pulmonary and systemic circulations. A comprehensive demonstration of their interactions in the clinical setting of COVID-19 sepsis is lacking. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility, clinical implications, and physiological coherence of the various indices of hemodynamic function and acute myocardial injury (AMI) in COVID-19 sepsis. METHODS: Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data of septic critically ill COVID-19 patients were prospectively recorded. A dozen hemodynamic indices exploring contractility and loading conditions were assessed. Several cardiac biomarkers were measured, and AMI was considered if serum concentration of high-sensitive troponin T (hs-TNT) was above the 99th percentile, upper reference. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients were assessed (55 males), with a median age of 61 [50-70] years. Overall, the feasibility of echocardiographic parameters was very good, ranging from 93 to 100%. Hierarchical clustering method identified four coherent clusters involving cardiac preload, left ventricle (LV) contractility, LV afterload, and right ventricle (RV) function. LV contractility indices were not associated with preload indices, but some of them were positively correlated with RV function parameters and negatively correlated with a single LV afterload parameter. In most cases (n = 36, 54%), echocardiography results prompted therapeutic changes. Mortality was not influenced by the echocardiographic variables in multivariable analysis. Cardiac biomarkers' concentrations were most often increased with high incidence of AMI reaching 72%. hs-TNT was associated with mortality and inversely correlated with most of LV and RV contractility indices. CONCLUSIONS: In this comprehensive hemodynamic evaluation in critically ill COVID-19 septic patients, we identified four homogeneous and coherent clusters with a good feasibility. AMI was common and associated with alteration of LV and RV functions. Echocardiographic assessment had a clinical impact on patient management in most cases.

9.
Ann Intensive Care ; 10(1): 151, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992558

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In COVID-19 patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the relatively preserved respiratory system compliance despite severe hypoxemia, with specific pulmonary vascular dysfunction, suggests a possible hemodynamic mechanism for VA/Q mismatch, as hypoxic vasoconstriction alteration. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO)-almitrine combination to restore oxygenation in severe COVID-19 ARDS (C-ARDS) patients. METHODS: We conducted a monocentric preliminary pilot study in intubated patients with severe C-ARDS. Respiratory mechanics was assessed after a prone session. Then, patients received iNO (10 ppm) alone and in association with almitrine (10 µg/kg/min) during 30 min in each step. Echocardiographic and blood gases measurements were performed at baseline, during iNO alone, and iNO-almitrine combination. The primary endpoint was the variation of oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2 ratio). RESULTS: Ten severe C-ARDS patients were assessed (7 males and 3 females), with a median age of 60 [52-72] years. Combination of iNO and almitrine outperformed iNO alone for oxygenation improvement. The median of PaO2/FiO2 ratio varied from 102 [89-134] mmHg at baseline, to 124 [108-146] mmHg after iNO (p = 0.13) and 180 [132-206] mmHg after iNO and almitrine (p < 0.01). We found no correlation between the increase in oxygenation caused by iNO-almitrine combination and that caused by proning. CONCLUSION: In this pilot study of severe C-ARDS patients, iNO-almitrine combination was associated with rapid and significant improvement of oxygenation. These findings highlight the role of pulmonary vascular function in COVID-19 pathophysiology.

11.
Ann Intensive Care ; 10(1): 108, 2020 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696210

ABSTRACT

Hypoxemia is the main feature of COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (C-ARDS), but its underlying mechanisms are debated, especially in patients with low respiratory system elastance (Ers). We assessed 60 critically ill patients hospitalized in our intensive care unit for C-ARDS. We used contrast transthoracic echocardiography to assess patent foramen ovale (PFO) shunt and transpulmonary bubble transit (TPBT). The median Ers was 32 cmH2O/L. PFO shunt was detected in six (10%) patients and TPBT in 12 (20%) patients. PFO shunt and TPBT were similar in patients with higher or lower Ers. In conclusion, PFO and TPBT do not seem to be the main drivers of hypoxemia in C-ARDS, especially in patients with lower Ers.

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