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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 13606, 2022 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984426

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have reported that a high neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is associated with disease severity and poor prognosis in COVID-19 patients. We aimed to investigate the clinical implications of NLR in patients with COVID-19 complicated with cardiovascular diseases and/or its risk factors (CVDRF). In total, 601 patients with known NLR values were selected from the CLAVIS-COVID registry for analysis. Patients were categorized into quartiles (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) according to baseline NLR values, and demographic and clinical parameters were compared between the groups. Survival analysis was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method. The diagnostic performance of the baseline and follow-up NLR values was tested using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Finally, two-dimensional mapping of patient characteristics was conducted using t-stochastic neighborhood embedding (t-SNE). In-hospital mortality significantly increased with an increase in the baseline NLR quartile (Q1 6.3%, Q2 11.0%, Q3 20.5%; and Q4, 26.6%; p < 0.001). The cumulative mortality increased as the quartile of the baseline NLR increased. The paired log-rank test revealed significant differences in survival for Q1 vs. Q3 (p = 0.017), Q1 vs. Q4 (p < 0.001), Q2 vs. Q3 (p = 0.034), and Q2 vs. Q4 (p < 0.001). However, baseline NLR was not identified as an independent prognostic factor using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. The area under the curve for predicting in-hospital death based on baseline NLR was only 0.682, whereas that of follow-up NLR was 0.893. The two-dimensional patient map with t-SNE showed a cluster characterized by high mortality with high NLR at follow-up, but these did not necessarily overlap with the population with high NLR at baseline. NLR may have prognostic implications in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with CVDRF, but its significance depends on the timing of data collection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , COVID-19/complications , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Lymphocytes , Neutrophils , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
2.
Circ J ; 86(8): 1237-1244, 2022 07 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957091

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both pre-existing atrial fibrillation (AF) and new-onset AF (NOAF) are observed in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, the effect of AF on clinical outcomes is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of AF, especially NOAF, on the outcomes of hospitalized patients with COVID-19.Methods and Results: This study analyzed 673 COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular diseases and risk factors (CVDRF). Patients were divided into 3 groups; pre-existing AF (n=55), NOAF (n=28), and sinus rhythm (SR) (n=590). The baseline characteristics and in-hospital outcomes were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 68 years, 65.4% were male, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 15.6%. The NOAF group demonstrated a higher in-hospital mortality rate (42.9%) than the pre-existing AF (30.9%) and SR (11.2%) groups (P<0.001). Patients with NOAF had a higher incidence of acute respiratory syndrome, multiple organ disease, hemorrhage, and stroke than those with pre-existing AF and NOAF. NOAF was independently associated with in-hospital mortality after adjusting for pre-existing AF and 4C mortality score (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 4.71 [1.63-13.6], P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with NOAF had significantly worse outcomes as compared to patients with pre-existing AF and SR. The incidence of NOAF would be a useful predictor of clinical outcomes during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Aged , Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Registries , Risk Factors
3.
Circulation reports ; 4(7):315-321, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1940120

ABSTRACT

Background: Male sex is associated with a worse clinical course and outcomes of COVID-19, particularly in older patients. However, studies on COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular disease and/or risk factors (CVDRF), which are representative risk factors of COVID-19, are limited. In this study, we investigated the effect of sex on the outcomes of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with CVDRF. Methods and Results: We analyzed 693 COVID-19 patients with CVDRF. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on sex, and baseline characteristics and in-hospital outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. The mean age of the 693 patients was 68 years;64.8% were men and 96.1% were Japanese. In a univariate analysis model, sex was not significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.22;95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–2.02;P=0.43). However, men had higher in-hospital mortality than women, especially among older (age ≥80 years) patients (OR 2.21;95% CI 1.11–4.41;P=0.024). After adjusting for age and pivotal risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, coronary artery disease, chronic lung disease, and chronic kidney disease), multivariate analysis suggested that male sex was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (OR 2.20;95% CI 1.23–3.92;P=0.008). Conclusions: In this post hoc analysis of a nationwide registry focusing on patients with COVID-19 and CVDRF, men had higher in-hospital mortality than women, especially among older patients.

4.
Circ Rep ; 4(8): 353-362, 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916998

ABSTRACT

Background: Although reductions in hospitalizations for myocardial infarction and heart failure have been reported during the period of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, it is unclear how the overall number of hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) treatment changed in the early stages of the pandemic. Methods and Results: We analyzed the records of 574 certified hospitals affiliated with the Japanese Circulation Society and retrieved data from April 2015 to March 2020. Records were obtained from the nationwide Japanese Registry of All Cardiac and Vascular Diseases-Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. A quasi-Poisson regression model was used to estimate the number of hospitalizations for CVD treatment. Between January and March 2020, when the number of COVID-19 cases was relatively low in Japan, the actual/estimated number of hospitalizations for acute CVD was 18,233/21,634 (84.3%), whereas the actual/estimated number of scheduled hospitalizations was 16,921/19,066 (88.7%). The number of hospitalizations for acute heart failure and scheduled hospitalizations for valvular disease and aortic aneurysm were 81.1%, 84.6%, and 83.8% of the estimated values, respectively. A subanalysis that considered only facilities without hospitalization restrictions did not alter the results for these diseases. Conclusions: The spread of COVID-19 was associated with a decreased number of hospitalizations for CVD in Japan, even in the early stages of the pandemic.

5.
Thromb Res ; 216: 90-96, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1907824

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVDRF) have been reported to develop coagulation abnormalities frequently. However, there are limitations in conventional predictive models for the occurrence of thromboembolism in patients with COVID-19 and CVDRF. METHODS: Among data on 1518 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 registered with CLAVIS-COVID, a Japanese nationwide cohort study, 693 patients with CVDRF were subjected to least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) analysis; a method of shrinking coefficients for reducing variance and minimizing bias to increase predictive accuracy. LASSO analysis was performed to identify risk factors for systemic thromboembolic events; occurrence of arterial and venous thromboembolism during the index hospitalization as the primary endpoint. RESULTS: LASSO analysis identified a prior systemic thromboembolism, male sex, hypoxygenemia requiring invasive mechanical ventilation support, C-reactive protein levels and D-dimer levels at admission, and congestion on chest X-ray at admission as potential risk factors for the primary endpoint. The developed risk model consisting of these risk factors showed good discriminative performance (AUC-ROC: 0.83, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 0.77-0.90), which was significantly better than that shown by D-dimer (AUC-ROC: 0.70, 95 % CI: 0.60-0.80) (p < 0.001). Furthermore, systemic embolic events were independently associated with in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio: 3.29; 95 % CI: 1.31-8.00). CONCLUSIONS: Six parameters readily available at the time of admission were identified as risk factors for thromboembolic events, and these may be capable of stratifying the risk of in-hospital thromboembolic events, which are associated with in-hospital mortality, in patients with COVID-19 and CVDRF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Venous Thromboembolism , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cohort Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
6.
Circ Rep ; 4(7): 315-321, 2022 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869131

ABSTRACT

Background: Male sex is associated with a worse clinical course and outcomes of COVID-19, particularly in older patients. However, studies on COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular disease and/or risk factors (CVDRF), which are representative risk factors of COVID-19, are limited. In this study, we investigated the effect of sex on the outcomes of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with CVDRF. Methods and Results: We analyzed 693 COVID-19 patients with CVDRF. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on sex, and baseline characteristics and in-hospital outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. The mean age of the 693 patients was 68 years; 64.8% were men and 96.1% were Japanese. In a univariate analysis model, sex was not significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-2.02; P=0.43). However, men had higher in-hospital mortality than women, especially among older (age ≥80 years) patients (OR 2.21; 95% CI 1.11-4.41; P=0.024). After adjusting for age and pivotal risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, coronary artery disease, chronic lung disease, and chronic kidney disease), multivariate analysis suggested that male sex was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (OR 2.20; 95% CI 1.23-3.92; P=0.008). Conclusions: In this post hoc analysis of a nationwide registry focusing on patients with COVID-19 and CVDRF, men had higher in-hospital mortality than women, especially among older patients.

7.
J Cardiol ; 79(4): 501-508, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and underlying cardiovascular comorbidities have poor prognoses. Our aim was to identify the impact of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which is associated with mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome, on the prognoses of patients with COVID-19 and underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. METHODS: Among 1518 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 enrolled in the CLAVIS-COVID (Clinical Outcomes of COVID-19 Infection in Hospitalized Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases and/or Risk Factors study), 515 patients with cardiovascular comorbidities were analyzed. Patients were divided into tertiles based on LDH levels at admission [tertile 1 (T1), <235 U/L; tertile 2 (T2), 235-355 U/L; and tertile 3 (T3); ≥356 U/L]. We investigated the impact of LDH levels on the in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The mean age was 70.4 ± 30.0 years, and 65.3% were male. There were significantly more in-hospital deaths in T3 than in T1 and T2 [n = 50 (29.2%) vs. n = 15 (8.7%), and n = 24 (14.0%), respectively; p < 0.001]. Multivariable analysis adjusted for age, comorbidities, vital signs, and laboratory data including D-dimer and high-sensitivity troponin showed T3 was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-6.13; p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: High serum LDH levels at the time of admission are associated with an increased risk of in-hospital death in patients with COVID-19 and known cardiovascular disease and may aid in triage of these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Cardiol ; 79(4): 476-481, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity is reported to be a predictor of adverse clinical events in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Western countries. However, there are limited data reported regarding the prognostic impact of obesity in Asian patients. We investigated the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and in-hospital outcomes in 580 Japanese patients with cardiovascular disease and/or risk factors and who were admitted for COVID-19 infection using data from 49 hospitals in Japan. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Clinical Outcomes of COVID-19 Infection in Hospitalized Patients with Cardiovascular Disease and/or Risk Factors (CLAVIS-COVID) registry. BMI was classified into four groups accordance with the definition of the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity, as follows: underweight, <18.5 kg/m2; normal range, 18.5 to <25 kg/m2; pre-obese, 25 to 30 kg/m2; and obese, ≥30 kg/m2. RESULTS: In-hospital death occurred in 15.0% (n=87) of the patients and intubation was performed for 139 (24.0%) patients. In a multivariate analysis, we found a significant association between higher BMI and in-hospital mortality [underweight: hazard ratio (HR) 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.97; p=0.041; pre-obese: HR 1.46, 95%CI 0.84-2.55; p=0.18; and obese: HR 3.28, 95%CI 1.34-8.02; p=0.009 vs. normal range]. In contrast, the association between BMI and the intubation rate was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity was associated with a stepwise increase in the risk of in-hospital mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19 infection. The threshold BMI for the increased risk of a worse outcome was 30, which was much lower in comparison to Western countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Body Mass Index , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Circ J ; 85(11): 2111-2115, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435579

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine whether disease severity varied according to whether coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients had multiple or single cardiovascular diseases and risk factors (CVDRFs).Methods and Results:COVID-19 patients with single (n=281) or multiple (n=412) CVDRFs were included retrospectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed no significant difference in the risk of in-hospital death between groups, but patients with multiple CVDRFs had a significantly higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio: 1.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-2.81). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients with multiple CVDRFs have a higher risk of complications than those with a single CDVRF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Female , Health Status , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index
10.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(6): 4955-4967, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414866

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We assessed the outcome of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with heart failure (HF) compared with patients with other cardiovascular disease and/or risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidaemia). We further wanted to determine the incidence of HF events and its consequences in these patient populations. METHODS AND RESULTS: International retrospective Postgraduate Course in Heart Failure registry for patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and CArdioVascular disease and/or risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidaemia) was performed in 28 centres from 15 countries (PCHF-COVICAV). The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Of 1974 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 1282 had cardiovascular disease and/or risk factors (median age: 72 [interquartile range: 62-81] years, 58% male), with HF being present in 256 [20%] patients. Overall in-hospital mortality was 25% (n = 323/1282 deaths). In-hospital mortality was higher in patients with a history of HF (36%, n = 92) compared with non-HF patients (23%, n = 231, odds ratio [OR] 1.93 [95% confidence interval: 1.44-2.59], P < 0.001). After adjusting, HF remained associated with in-hospital mortality (OR 1.45 [95% confidence interval: 1.01-2.06], P = 0.041). Importantly, 186 of 1282 [15%] patients had an acute HF event during hospitalization (76 [40%] with de novo HF), which was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (89 [48%] vs. 220 [23%]) than in patients without HF event (OR 3.10 [2.24-4.29], P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized COVID-19 patients with HF are at increased risk for in-hospital death. In-hospital worsening of HF or acute HF de novo are common and associated with a further increase in in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Aged , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e052708, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412866

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Predictive algorithms to inform risk management decisions are needed for patients with COVID-19, although the traditional risk scores have not been adequately assessed in Asian patients. We aimed to evaluate the performance of a COVID-19-specific prediction model, the 4C (Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium) Mortality Score, along with other conventional critical care risk models in Japanese nationwide registry data. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Hospitalised patients with COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease or coronary risk factors from January to May 2020 in 49 hospitals in Japan. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Two different types of outcomes, in-hospital mortality and a composite outcome, defined as the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and mortality. RESULTS: The risk scores for 693 patients were tested by predicting in-hospital mortality for all patients and composite endpoint among those not intubated at baseline (n=659). The number of events was 108 (15.6%) for mortality and 178 (27.0%) for composite endpoints. After missing values were multiply imputed, the performance of the 4C Mortality Score was assessed and compared with three prediction models that have shown good discriminatory ability (RISE UP score, A-DROP score and the Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS)). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the 4C Mortality Score was 0.84 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.88) for in-hospital mortality and 0.78 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.81) for the composite endpoint. It showed greater discriminatory ability compared with other scores, except for the RISE UP score, for predicting in-hospital mortality (AUC: 0.82, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.86). Similarly, the 4C Mortality Score showed a positive net reclassification improvement index over the A-DROP and REMS for mortality and over all three scores for the composite endpoint. The 4C Mortality Score model showed good calibration, regardless of outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The 4C Mortality Score performed well in an independent external COVID-19 cohort and may enable appropriate disposition of patients and allocation of medical resources.Trial registration number UMIN000040598.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Clin Med ; 10(14)2021 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314671

ABSTRACT

Systemic inflammation and hypercoagulopathy are known pathophysiological processes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), particularly in patients with known cardiovascular disease or its risk factors (CVD). However, whether a cumulative assessment of these biomarkers at admission could contribute to the prediction of in-hospital outcomes remains unknown. The CLAVIS-COVID registry was a Japanese nationwide retrospective multicenter observational study, supported by the Japanese Circulation Society. Consecutive hospitalized patients with pre-existing CVD and COVID-19 were enrolled. Patients were stratified by the tertiles of CRP and D-dimer values at the time of admission. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were constructed. In 461 patients (65.5% male; median age, 70.0), the median baseline CRP and D-dimer was 58.3 (interquartile range, 18.2-116.0) mg/L and 1.5 (interquartile range, 0.8-3.0) mg/L, respectively. Overall, the in-hospital mortality rate was 16.5%, and the rates steadily increased in concordance with both CRP (5.0%, 15.0%, and 28.2%, respectively p < 0.001) and D-dimer values (6.8%, 19.6%, and 22.5%, respectively p = 0.001). Patients with the lowest tertiles of both biomarkers (CRP, 29.0 mg/L; D-dimer, 1.00 mg/L) were at extremely low risk of in-hospital mortality (0% until day 50, and 1.4% overall). Conversely, the elevation of both CRP and D-dimer levels was a significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (Hazard ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-5.60). A similar trend was observed when the biomarker threshold was set at a clinically relevant threshold. In conclusion, the combination of these abnormalities may provide a framework for rapid risk estimation for in-hospital COVID-19 patients with CVD.

13.
Circ Rep ; 3(7): 375-380, 2021 Jul 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286857

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged healthcare systems, at times overwhelming intensive care units (ICUs). We aimed to describe the length and rate of ICU admission, and explore the clinical variables influencing ICU use, for COVID-19 patients with known cardiovascular diseases or their risk factors (CVDRF). Methods and Results: A post hoc analysis was performed of 693 Japanese COVID-19 patients with CVDRF enrolled in the nationwide CLAVIS-COVID registration system between January and May 2020 (mean [±SD] age 68.3±14.9 years; 35% female); 199 patients (28.7%) required ICU management. The mean (±SD) ICU length of stay (LOS) was 19.3±18.5 days, and the rate of in-hospital death and hospital LOS were significantly higher (P<0.001) and longer (P<0.001), respectively, in the ICU than non-ICU group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that clinical variables reflecting impaired general condition (e.g., high C-reactive protein, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, SpO2, albumin level), male sex, and previous use of ß-blockers) were associated with ICU admission (all P<0.001). Notably, age was inversely associated with ICU admission, and this was particularly prominent among elderly patients (OR 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.95-0.99; P=0.0018). Conclusions: One-third of COVID patients with CVDRF required ICU care during the first phase of the pandemic in Japan. Other than anticipated clinical variables, such as hypoxia and altered mental status, age was inversely associated with the use of the ICU, warranting further investigation.

14.
J Telemed Telecare ; : 1357633X211011825, 2021 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221690

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the development of a system that would prevent the infection of healthcare providers is in urgent demand. We sought to investigate the feasibility and validity of a telemedicine-based system in which healthcare providers remotely check the vital signs measured by patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Patients hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 measured and uploaded their vital signs to secure cloud storage. Additionally, the respiratory rates were monitored using a mat-type sensor placed under the bed. We assessed the time until the values became available on the Cloud and the agreements between the patient-measured vital signs and simultaneous healthcare provider measurements. RESULTS: Between 26 May-23 September 2020, 3835 vital signs were measured and uploaded to the cloud storage by the patients (n=16, median 72 years old, 31% women). All patients successfully learned how to use these devices with a 10-minute lecture. The median time until the measurements were available on the cloud system was only 0.35 min, and 95.2% of the vital signs were available within 5 min of the measurement. The agreement between the patients' and healthcare providers' measurements was excellent for all parameters. Interclass coefficient correlations were as follows: systolic (0.92, p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (0.86, p<0.001), heart rate (0.89, p<0.001), peripheral oxygen saturation (0.92, p<0.001), body temperature (0.83, p<0.001), and respiratory rates (0.90, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine-based self-assessment of vital signs in patients with COVID-19 was feasible and reliable. The system will be a useful alternative to traditional vital sign measurements by healthcare providers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

15.
Circ J ; 85(6): 921-928, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216947

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the effects of age on the outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and on cardiac biomarker profiles, especially in patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or risk factors (CVDRF).Methods and Results:A nationwide multicenter retrospective study included 1,518 patients with COVID-19. Of these patients, 693 with underlying CVDRF were analyzed; patients were divided into age groups (<55, 55-64, 65-79, and ≥80 years) and in-hospital mortality and age-specific clinical and cardiac biomarker profiles on admission evaluated. Overall, the mean age of patients was 68 years, 449 (64.8%) were male, and 693 (45.7%) had underlying CVDRF. Elderly (≥80 years) patients had a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality regardless of concomitant CVDRF than younger patients (P<0.001). Typical characteristics related to COVID-19, including symptoms and abnormal findings on baseline chest X-ray and computed tomography scans, were significantly less prevalent in the elderly group than in the younger groups. However, a significantly (P<0.001) higher proportion of elderly patients were positive for cardiac troponin (cTn), and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro BNP (NT-proBNP) levels on admission were significantly higher among elderly than younger patients (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients with COVID-19 had a higher risk of mortality during the hospital course, regardless of their history of CVDRF, were more likely to be cTn positive, and had significantly higher BNP/NT-proBNP levels than younger patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Troponin/blood , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Female , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment
16.
Circ J ; 85(6): 939-943, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216946

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases and/or risk factors (CVDRF) have been reported as risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).Methods and Results:In total, we selected 693 patients with CVDRF from the CLAVIS-COVID database of 1,518 cases in Japan. The mean age was 68 years (35% females). Statin use was reported by 31% patients at admission. Statin users exhibited lower incidence of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) insertion (1.4% vs. 4.6%, odds ratio [OR]: 0.295, P=0.037) and septic shock (1.4% vs. 6.5%, OR: 0.205, P=0.004) despite having more comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests the potential benefits of statins use against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Dyslipidemias/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Patient Admission , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Databases, Factual , Dyslipidemias/diagnosis , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Female , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
17.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249449, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171683

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgM antibodies in symptomatic Japanese COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Serum samples (n = 114) from 34 COVID-19 patients with mild to critical clinical manifestations were examined. The presence and titers of IgG antibody for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were determined by a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) using Alinity i SARS-CoV-2 IgG and by an immunochromatographic (IC) IgM/IgG antibody assay using the Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Test. RESULTS: IgG was detected by the CMIA in 40%, 88%, and 100% of samples collected within 1 week, 1-2 weeks, and 2 weeks after symptom onset in severe and critical cases, and 0%, 38%, and 100% in mild/moderate cases, respectively. In severe and critical cases, the positive IgG detection rate with the IC assay was 60% within one week and 63% between one and two weeks. In mild/moderate cases, the positive IgG rate was 17% within one week and 63% between one and two weeks; IgM was positive in 80% and 75% of severe and critical cases, and 42% and 88% of mild/moderate cases, respectively. On the CMIA, no anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies were detected in COVID-19 outpatients with mild symptoms within 10 days from onset, whereas 50% of samples from severe inpatients were IgG-positive in the same period. The IC assay detected higher IgM positivity earlier from symptom onset in severe and critical cases than in mild/moderate cases. CONCLUSIONS: A serologic anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody analysis can complement PCR for diagnosing COVID-19 14 days after symptom onset.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19 , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoassay , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged
18.
Humanities & Social Sciences Communications ; 8(1), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1066032

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCWs) treating and caring for patients with emerging infectious diseases often experience psychological distress. However, the psychological impact and behavior change of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic among HCWs are still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the worries and concerns of HCWs regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. In this cross-sectional survey, a web-based questionnaire was distributed among HCWs working in hospitals or clinics across Japanese medical facilities from April 20 to May 1, 2020. The questionnaire comprised items on demographics, worries and concerns, perceptions regarding the sufficiency of information, and behavioral changes pertaining to the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 4386 HCWs completed the survey;1648 (64.7%) were aged 30–39 years, 2379 (54.2%) were male, and 782 (18.1%) were frontline HCWs, directly caring for patients with COVID-19 on a daily basis. 3500 HCWs (79.8%) indicated that they were seriously worried about the pandemic. The most frequent concern was the consequence of becoming infected on their family, work, and society (87.4%). Additionally, the majority (55.5%) had restricted social contact and almost all HCWs endorsed a shortage in personal protective equipment (median, 8/9 (interquartile range;7–9) on a Likert scale). There was no significant difference in the degree of worry between frontline and non-frontline HCWs (8/9 (7–9) vs. 8/9 (7–9), p = 0.25). Frontline HCWs, compared to non-frontline HCWs, were more likely to have the need to avoid contact with families and friends (24.8% vs. 17.8%, p < 0.001) and indicated that they cannot evade their professional duty during the COVID-19 pandemic (9/9 (7–9) vs. 8/9 (6–9), p < 0.001). Further, the extremely low proportion of frontline HCWs reported that they would take a leave of absence to avoid infection (1.2%). In conclusions, both frontline and non-frontline HCWs expressed comparable concerns regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. Because HCWs, especially frontline HCWs, reported that they cannot be obliged to do avoid their duty, effective mental health protection strategies should be developed and implemented for HCWs.

19.
Circ Rep ; 2(9): 499-506, 2020 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713820

ABSTRACT

Background: The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the respiratory management strategy with regard to the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) in Japan is unclear. Methods and Results: This cross-sectional study used a self-reported online questionnaire, with responses from 174 institutions across Japan. More than 60% of institutions responded that the treatment of AHF patients requiring respiratory management became fairly or very difficult during the COVID-19 pandemic than earlier, with institutions in alert areas considering such treatment significantly more difficult than those in non-alert areas (P=0.004). Overall, 61.7% and 58.8% of institutions changed their indications for NPPV and HFNC, respectively. Significantly more institutions in the alert area changed their practices for the use of NPPV and HFNC during the COVID-19 pandemic (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). When there was insufficient time or information to determine whether AHF patients may have concomitant COVID-19, institutions in alert areas were significantly more likely to refrain from using NPPV and HFNC than institutions in non-alert areas. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled healthcare providers to change the respiratory management of AHF, especially in alert areas.

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