Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 37
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Thromb Haemost ; 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is still unclear if patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have different rate, typology, and impact of thrombosis on survival. METHODS: In this multicentre observational cohort study 1.138 patients, hospitalized for CAP (n=559) or COVID-19 (n=579) from 7 clinical centres in Italy, were included in the study. Consecutive adult patients (age ≥18 years) with confirmed COVID-19 related pneumonia, with or without mechanical ventilation, hospitalized from 1st March 2020 to 30 April 2020, were enrolled. Covid-19 was diagnosed based on the WHO interim guidance. Patients were followed-up until discharge or in-hospital death, registering the occurrence of thrombotic events including ischemic/embolic events. RESULTS: During the in-hospital stay, 11.4% of CAP and 15.5% of COVID-19 patients experienced thrombotic events (p=0.046). In CAP patients all the events were arterial thromboses, while in COVID-19 patients 8.3% were venous and 7.2% arterial thromboses. During the in-hospital follow-up, 3% of CAP patients and 17% of COVID-19 patients died (p<0.001). The highest mortality rate was found among COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (47.6% vs 13.4% in thrombotic-event free patients; p<0.001). In CAP, 13.8% of patients experiencing thrombotic events died vs. 1.8% of thrombotic event-free ones (p<0.001). A multivariable COX-regression analysis confirmed a higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (HR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.3; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with CAP, COVID-19 is characterized by a higher burden of thrombotic events, different thrombosis typology and higher risk of thrombosis-related in-hospital mortality.

2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547312

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to assess the effect of contact time, contact distance and the use of personal protective equipment on the determination of SARS-CoV-2 infection in healthcare workers (HCWs). This study consists of an analysis of data gathered for safety reasons at the Sapienza Teaching Hospital Policlinico Umberto I in Rome through the surveillance system that was put into place after the worsening of the COVID-19 pandemic. The studied subjects consist of HCWs who were put under health surveillance, i.e., all employees who were in contact with subjects who were confirmed to have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The HCWs under surveillance were monitored for a period encompassing ten days after the date of contact, during which they undertook nasopharyngeal swab tests analysed through RT-PCR (RealStar® SARS-CoV-2 Altona Diagnostic-Germany). Descriptive and univariate analyses have been undertaken, considering the following as risk factors: (a) no personal protective equipment use (PPE); (b) Distance < 1 m between the positive and contact persons; (c) contact time > 15'. Finally, a Cox regression and an analysis of the level of synergism between factors, as specified by Rothman, were carried out. We analysed data from 1273 HCWs. Of these HCWs, 799 (62.8%) were females, with a sample average age of 47.8 years. Thirty-nine (3.1%) tested positive during surveillance. The overall incidence rate was 0.4 per 100 person-days. Time elapsed from the last exposure and a positive RT-PCR result ranged from 2 to 17 days (mean = 7, median = 6 days). In the univariate analysis, a distance <1 m and a contact time > 15' proved to be risk factors for the SARS-CoV-2 infection, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.62 (95% CI: 1.11-6.19) and 3.59 (95% IC: 1.57-8.21), respectively. The synergism analysis found the highest synergism between the "no PPE use" x "Contact time". The synergy index S remains strongly positive also in the analysis of the factors "no PPE use" x "Distance" and "Time of contact" x "Distance". This study confirms the absolute need to implement safety protocols during the pandemic and to use the correct PPE within health facilities in order to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. The analysis shows that among the factors considered (contact time and distance, no use of PPE), there is a strong synergistic effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , Contact Tracing , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 102(1): 115586, 2021 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505932

ABSTRACT

We determined the kinetics of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody response in fifteen hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Patients were divided into mild/moderate (mild, n = 1; moderate, n = 4) or severe (n = 10) and virus-specific anti-Nucleocapsid IgM, anti-Spike IgG and anti-Spike IgA were measured in serial serum samples collected 0 to 15 days after hospital admission. Surrogate neutralization assays were performed by testing inhibition of ACE-2 binding to Spike. In 3 patients (2 severe and 1 moderate case), serum antibodies and T-cell memory were monitored 6 months after baseline. Although IgM response tended to appear first, patients affected by less severe disease were more prone to an early IgG/IgA response. Neutralization of Spike binding to ACE2 correlated with anti-Spike IgG and IgA. IgG and IgA antibody response persisted at the 6 months follow-up. A recall T-cell response to the Spike antigen was observed in 2 out of 3 patients, not related to disease severity.

4.
Intern Emerg Med ; 2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460479

ABSTRACT

We studied the predictive value of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio for classifying COVID-19-positive patients who will develop severe clinical outcomes. One hundred fifty patients were recruited and categorized into two distinct populations ("A" and "B"), according to the indications given by the World Health Organization. Patients belonging the population "A" presented with mild disease not requiring oxygen support, whereas population "B" presented with a severe disease needing oxygen support. The AUC curve of PaO2/FiO2 in the discovery cohort was 0.838 (95% CI 0.771-0.908). The optimal cut-off value for distinguishing population "A" from the "B" one, calculated by Youden's index, with sensitivity of 71.79% and specificity 85.25%, LR+4.866, LR-0.339, was < 274 mmHg. The AUC in the validation cohort of 170 patients overlapped the previous one, i.e., 0.826 (95% CI 0.760-0.891). PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 274 mmHg was a good predictive index test to forecast the development of a severe respiratory failure in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. Moreover, our work highlights that PaO2/FiO2 ratio, compared to inflammatory scores (hs-CRP, NLR, PLR and LDH) indicated to be useful in clinical managements, results to be the most reliable parameter to identify patients who require closer respiratory monitoring and more aggressive supportive therapies. Clinical trial registration: Prognostic Score in COVID-19, prot. NCT04780373 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04780373 (retrospectively registered).

5.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 105(1): 115539, 2021 Sep 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401414

ABSTRACT

We determined the kinetics of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody response in fifteen hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Patients were divided into mild/moderate (mild, n = 1; moderate, n = 4) or severe (n = 10) and virus-specific anti-Nucleocapsid IgM, anti-Spike IgG and anti-Spike IgA were measured in serial serum samples collected 0 to 15 days after hospital admission. Surrogate neutralization assays were performed by testing inhibition of ACE-2 binding to Spike. In 3 patients (2 severe and 1 moderate case), serum antibodies and T-cell memory were monitored 6 months after baseline. Although IgM response tended to appear first, patients affected by less severe disease were more prone to an early IgG/IgA response. Neutralization of Spike binding to ACE2 correlated with anti-Spike IgG and IgA. IgG and IgA antibody response persisted at the 6 months follow-up. A recall T-cell response to the Spike antigen was observed in 2 out of 3 patients, not related to disease severity.

6.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257376, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403324

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Tocilizumab (with or without corticosteroids) in a real-life context among moderate-to-severe COVID-19 patients hospitalized at the Infectious Diseases ward of two hospitals in Lazio region, Italy, during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among moderate-to-severe COVID-19 pneumonia to assess the influence of tocilizumab (with or without corticosteroids) on: 1) primary composite outcome: risk for death/invasive mechanical ventilation/ICU-transfer at 14 days from hospital admission; 2) secondary outcome: COVID-related death only. Both outcomes were also assessed at 28 days and restricted to baseline more severe cases. We also evaluated the safety of tocilizumab. RESULTS: Overall, 412 patients were recruited, being affected by mild (6.8%), moderate (66.3%) or severe (26.9%) COVID-19 at baseline. The median participant' age was 63 years, 56.5% were men, the sum of comorbidities was 1.34 (±1.44), and the median time from symptom onset to hospital admission was 7 [3-10] days. Patients were subdivided in 4 treatment groups: standard of care (SoC) only (n = 172), SoC plus corticosteroid (n = 65), SoC plus tocilizumab (n = 50), SoC plus tocilizumab and corticosteroid (n = 125). Twenty-six (6.3%) patients underwent intubation, and 37 (9%) COVID-related deaths were recorded. After adjusting for several factors, multivariate analysis showed that tocilizumab (with or without corticosteroids) was associated to improved primary and secondary outcomes at 14 days, and at 28-days only when tocilizumab administered without corticosteroid. Among more severe cases the protective effect of tocilizumab (± corticosteroids) was observed at both time-points. No safety concerns were recorded. CONCLUSION: Although contrasting results from randomized clinical trials to date, in our experience tocilizumab was a safe and efficacious therapeutic option for patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Its efficacy was improved by the concomitant administration of corticosteroids in patients affected by severe-COVID-19 pneumonia at baseline.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
7.
Brain Sci ; 11(9)2021 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390537

ABSTRACT

Individuals affected by Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) may experience psychiatric symptoms, including depression and suicidal ideation, that could lead to chronic impairment and a reduction in quality of life. Specifically, depressive disorder shows high incidence and may lead to chronic impairment and a reduction in the quality of life. To date, no studies on the presence of suicidality and quantitative analysis of depressive symptoms and their risk factors have yet been published. In this study, we aim to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and related risk factors at 3 months after discharge to home care following hospitalization for COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Participants were contacted three months after hospital discharge from one of the five COVID-19 hospitals in Rome, as part of a larger project on health outcomes in COVID-19 inpatients (Long Term Neuropsychiatric Disorder in COVID-19 Project), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was administered by telephone interview. RESULTS: Of 115 participants, 14.8% (N = 17) received a PHQ-9-based diagnosis of depression, and n = 7 of them scored 1 or more on the item on suicidality. A linear regression model showed the predictive role of female sex, pulmonary chronic condition and previous mental disorder in the development of depressive disorder; the latter was confirmed also by binary logistic regression. Severity indexes of disease (length of hospitalization and intensive care treatment) were found not to be associated with the development of depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: A small but clinically meaningful number of participants in the current study reported that they experienced symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation 3 months post-discharge from their COVID-19 hospitalization. In particular, given the findings that a history of prior psychiatric disorders was predictive of the development of depression symptoms, clinicians should carefully monitor for the presence of all psychiatric symptoms at follow-up visits.

8.
J Clin Med ; 10(17)2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Remdesivir is currently approved for the treatment of COVID-19. The recommendation for using remdesivir in patients with COVID-19 was based on the in vitro and in vivo activity of this drug against SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study conducted on a population of patients hospitalized for COVID-19. The primary endpoint of this study was the impact of remdesivir-containing therapy on 30-day mortality; the secondary endpoint was the impact of remdesivir-containing therapy on the need for high-flow oxygen therapy (HFNC), non-invasive ventilation (NIV), or mechanical ventilation. The data were analyzed after propensity score matching. RESULTS: A total of 407 patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia were consecutively enrolled. Out of these, 294 (72.2%) were treated with remdesivir and 113 (27.8%) were not. Overall, 61 patients (14.9%) were treated during hospitalization with HFNC, NIV, or mechanical ventilation, while 30-day mortality was observed in 21 patients (5.2%). Univariate analysis of patients treated with remdesivir or not showed no differences in 30-day mortality (4% vs. 6%, p = 0.411) in the two study groups. Cox regression analysis, after propensity score matching, showed that therapies, including remdesivir-containing therapy, were not statistically associated with 30-day survival or mortality. The Kaplan-Meier curves of 30-day survival in patients treated with remdesivir or not before (p = 0.24) and after (p = 0.88) propensity score matching showed no differences between the two study groups. Finally, patients treated with remdesivir or not showed the same need for HFNC/NIV or mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: This real-life experience of remdesivir use in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 was not associated with significant increases in rates of survival or reduced use of HFNC/NIV or mechanical ventilation compared with patients treated with other therapies not including remdesivir.

9.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(8)2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335021

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 may show no peculiar signs and symptoms that may differentiate it from other infective or non-infective etiologies; thus, early recognition and prompt management are crucial to improve survival. The aim of this study was to describe clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics and outcomes of hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to those with other infective or non-infective etiologies. METHODS: We performed a prospective study from March 2020 to February 2021. All patients hospitalized for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 were prospectively recruited. All patients were evaluated according to a predefined protocol for diagnosis of suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. The primary endpoint was evaluation of clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics associated or not with COVID-19 etiology at time of hospitalization in an emergency department. RESULTS: A total of 1036 patients were included in the study: 717 (69%) patients with confirmed COVID-19 and 319 (31%) without COVID-19, hospitalized for other causes. The main causes of hospitalization among non-COVID-19 patients were acute heart failure (44%) and bacterial pneumonia (45.8%). Overall, 30-day mortality was 9% among the COVID-19 group and 35% in the non-COVID-19 group. Multivariate analysis showed variables (fever > 3 days, dry cough, acute dyspnea, lymphocytes < 1000 × 103/µL, and ferritin > 250 ng/mL) independently associated with COVID-19 etiology. A decision tree was elaborated to early detect COVID-19 patients in the emergency department. Finally, Kaplan-Meier curves on 30-day survival in COVID-19 patients during the first wave (March-May 2020, n = 289 patients) and the second wave (October-February 2021, n = 428 patients) showed differences between the two study periods (p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 may show peculiar characteristics at time of hospitalization that could help physicians to distinguish from other infective or non-infective etiologies. Finally, a different 30-day mortality rate was observed during different periods of the pandemic.

10.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(5): 1231-1237, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293431

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) may experience venous thrombosis while data regarding arterial thrombosis are sparse. METHODS: Prospective multicenter study in 5 hospitals including 373 patients with Covid-19-related pneumonia. Demographic data, laboratory findings including coagulation tests and comorbidities were reported. During the follow-up any arterial or venous thrombotic events and death were registered. RESULTS: Among 373 patients, 75 (20%) had a thrombotic event and 75 (20%) died. Thrombotic events included 41 venous thromboembolism and 34 arterial thrombosis. Age, cardiovascular disease, intensive care unit treatment, white blood cells, D-dimer, albumin and troponin blood levels were associated with thrombotic events. In a multivariable regression logistic model, intensive care unit treatment (Odds Ratio [OR]: 6.0; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 2.8-12.6; p < 0.001); coronary artery disease (OR: 2.4; 95% CI 1.4-5.0; p = 0.022); and albumin levels (OR: 0.49; 95% CI 0.28-0.87; p = 0.014) were associated with ischemic events. Age, sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, heart failure, coronary heart disease, intensive care unit treatment, in-hospital thrombotic events, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, troponin, and albumin levels were associated with mortality. A multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that in-hospital thrombotic events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.72; 95% CI 1.59-4.65; p < 0.001), age (HR: 1.035; 95% CI 1.014-1.057; p = 0.001), and albumin (HR: 0.447; 95% CI 0.277-0.723; p = 0.001) predicted morality. CONCLUSIONS: Covid-19 patients experience an equipollent rate of venous and arterial thrombotic events, that are associated with poor survival. Early identification and appropriate treatment of Covid-19 patients at risk of thrombosis may improve prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/etiology , Mortality/trends , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , Thromboembolism/epidemiology
13.
Clin Transl Gastroenterol ; 12(6): e00348, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259760

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia display enhanced levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) compared with controls, suggesting that low-grade endotoxemia may be implicated in vascular disturbances. It is unknown whether this occurs in patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) and its impact on thrombotic complications. METHODS: We measured serum levels of zonulin, a marker of gut permeability, LPS, and D-dimer in 81 patients with COVID-19 and 81 healthy subjects; the occurrence of thrombotic events in COVID-19 during the intrahospital stay was registered. RESULTS: Serum LPS and zonulin were higher in patients with COVID-19 than in control subjects and, in COVID-19, significantly correlated (R = 0.513; P < 0.001). Among the 81 patients with COVID-19, 11 (14%) experienced thrombotic events in the arterial (n = 5) and venous circulation (n = 6) during a median follow-up of 18 days (interquartile range 11-27 days). A logistic regression analysis showed that LPS (P = 0.024) and D-dimer (P = 0.041) independently predicted thrombotic events. DISCUSSION: The study reports that low-grade endotoxemia is detectable in patients with COVID-19 and is associated with thrombotic events. The coexistence of low-grade endotoxemia with enhanced levels of zonulin may suggest enhanced gut permeability as an underlying mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endotoxemia , Haptoglobins/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa , Protein Precursors/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Correlation of Data , Endotoxemia/diagnosis , Endotoxemia/metabolism , Endotoxemia/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Lipopolysaccharides/analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Permeability , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology
14.
Radiol Med ; 126(9): 1170-1180, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252205

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate CT and laboratory changes in COVID-19 patients treated with tocilizumab, compared to a control group, throughout a combined semiquantitative and texture analysis of images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From March 11 to April 20, 2020, 57 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients were retrospectively compared: group T (n = 30) receiving tocilizumab and group non-T (n = 27) undergoing only antivirals/antimalarials. Chest-CT and laboratory findings were analyzed before and after treatment. CT evaluation included both semiquantitative scoring and texture analysis of all parenchymal lesions. Survival and recovery analyses were also provided with Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: In group T, no significant differences were found for CT score after treatment, while several texture features significantly changed, including mean attenuation (p < 0.0001), skewness (p < 0.0001), entropy (p = 0.0146) and higher-order parameters, suggesting considerable fading of parenchymal lesions. PaO2/FiO2 mean value significantly increased after treatment, from 240 ± 93 to 363 ± 107 (p = 0.0003), with parallel decrease in inflammatory biomarkers (CRP, D-dimer and LDH). In group non-T, CT scoring, texture and laboratory parameters showed significant worsening at follow-up. Findings were clinically associated with opposite trends between two groups, with reduction of severe cases in group T (from 21/30 to 5/30; p < 0.0001) as compared to a significant worsening in group non-T (severe cases increasing from 6/27 to 14/27; p = 0.0473). Probability of discharge was significantly higher in group T (p < 0.0001), as well as survival rate, although not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest the potential role of CT texture analysis for assessing response to treatment in COVID-19 pneumonia, using Tocilizumab, as compared to semiquantitative evaluation, providing insight into the intrinsic parenchymal changes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
16.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(6): 1702-1707, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe but treatable mental disorder that develops after a life-threatening traumatic event. Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) hospitalisation is a potentially traumatic experience, especially in severe cases. Furthermore, the unprecedented context of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic, with daily media bombardment about COVID-19 mortality, may have amplified life-threatening perception also in patients with moderate infection. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of PTSD at 3-month follow-up in patients hospitalised for COVID-19 infection. DESIGN: In this cohort follow-up study conducted in a large Italian academic COVID-19 hospital, 115 recruited survivors were contacted by telephone 3 months after discharge to home care. The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 was administered. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyse risk factors for the development of PTSD. KEY RESULTS: A total of 10.4% of the sample received a PCL-5-based diagnosis of PTSD. Other 8.6% of the sample received a diagnosis of subthreshold PTSD, which leads to significant levels of distress and impairment. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that previous psychiatric diagnosis (odds ratio (OR) = 6.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.7-78.6, p < 0.001) and obesity (OR = 3.51, 95% CI: 1.4-857.9, p = 0.03) were risk factors for developing PTSD. Chronic pulmonary diseases approached significance as a risk factor (OR = 6.03, 95% CI: 1.0-37.1, p = 0.053). Male sex was a protective factor (OR=0.04, 95% CI: 0.0-0.041, p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: PTSD and subthreshold PTSD rates in patients hospitalised for COVID-19 are worrying. Female sex and pre-existing mental disorders are established risk factors for PTSD, while the prospective association with obesity needs further investigation. Clinicians treating COVID-19 should consider screening for PTSD at follow-up assessments in patients discharged from the hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Survivors
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 627548, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156119

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence argues that monocytes, circulating innate immune cells, are principal players in COVID-19 pneumonia. The study aimed to investigate the role of soluble (s)CD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels in predicting disease severity and characterize peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia (COVID-19 subjects). Methods: On admission, in COVID-19 subjects sCD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels, and peripheral blood monocyte and DC subsets were compared to healthy donors (HDs). According to clinical outcome, COVID-19 subjects were divided into ARDS and non-ARDS groups. Results: Compared to HDs, COVID-19 subjects showed higher sCD163 (p<0.0001) and sCD14 (p<0.0001) plasmatic levels. We observed higher sCD163 plasmatic levels in the ARDS group compared to the non-ARDS one (p=0.002). The cut-off for sCD163 plasmatic level greater than 2032 ng/ml was predictive of disease severity (AUC: 0.6786, p=0.0022; sensitivity 56.7% [CI: 44.1-68.4] specificity 73.8% [CI: 58.9-84.7]). Positive correlation between plasmatic levels of sCD163, LDH and IL-6 and between plasmatic levels of sCD14, D-dimer and ferritin were found. Compared to HDs, COVID-19 subjects showed lower percentages of non-classical (p=0.0012) and intermediate monocytes (p=0.0447), slanDCs (p<0.0001), myeloid DCs (mDCs, p<0.0001), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs, p=0.0014). Compared to the non-ARDS group, the ARDS group showed lower percentages of non-classical monocytes (p=0.0006), mDCs (p=0.0346), and pDCs (p=0.0492). Conclusions: The increase in sCD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels, observed on hospital admission in COVID-19 subjects, especially in those who developed ARDS, and the correlations of these monocyte/macrophage activation markers with typical inflammatory markers of COVID-19 pneumonia, underline their potential use to assess the risk of progression of the disease. In an early stage of the disease, the assessment of sCD163 plasmatic levels could have clinical utility in predicting the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/blood , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/blood , Monocytes/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Receptors, Cell Surface/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Myeloid Cells/metabolism , Myeloid Cells/virology , Patient Admission , Phenotype , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation
18.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(4)2021 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154297

ABSTRACT

Background: A growing body of evidence is emerging suggesting testosterone can affect all cells involved in the immune response to both bacterial and viral infections, and the testosterone effect on the immune response could explain the greater susceptibility of men to infections including COVID-19. We aimed to explore the predictive role of male serum total testosterone (TT) levels on the time till viral negativity testing among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Methods: The univariate effect of risk factors for the duration of COVID-19 viral positivity was evaluated using the log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier estimates. A multivariable Cox regression model was developed to test the role of TT levels and the subsequent odds for shorter viral positivity intervals. Results: Increasing serum TT levels and the need for an oxygen administration strategy were independently predictive for respectively reduced and increased days to negativization (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.95-2.03 and HR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.03-1.18). Conclusion: Baseline higher TT levels for male COVID-19 patients at hospital admission are associated with shorter durations of positive COVID-19 testing and thus viral clearance. Our preliminary findings might play a relevant to help pandemic control strategies if these will be verified in future larger multicentric and possibly randomized trials.

19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(5)2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1134158

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a major health threat. Pregnancy can lead to an increased susceptibility to viral infections. Although chest computed tomography (CT) represents the gold standard for the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, lung ultrasound (LUS) could be a valid alternative in pregnancy. The objectives of this prospective study were to assess the role of LUS in the diagnosis of lung involvement and in helping the physicians in the management of affected patients. Thirty pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection were admitted at the obstetrical ward of our Hospital. Mean age was 31.2 years, mean gestational age 33.8 weeks. Several LUS were performed during hospitalization. The management of the patients was decided according to the LUS score and the clinical conditions. Mean gestational age at delivery was at 37.7 weeks, preterm birth was induced in 20% of cases for a worsening of the clinical conditions. No neonatal complications occurred. In 9 cases with a high LUS score, a chest CT was performed after delivery. CT confirmed the results of LUS, showing a significant positive correlation between the two techniques. LUS seems a safe alternative to CT in pregnancy and may help in the management of these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Virus Res ; 295: 198283, 2021 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009920

ABSTRACT

The natural course of type I and III interferon (IFN) response in the respiratory tract of COVID-19 patients needs to be better defined. We showed that type I/III IFNs, IFN-regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), and IFN stimulated genes (ISGs), are highly expressed in the oropharyngeal cells of SARS-CoV-2 positive patients compared to healthy controls. Notably, the subgroup of critically-ill patients that required invasive mechanical ventilation had a general decrease in expression of IFN/ISG genes. Heterogeneous patterns of IFN-I/III response in the respiratory tract of COVID-19 patients may be associated to COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferons/genetics , Oropharynx/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...