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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 142, 2022 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thrombotic microangiopathy has been invoked as one of the most important mechanisms of damage in COVID-19 patients. Protease ADAMTS13 is a marker of microangiopathy responsible for controlling von Willebrand multimers size. Von Willebrand factor/ADAMTS13 ratio has been found impaired in COVID-19 patients outside pregnancy. METHODS: We prospectively investigated 90 pregnant women admitted to two tertiary academic hospitals in Italy with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Demographic, clinical information and routine laboratory data were collected at the hospital admission and until discharge. We investigated whether vonWillebrand /ADAMTS13 axis imbalance is a predictor of adverse outcomes. Logistic regression analysis, which controlled for potential confounders, was performed to evaluate the association between laboratory parameters and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Most women (55.6%) were parae, with median gestational age at admission of 39 weeks. At hospital admission, 63.3% were asymptomatic for COVID-19 and 24.4% showed more than one sign or symptom of infection. Nulliparae with group O showed Willebrand / ADA MTS-13 ratios significantly lower than non-O, whereas in multiparae this difference was not observed. Logistic regression showed that ratio von Willebrand to ADAMTS13 was significantly and independently associated with preterm delivery (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.5). CONCLUSION: This study shows an imbalance of vonWillebrand /ADAMTS13 axis in pregnant women with COVID-19, leading to a significantly higher and independent risk of preterm delivery. Monitoring these biomarkers might support decision making process to manage and follow-up pregnancies in this setting.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , COVID-19/blood , Pregnancy Complications/blood , Premature Birth/blood , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Academic Medical Centers , Adolescent , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/etiology , Young Adult
2.
Blood Transfus ; 2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We describe blood supply and usage from March to December 2020 in two research medical hospitals in the Apulia region of Italy: Research Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" (Centre 1) and University Hospital of Bari (Centre 2). MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective observational study of blood component transfusions in the first eight months of the pandemic: 1st March-31st December 2020.We assessed the number of hospitalised patients who were transfused, the number and type of blood components donated and the number and type of blood components transfused in different care settings. RESULTS: Blood donations were lower in 2020 than in 2019, with a significant reduction in red blood cells (RBC) transfused (-29% in 2020 vs 2019) and fewer transfusions in 2020 in the Internal Medicine departments (-67% and -44% in Centres 1 and 2, respectively) and Intensive C are Units (ICUs) (-53% and -54% in Centres 1 and 2, respectively). The overall number of fatalities was significantly lower in 2020 than in 2019; the proportion of fatalities in men was significantly higher in 2020 than in 2019 (53.9% and 41.5%, respectively; p=0.000). Among COVID-19 patients (n=645), 427 (66.2%) were transfused in Infectious Disease departments and the remaining in ICUs. The fatality rate was 14.3% in COVID patients transfused in Infectious Disease departments and 22.5% in those transfused in ICUs. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed 30- and 60-day mortality was significantly higher in patients transfused in 2020 compared to those transfused in 2019. Fatalities were mostly observed in COVID-19 patients. DISCUSSION: Present data may be helpful in understanding the trend of collection and use of blood supplies during periods of pandemic. The implementation of a Patient Blood Management programme is essential to maintain sufficient blood supplies and to keep track of clinical outcomes that represent the most important goal of transfusion.

3.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(9)2021 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction, coupled with inflammation, induces thrombo-inflammation. In COVID-19, this process is believed to be associated with clinical severity. Von Willebrand factor (VWF), and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS-13), are strong markers of endothelial dysfunction. We evaluated the impact of the VWF/ADAMTS-13 fraction on COVID-19 severity and prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cohort study including 74 COVID-19 patients, with 22 admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and 52 to the medical ward (MW), was carried out. We also evaluated, in a group of 54 patients who were prospectively observed, whether variations in VWF/ADAMTS-13 correlated with the degree of severity and routine blood parameters. RESULTS: A VWF:RCo/ADAMTS-13 fraction above 6.5 predicted in-hospital mortality in the entire cohort. At admission, a VWF:RCo/ADAMTS-13 fraction above 5.7 predicted admission to the ICU. Furthermore, the VWF:RCo/ADAMTS-13 fraction directly correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (Spearman r: 0.51, p < 0.0001) and D-dimer (Spearman r: 0.26, p = 0.03). In the prospective cohort, dynamic changes in VWF:RCo/ADAMTS-13 and the CRP concentration were directly correlated (Spearman r, p = 0.0014). This relationship was significant in both groups (ICU: p = 0.006; MW: p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The present findings show that in COVID-19, the VWF/ADAMTS-13 fraction predicts in-hospital mortality. The VWF/ADAMTS-13 fraction may be a helpful tool to monitor COVID-19 patients throughout hospitalization.

5.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(3): 772-778, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176387

ABSTRACT

It is still debated whether prophylactic doses of low-molecular- weight heparin (LMWH) are always effective in preventing Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) and mortality in COVID-19. Furthermore, there is paucity of data for those patients not requiring ventilation. We explored mortality and the safety/efficacy profile of LMWH in a cohort of Italian patients with COVID-19 who did not undergo ventilation. From the initial cohort of 422 patients, 264 were enrolled. Most (n = 156, 87.7%) received standard LMWH prophylaxis during hospitalization, with no significant difference between medical wards and Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Major or not major but clinically relevant hemorrhages were recorded in 13 (4.9%) patients: twelve in those taking prophylactic LMWH and one in a patient taking oral anticoagulants (p: n.s.). Thirty-nine patients (14.8%) with median age 75 years. were transfused. Hemoglobin (Hb) at admission was significantly lower in transfused patients and Hb at admission inversely correlated with the number of red blood cells units transfused (p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality occurred in 76 (28.8%) patients, 46 (24.3%) of whom admitted to medical wards. Furthermore, Hb levels at admittance were significantly lower in fatalities (g/dl 12.3; IQR 2.4 vs. 13.3; IQR 2.8; Mann-Whitney U-test; p = 0.001). After the exclusion of patients treated by LMWH intermediate or therapeutic doses (n = 32), the logistic regression showed that prophylaxis significantly and independently reduced mortality (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.13-0.85). Present data show that COVID-19 patients who do not require ventilation benefit from prophylactic doses of LMWH.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Transfusion , COVID-19/therapy , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Blood Transfusion/mortality , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/adverse effects , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thromboembolism/blood , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Thromboembolism/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Clin Med ; 10(2)2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021981

ABSTRACT

There is paucity of data on the transfusion need and its impact on the overall mortality in patients with COVID-19. We explored mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 who required transfusions. Information on clinical variables and in-hospital mortality were obtained from medical records of 422 patients admitted to medical wards or the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). In-hospital mortality occurred in 147 (34.8%) patients, 94 (63.9%) of whom were admitted to the ICU. The median fatalities age was 77 years (IQR 14). Overall, 100 patients (60 males) received transfusion during hospitalization. The overall mortality was significantly and independently associated with age, ICU admission, Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), and the number of transfused Red Blood Cell (RBC) units. Specifically, CKD was associated with mortality in patients admitted to medical wards, whereas the number of transfused RBC units predicted mortality in those admitted to the ICU. Transfusion strongly interacted with the admission to ICU (OR: 9.9; 95% CI: 2.5-40.0). In patients with COVID-19, age is one of the strongest risk factors in predicting mortality independently of the disease's severity. CKD confers a higher risk of mortality in patients admitted to medical wards. In those admitted to the ICU, the more RBC units are transfused, the more mortality increases.

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