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2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 790334, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715001

ABSTRACT

The capacity of pre-existing immunity to human common coronaviruses (HCoV) to cross-protect against de novo COVID-19is yet unknown. In this work, we studied the sera of 175 COVID-19 patients, 76 healthy donors and 3 intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) batches. We found that most COVID-19 patients developed anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies before IgM. Moreover, the capacity of their IgGs to react to beta-HCoV, was present in the early sera of most patients before the appearance of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG. This implied that a recall-type antibody response was generated. In comparison, the patients that mounted an anti-SARS-COV2 IgM response, prior to IgG responses had lower titres of anti-beta-HCoV IgG antibodies. This indicated that pre-existing immunity to beta-HCoV was conducive to the generation of memory type responses to SARS-COV-2. Finally, we also found that pre-COVID-19-era sera and IVIG cross-reacted with SARS-CoV-2 antigens without neutralising SARS-CoV-2 infectivity in vitro. Put together, these results indicate that whilst pre-existing immunity to HCoV is responsible for recall-type IgG responses to SARS-CoV-2, it does not lead to cross-protection against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19/immunology , Common Cold/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Immunity, Heterologous , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Immunoglobulin M/metabolism , Immunologic Memory , Male , Middle Aged , Survival Analysis
4.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(4): 575-583, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to evaluate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and SARS-CoV-2-specific immune responses after BNT162b2 vaccination. METHODS: In this prospective study, disease activity and clinical assessments were recorded from the first dose of vaccine until day 15 after the second dose in 126 patients with SLE. SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses were measured against wild-type spike antigen, while serum-neutralising activity was assessed against the SARS-CoV-2 historical strain and variants of concerns (VOCs). Vaccine-specific T cell responses were quantified by interferon-γ release assay after the second dose. RESULTS: BNT162b2 was well tolerated and no statistically significant variations of BILAG (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group) and SLEDAI (SLE Disease Activity Index) scores were observed throughout the study in patients with SLE with active and inactive disease at baseline. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and methotrexate (MTX) treatments were associated with drastically reduced BNT162b2 antibody response (ß=-78, p=0.007; ß=-122, p<0.001, respectively). Anti-spike antibody response was positively associated with baseline total immunoglobulin G serum levels, naïve B cell frequencies (ß=2, p=0.018; ß=2.5, p=0.003) and SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell response (r=0.462, p=0.003). In responders, serum neutralisation activity decreased against VOCs bearing the E484K mutation but remained detectable in a majority of patients. CONCLUSION: MMF, MTX and poor baseline humoral immune status, particularly low naïve B cell frequencies, are independently associated with impaired BNT162b2 mRNA antibody response, delineating patients with SLE who might need adapted vaccine regimens and follow-up.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antirheumatic Agents/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/drug effects , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/virology , Male , Methotrexate/adverse effects , Methotrexate/immunology , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/adverse effects , Mycophenolic Acid/immunology , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 709893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403459

ABSTRACT

Highlights: Innate immune activation during Covid-19 infection is associated with pernicious clinical outcome. Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is a worldwide threat that has already caused more than 3 000 000 deaths. It is characterized by different patterns of disease evolution depending on host factors among which old-age and pre-existing comorbidities play a detrimental role. Previous coronavirus epidemics, notably SARS-CoV, were associated with increased serum neopterin levels, which can be interpreted as a sign of acute innate immunity in response to viral infection. Here we hypothesize that neopterin may serve as a biomarker of SARS-CoV-2 viral infection and Covid-19 disease severity. Methods: We measured neopterin blood levels by ELISA. Seric concentration was quantified from 256 healthy donors and 374 Covid-19 patients at hospital admission. Enrolled Covid-19 patients were all symptomatic and displayed a large spectrum of comorbidities. Patients were followed until disease resolution or death. Results: Severe and critically ill SARS-CoV-2 infected patients were characterized by a profound exacerbation of immune activation characterized by elevated neopterin blood levels. Systemic neopterin levels above 19nM stratified healthy individuals from Covid-19 patients with 87% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Moreover, systemic neopterin levels above 53nM differentiated non-survivors from survivors with 64% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Conclusion: We propose that neopterin concentration measured at arrival to hospital is a hallmark of severe Covid-19 and identifies a high-risk population of pernicious clinical outcome with a need for special medical care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neopterin , Critical Illness , Humans
6.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 165, 2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 diabetic adults are at increased risk of severe forms irrespective of obesity. In patients with type-II diabetes, fat distribution is characterized by visceral and ectopic adipose tissues expansion, resulting in systemic inflammation, which may play a role in driving the COVID-19 cytokine storm. Our aim was to determine if cardiac adipose tissue, combined to interleukin-6 levels, could predict adverse short-term outcomes, death and ICU requirement, in COVID-19 diabetic patients during the 21 days after admission. METHODS: Eighty one consecutive patients with type-II diabetes admitted for COVID-19 were included. Interleukin-6 measurement and chest computed tomography with total cardiac adipose tissue index (CATi) measurement were performed at admission. The primary outcome was death during the 21 days following admission while intensive care requirement with or without early death (ICU-R) defined the secondary endpoint. Associations of CATi and IL-6 and threshold values to predict the primary and secondary endpoints were determined. RESULTS: Of the enrolled patients (median age 66 years [IQR: 59-74]), 73% male, median body mass index (BMI) 27 kg/m2 [IQR: 24-31]) 20 patients had died from COVID-19, 20 required intensive care and 41 were in conventional care at day 21 after admission. Increased CATi and IL-6 levels were both significantly related to increased early mortality (respectively OR = 6.15, p = 0.002; OR = 18.2, p < 0.0001) and ICU-R (respectively OR = 3.27, p = 0.01; OR = 4.86, p = 0.002). These associations remained significant independently of age, sex, BMI as well as troponin-T level and pulmonary lesion extension in CT. We combined CATi and IL-6 levels as a multiplicative interaction score (CATi*IL-6). The cut-point for this score was ≥ 6386 with a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 0.87 (AUC = 0.88) and an OR of 59.6 for early mortality (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac adipose tissue index and IL-6 determination at admission could help physicians to better identify diabetic patients with a potentially severe and lethal short term course irrespective of obesity. Diabetic patients with high CATi at admission, a fortiori associated with high IL-6 levels could be a relevant target population to promptly initiate anti-inflammatory therapies.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/pathology , COVID-19/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Interleukin-6/blood , Myocardium/pathology , Adipose Tissue/diagnostic imaging , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Size , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
9.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288968

ABSTRACT

Background & Aims: SARS-CoV2 infection is associated with an increased risk of malnutrition. Although there are numerous screening and nutritional management protocols for malnutrition, only few studies have reported nutritional evolution after COVID-19. The objectives of this study were to describe the evolution of nutritional parameters between admission and 30 days after hospital discharge, and to determine predictive factors of poor nutritional outcome after recovery in adult COVID-19 patients. Methods: In this observational longitudinal study, we report findings after discharge in 91 out of 114 patients initially admitted for COVID-19 who received early nutritional management. Nutritional status was defined using GLIM criteria and compared between admission and day 30 after discharge. Baseline predictors of nutritional status at day 30 were assessed using logistic regression. Results: Thirty days after discharge, 28.6% of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 were malnourished, compared to 42.3% at admission. Half of malnourished patients (53%) at admission recovered a normal nutritional status after discharge. Weight trajectories were heterogeneous and differed if patients had been transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU) during hospitalization (p = 0.025). High oxygen requirement during hospitalization (invasive ventilation p = 0.016 (OR 8.3 [1.6-61.2]) and/or oxygen therapy over 5 L/min p = 0.021 (OR 3.2 [1.2-8.9]) were strong predictors of malnutrition one month after discharge. Conclusions: With early nutritional management, most patients hospitalized for COVID-19 improved nutritional parameters after discharge. These findings emphasize the importance of nutritional care in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in medicine departments, especially in those transferred from ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diet therapy , Hospitalization , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Nutrition Assessment , Nutrition Therapy/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
10.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(6): 2098-2107, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Markedly elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and defective type-I interferon responses were reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether particular cytokine profiles are associated with COVID-19 severity and mortality. METHODS: Cytokine concentrations and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 antigen were measured at hospital admission in serum of symptomatic patients with COVID-19 (N = 115), classified at hospitalization into 3 respiratory severity groups: no need for mechanical ventilatory support (No-MVS), intermediate severity requiring mechanical ventilatory support (MVS), and critical severity requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Principal-component analysis was used to characterize cytokine profiles associated with severity and mortality. The results were thereafter confirmed in an independent validation cohort (N = 86). RESULTS: At time of hospitalization, ECMO patients presented a dominant proinflammatory response with elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. In contrast, an elevated type-I interferon response involving IFN-α and IFN-ß was characteristic of No-MVS patients, whereas MVS patients exhibited both profiles. Mortality at 1 month was associated with higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines in ECMO patients, higher levels of type-I interferons in No-MVS patients, and their combination in MVS patients, resulting in a combined mortality prediction accuracy of 88.5% (risk ratio, 24.3; P < .0001). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 antigen levels correlated with type-I interferon levels and were associated with mortality, but not with proinflammatory response or severity. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct cytokine profiles are observed in association with COVID-19 severity and are differentially predictive of mortality according to oxygen support modalities. These results warrant personalized treatment of COVID-19 patients based on cytokine profiling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines/immunology , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
12.
Nephrol Dial Transplant ; 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081553

ABSTRACT

We report a multicentric retrospective case series of patients with COVID-19 who developed acute kidney injury and/or proteinuria and underwent a kidney biopsy in the Paris and its metropolitan area. Forty-seven patients (80.9% men) with COVID-19 who underwent a kidney biopsy between March 08 and May 19, 2020 were included. Median age was 63 years IQR [52-69]. Comorbidities included hypertension (66.0%), diabetes mellitus (27.7%), obesity (27.7%), history of chronic kidney (25.5%), cardiac (38.6%) and respiratory (27.3%) diseases. Initial symptoms were fever (85.1%), cough (63.8%), shortness of breath (55.3%), and diarrhea (23.4%). Almost all patients developed acute kidney injury (97.9%) and 63.8% required renal replacement therapy. Kidney biopsy showed two main histopathological patterns, including acute tubular injury in 20 (42.6%) patients, and glomerular injury consisting of collapsing glomerulopathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in 17 (36.2%) patients. Two (4.3%) patients had acute vascular nephropathy, while eight (17%) had alternative diagnosis most likely unrelated to COVID-19. Acute tubular injury occurred almost invariably in the setting of severe forms of COVID-19, whereas patients with glomerular injury had various profiles of COVID-19 severity and collapsing glomerulopathy was only observed in patients harboring a combination of APOL1 risk variants. At last follow-up, 16 of the 30 patients who initially required dialysis were still on dialysis, and 9 died. The present study describes the spectrum of kidney lesions in patients with COVID-19. While acute tubular injury is correlated with COVID-19 severity, the pattern of glomerular injury is intimately associated with the expression of APOL1 risk variants.

15.
Intern Med J ; 50(12): 1551-1558, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991425

ABSTRACT

Nephrotic range proteinuria has been reported during the course of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, the pathological mechanisms underlying this manifestation are unknown. In this article, we present two cases of collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) associated with acute tubular necrosis during the course of COVID-19, and review the literature for similar reports. In our two cases, as in the 14 cases reported so far, the patients were of African ancestry. The 14 patients assessed had an APOL1 high-risk genotype. At the end of the reported period, two patients had died and five patients were still requiring dialysis. The 16 cases detailed in the present report strongly argue in favour of a causal link between SARS-CoV-2 infection and the occurrence of CG in patients homozygous for APOL1 high-risk genotype for which the term COVID-associated nephropathy (COVIDAN) can be put forward.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Kidney Cortex Necrosis/diagnosis , Kidney Cortex Necrosis/etiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Middle Aged
16.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(577)2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963895

ABSTRACT

Humoral immune responses are typically characterized by primary IgM antibody responses followed by secondary antibody responses associated with immune memory and composed of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Here, we measured acute humoral responses to SARS-CoV-2, including the frequency of antibody-secreting cells and the presence of SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies in the serum, saliva, and bronchoalveolar fluid of 159 patients with COVID-19. Early SARS-CoV-2-specific humoral responses were dominated by IgA antibodies. Peripheral expansion of IgA plasmablasts with mucosal homing potential was detected shortly after the onset of symptoms and peaked during the third week of the disease. The virus-specific antibody responses included IgG, IgM, and IgA, but IgA contributed to virus neutralization to a greater extent compared with IgG. Specific IgA serum concentrations decreased notably 1 month after the onset of symptoms, but neutralizing IgA remained detectable in saliva for a longer time (days 49 to 73 post-symptoms). These results represent a critical observation given the emerging information as to the types of antibodies associated with optimal protection against reinfection and whether vaccine regimens should consider targeting a potent but potentially short-lived IgA response.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin A/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Saliva/immunology , Saliva/virology , Time Factors
19.
Chest ; 159(2): 657-662, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-928873
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